You should replace your Samsung Galaxy Note 7 before it’s too late

Better safe than sorry

As you might have heard, Samsung’s best phone ever is literally exploding around the world. The chances of you owning an unsafe unit are slim – Samsung claims only one in every 42,000 units are affected – but the inconvenience of replacing your Galaxy Note 7 or asking for a refund shouldn’t hold you back. Take the latest incidents as examples.


In what seems to be the most damaging instance yet, a man’s garage in Horry County, South Carolina caught fire while charging his Galaxy Note 7 two days ago. The scare happened as Wesley Hartzog came back to his home after leaving his Samsung phone charging in the room. The source of damage was found to be near the electric socket used to charge the handset, leading to the speculation. No one was injured, but Hartzog and his family are now forced to live in hotels while repairs are made.

Another similarly scary case also happened two days ago in St. Petersburg, Florida, where another man lost his Jeep Grand Cherokee to a fire. The cause is centered around the Galaxy Note 7 Nathan Dornacher left charging inside the vehicle, as he and his wife were unloading a desk they bought from a yard sale. While you shouldn’t leave a phone charging in a car under the scorching sun, a handset shouldn’t explode strong enough to destroy a large SUV either. Again, luckily, no was harmed.


The situation has become so bad that the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sent out a statement advising Galaxy Note 7 users against charging or even turning on their phones while in flight. Despite there being only 35 reported incidents as of September 1 (doesn’t include the two reported here), the FAA is taking no risks, and considers the Samsung phone a possible explosive. To make matters worse, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) urges consumers who own a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 to “power them down and stop charging or using the device.” Samsung is agreeing with the CPSC, and is asking users to exchange their phones right away.

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So, what exactly is causing the explosions? Samsung UK explained that it’s an issue with the battery cell, wherein overheating occurs when the anode-to-cathode comes into contact, which is a “very rare manufacturing error.”

We recently explained how to tell if your Galaxy Note 7 is safe or a possible hazard, and we also covered the replacement process for customers in the Philippines. Our advice is to choose the latter option before any more unnecessary accidents arise.

Sources: WMBF News, Fox 13

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