Accessories

Treblab X2 Hands-On: Give in-ear headphones a chance

For people done with wires getting magically tangled

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In-ear headphones aren’t exactly stylish and there’s always this fear that you’ll easily lose either one. I used the Treblab X2 for roughly three weeks and this is how it went.

Before we proceed, I need to get a few things out of the way. This is by no means an expert review; I’m nowhere near an audio expert; I’m just like a lot of you — a casual listener who enjoys a good tune or two. With that said, let’s go.

Design

When Apple’s AirPods were first announced, it wasn’t received warmly. Two small in-ear headphones sticking out your ear is not exactly a good look. It also didn’t look secure and appeared like one might fall off at any given moment.

These concerns remain true today, even for other in-ear headphones. I did a quick poll on Instagram stories to ask people if they dig the look of the Treblab X2. It was a landslide victory for the no votes.

While taking photos for this article, our Creative Director Chay even said, “It looks like there are tiny hammers sticking out of your ear.”

I have to admit, in the beginning, I shared this opinion. Not anymore.

Nope, that’s not Mjolnir in my ear

The Treblab X2’s hammer-like design actually helps in keeping the headphones inside your ear. It’s something our Lifestyle Editor Isa isn’t too fond off, but it doesn’t bother me.

I had these on while doing some light basketball shooting drills for a little over an hour and not once did it feel like they were going to fall off. Those drills involve a lot of running and jumping, but even then, the Treblab X2 stayed firmly in place.

It also has an IPX4 rating which means it can withstand body sweat and even a little rain.

Ballin’ with the Treblab X2

I did get weird looks from some people as I made my way to the basketball court. It went on as I was going through the drills. It may take a while before people are used to seeing in-ear headphones out and about.

Basics

Inside the box are, of course, the two in-ear headphones. Each one has two buttons and are labeled L and R at the bottom tip so you know which one goes where.

It also comes with a charging dock that doubles as a carrying case. The dock can provide one full charge for each earbud. There’s a carrying strap for the dock so it’s easier to grab.

The Treblab X2 looks nice if you ask me

You’ll also find three sizes of silicone eartips, three sizes of expandable foam eartips, and three sizes of X-Drop ear-fins so you can find the one that works best for you.

Pairing is a breeze. Turn on the right earbud first. When you turn the left one on, it should immediately connect to the right earbud.

Press and hold the power button for about four to five seconds. If you have them on, you should hear a voice prompt say “pairing.” Otherwise, there is an LED light indicator that should blink red and blue to indicate the device is ready for pairing.

The Treblab X2 is made of beryllium — it’s the same material used in other high-end sound devices. How exactly does it perform?

Performance

In a word: Fantastic.

I’ve had a rough go with previous wireless headphones. The previous two or three I used didn’t quite live up to their billing and would quickly disconnect from the device even if I’m about 10 or 15 feet away. That’s not the case with the Treblab X2.

It can be paired with two devices and has a range of 38 feet or roughly around 11.5 meters. Once turned on, it pairs to your preferred device right away. There were moments when I would wonder why no sound was coming from my phone. I didn’t realize they quickly connected to the Treblab, but that’s just me being stupid.

Pairing the Treblab X2 is a breeze

The pairing and quick connection is key for me since I’ve used Bluetooth headphones wherein the connection didn’t feel seamless. It’s a little detail that users should not have to worry about and Treblab does it well.

How about sound quality?

As mentioned earlier, I am by no means an audio expert. However, I do deal with audio a lot. I have been in the business of video production for roughly five to six years now (yikes, I’m old), so it’s imperative I always have a good pair of headphones with me to make sure audio is good for publishing.

I’ve edited several videos and some podcasts already with the Treblab X2, and I am more than satisfied.

It produces a clear and loud enough sound that I can maintain focus despite editing in a noisy environment. But it’s not too loud that it would hurt my ears.

Video editing with the Treblab X2

The bass doesn’t come at you with full force. Using the Treblab X2 feels more like watching a low-key gig at a bar than being in a jam-packed coliseum concert.

