Enterprise

Microsoft now supports email addresses in 15 Indian languages

More than a billion people in India do not speak English

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Microsoft has announced support for email addresses in 15 Indian languages across its apps and services, including Office 365, Outlook 2016, Outlook.com, Exchange Online, and Exchange Online Protection (EOP).

The initiative by Microsoft comes on the occasion of International Mother Language Day, which is celebrated on February 21 every year. The company is also making efforts to support Email Address Internationalization (EAI), which makes technology accessible in local languages.

The 15 Indian languages supported for email addresses include Hindi, Bengali, Bodo, Dogri, Gujarati, Konkani, Maithili, Marathi, Manipuri, Nepali, Punjabi, Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu, and Urdu. These languages are a part of the IN Registry that keeps a record of languages in which IDNs can be stored.

An Internationalized Domain Name (IDN) is an Internet domain name that contains a language-specific script or alphabet — such as Devanagari, Arabic, Chinese, Cyrillic, Tamil, Hebrew, or Latin Alphabets. They also support Unicode, an international standard that encodes languages and scripts so that it’s accessible on practically any modern computer out there.

Speaking on the addition of support for these languages, Microsoft India COO Meetul Patel said that the move represents a step forward in eliminating language as a barrier to the adoption of technology and communication tools. “Currently, Indian languages are under-represented online. Of the 447 different languages spoken in India, none make it to the list of top 50 digital languages,” Microsoft said in a blog post.

Starting with Project Basha in 1998, Microsoft has been working to provide local language computing in Indian languages. Microsoft currently supports 22 constitutionally recognized Indian languages — including 11 Indian language scripts for Office and Windows.

As a member of the Universal Acceptance Steering Group, the company says it will continue to extend support to languages and scripts, including right-to-left languages like Urdu and Arabic.

Google, too, had a launch on International Mother Language Day, and introduced Tamil language support for its advertising products Google AdWords and Google AdSense.

Enterprise

The US has temporarily halted the TikTok and WeChat ban

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Late last week, Trump finally brought the hammer down on TikTok and WeChat. Supposedly, by Sunday, both Apple and Google should have pulled the platforms from their respective app stores. However, in a late ruling, that’s not happening anymore. As of late Sunday afternoon, the United States has temporarily halted the TikTok and WeChat ban.

In San Francisco, a US Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler has ruled in favor of TikTok and WeChat. According to Reuters, the judge found “serious questions going to the merits of the First Amendment [or right to free speech] claim.” Further, the ruling states that the bans will not alleviate the government’s cybersecurity concerns at all. If anything, it will only impede the communication between private individuals using the platform.

Yesterday, TikTok officially filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration, citing violations in both the right to free speech and due process. Now, the judge’s ruling effectively blocked the ban from taking place. Of note, however, the ruling covers only WeChat.

On the TikTok side of things, the US Commerce Department temporarily halted the order of its own accord. Besides the lawsuit against the administration, TikTok is also in the middle of a finalized business deal with Oracle (whom Trump gave a blessing to).

Though both bans are on hold, the platforms’ futures are still up in the air. With a finalized buyer already, TikTok is looking to form a separate, American-owned corporation, TikTok Global, to continue its operations in the country. Meanwhile, WeChat is still figuring future plans on its own. Trump has also started to question WeChat’s owner Tencent in its other businesses.

SEE ALSO: China would rather shut TikTok down than sell it

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Enterprise

TikTok is suing Trump

Citing violation of free speech and due process

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Late last week, President Donald Trump issued a final directive against TikTok’s Chinese operations in the United States. Starting late Sunday, Apple and Google will forcibly pull the popular platform out of their respective app stores. TikTok doesn’t have much recourse. To stave off the potential shutdown, TikTok is suing Trump.

Reported by The Wall Street Journal, ByteDance filed an eleventh-hour lawsuit against the administration for violating the right to free speech. Further, the company claims the lack of due process in the impending ban.

Over the past two months, Trump fired off a vicious crusade against TikTok. Back in August, his administration issued a deadline for the platform to either leave the country or find an American buyer.

Since then, Oracle has emerged as the winner for TikTok’s US operations. Over the weekend, Trump has also “given the deal [his] blessing,” as reported by Reuters. With the deal, Oracle will create a new corporation, named TikTok Global, for the platform’s US operations. The upcoming company will recruit American directors and a security consultant on the board.

That said, TikTok’s fate is still up in the air. Whereas TikTok’s strategy will delay the ban, Trump’s erratic moves will force the platform to quickly shift to American control. More news will likely surface after the weekend.

SEE ALSO: China would rather shut TikTok down than sell it

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Enterprise

Trump is now targeting Tencent Games

Investigating Epic Games and Riot Games

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Today, the Trump administration finally administered a coup de grâce against TikTok and WeChat. The government has effectively blocked the popular platforms from app stores nationwide. Now, they are setting their sights on another target. Trump is now targeting Tencent Games.

According to Bloomberg, the Trump administration has officially asked League of Legends’s Riot Studios and Fortnite’s Epic Games for their ties to Tencent Games. Notably, the Chinese Tencent Games owns Riot Games, plus a minority stake in Epic Games.

The Committee on Foreign Investment inquired “about their security protocols in handling Americans’ personal data.” Both League of Legends and Fortnite are still two of the most popular multiplayer games today. Naturally, millions of Americans play these games every day.

Of course, it’s no surprise that the American government is now pursuing Tencent Games for their alleged Chinese ties. WeChat’s ban, in fact, stems from its ties to Tencent. At the time of WeChat’s first involvement in the ongoing ban, pundits also speculated on the eventual attack against Tencent’s other properties. Now, it’s materializing.

At this point, no one knows if Trump’s latest attack will go anywhere. The administration is likely still handling the successful attack against TikTok and WeChat.

SEE ALSO: Oracle wins bid for TikTok’s US operations

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