Its passive noise cancellation is great for when you still want to hear what’s going on around you despite having the headphones on. That’s perfect since I also use them while walking to and from work.

I still need to hear if there’s anything coming my way despite “Sugar We’re Going Down” by Fall Out Boy blasting in my ear.

In case you were wondering, I like listening to upbeat tracks while walking so I can keep my pace up. Here’s my playlist if you want to give a try.

Final thoughts

Its battery is supposed to last for up to 10 hours. During my test, it actually felt like it lasted longer. I’ve gone two days without charging and I usually use it for roughly six hours per day.

I don’t recommend having it on for longer than four hours. Make sure you let your ears breathe after two or three hours of use. That goes for any in-ear headphones.

Take the earbuds off every two or three hours

Will I use it even after completing this hands-on review? The answer is yes. It does everything I need it to do and accompanies me while playing ball or walking home.

The Treblab X2 performs probably better than you would expect from any wireless in-ear headphones. The look might put some people off, but if you’re after headphones you can use while working out, this is a solid option.

If, like me, you’re fed up with wires magically getting tangled inside your pocket, I would give the Treblab X2 a chance.

Accessories

Global Sources: Sustainable Cases

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At a show like Global Sources iPhone cases are a dime a dozen, but what caught our attention are companies with a commitment to sustainability.

Shenzhen Bobotel Technology

Take Shenzhen Bobotel Technology for example, who makes eco-friendly cases made of wheat straw — a biodegradable alternative to traditional plastic.

They can make cases for your iPhone, Samsung, or Huawei phones, in any color you desire. Each case starts at 90 cents at a minimum order of 50 units.

C&V Global

Guangzhou-based C&V Global offers similar products, too. The company has been certified by the Global Recycled Standard.

They have iPhone cases made from recycled plastic waste. In its purest form, it looks like a simple, clear jelly case but it can come in a variety of colors in both matte and glossy finishes.

They also make biodegradable cases made of wheat straw or bamboo fiber and thermoplastics. These cases can be engraved with your favorite pro-environment slogans as well.

The product decomposes naturally after two years if you decide to discard them. You can buy the cases through CTunes.


Global Sources Consumer Electronics is the world’s largest electronics sourcing show bridging suppliers and resellers. For more information visit GlobalSources.com.

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Global Sources: UNIQ Charging Solutions

Stay unique through great design

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It’s easy to get lost in a sea of similar products nowadays. One way brands can stand out is through great design. Just take a look at Singaporean designer brand Uniq. This brand creates stylish mobile accessories without sacrificing function.

Its product portfolio ranges from fast charging power banks, wireless chargers, phone cases, travel adapters, and other accessories.

For instance, Uniq has the Fuele series, which are power banks that have built-in power delivery capable of up to 66W fast charging. There’s also the Hyde Series, which is all about wireless charging power banks with hidden stands.

Check out the rest of their portfolio on uniqcreation.com


Global Sources Consumer Electronics is the world’s largest electronics sourcing show bridging suppliers and resellers. For more information visit GlobalSources.com.

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Accessories

Global Sources: Dono Hamburger Speaker

Packed with meaty and juicy features

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Who can resist a speaker shaped like a hamburger?

Meet Dono from Icarer Family. This cute and unassuming hamburger is actually a Bluetooth speaker packed with meaty and juicy features.

It has a built-in 1800 mAh battery so you can take it wherever you go. It’s rechargeable through its USB-C port, and you can play music through its 3.5mm audio jack instead of just Bluetooth.

The speaker is perfect for when you have a get-together or out-of-town trips with your friends and families. It costs US$ 17 for a minimum of 10 orders.

If you’re looking for other products to satisfy your cravings, there are power banks, cute charging adapters, face massagers, tote bags, heat pads, electric toothbrushes, a cute dashcam for your car, and more.


Global Sources Consumer Electronics is the world’s largest electronics sourcing show bridging suppliers and resellers. For more information visit GlobalSources.com.

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