News

LG unveils G7+ ThinQ in Singapore

A better version of the original

Published

on

LG’s new flagship smartphone is now in Singapore, and we are in for a treat because it’s the LG G7+ ThinQ.

It has the same 6.1-inch FullVision HDR display with a QHD+ resolution as the LG G7 ThinQ’s shown in New York earlier this month. The dual camera setup is still a combination of a regular f/1.6 shooter for better low-light photos and an ultra-wide angle with an f/1.9 aperture. Both rear cameras have 16-megapixel sensors. For selfies, an 8-megapixel f/1.9 front-facing camera is neatly hidden in the notch.


The ThinQ branding means it’s the hub of LG’s AI efforts. Just like other top-of-the-line phones in 2018, it’s powered by a Snapdragon 845 processor.

The “+” has nothing to do with LG ambassadors BTS, unfortunately

So, you’re probably wondering what the “+” is for, right? Instead of 4GB of memory and 64GB of storage, the LG G7+ ThinQ will have 6GB of memory and a huge 128GB of internal storage.

The phone will retail for SG$ 1,198 (US$ 895) and will be available starting June 2 at M1, Singtel, StarHub and other authorized LG retailers.

The LG G7+ ThinQ comes in three colors: New Platinum Gray, New Aurora Black, and New Moroccan Blue. For those who will pre-order from May 22 to May 31, premium bundles worth over SG$ 400 (US$ 230) will be part of the package, including a fast-charging wireless charger, an LG Tone Infinim Bluetooth headset, and a BTS case.

The phone has also launched in Indonesia retailing for RP 11,499,000 with pre-orders starting on May 30. Those who pre-order will get phone cases, a wireless charger and B&O earphones.

SEE ALSO: LG G7 ThinQ Hands-on: Ticks all the boxes

Enterprise

We’re not replacing Android yet, Huawei says

HongMeng is not the replacement system

Published

on

Amidst the long-standing Trump saga, Huawei has quietly developed its own operating system. Or so we thought.

Weeks earlier, Google blacklisted Huawei from its services, heralding a premature end to the latter’s Android support. Naturally, Huawei needed a more reliable replacement. Besides third-party replacements, the company supposedly started developing a completely new operating system. According to rumors, the future system will carry the name “Ark” or “HongMeng.”


Of course, as we know now, Huawei’s landmark ban as short-lived. Recently, Trump reversed his decision. Huawei’s Android support lives on — at least, for the immediate future. However, despite the optimism, Huawei isn’t resting on its laurels. HongMeng’s rumor mill kept grinding news every day. Most notably, Huawei was reportedly gearing for a late 2019 launch.

Out of nowhere, Huawei has finally addressed the torrent of rumors. HongMeng isn’t an Android replacement. At least, not yet.

According to senior vice president Catherine Chen, the operating system is not designed for smartphone use. For the meantime, Huawei is working closely with Google for continued support.

In another report, chairman Liang Hua comments on the company’s indecision regarding the operating system. Huawei still hasn’t decided if HongMeng can fit into the Android ecosystem. Further, he clarifies the system’s true nature. Apparently, HongMeng is software meant for industrial IoT devices. Whatever Huawei’s replacement operating system is, it’s not HongMeng.

Regardless, Huawei’s HongMeng system should be a lessened priority for the company. Huawei is still riding on both optimism and a need for damage control. If anything, Huawei is tying up its loose ends before its next big move.

SEE ALSO: Huawei can still get banned again in the future

Continue Reading

News

Google, Facebook could be tracking your porn

Incognito isn’t as safe as you think

Published

on

It’s become increasingly easy to access porn. And no, don’t give me that “it’s blocked” excuse. When it comes down to it, we all find ways. 😏

However, if you want to keep your porn activity to yourself, you might have to be more creative. CNET reported on a Microsoft research saying it analyzed over 20,000 porn sites and and found that 93 percent of them leak user data to a third party.


But you’re on incognito mode, right? It doesn’t help. The researchers pointed out that going on incognito mode only prevents your device from storing the sites you went to. The tracking happens elsewhere.

The biggest benefactors of your sexy time data are Google and Facebook. Specifically, it’s one of the companies under Google called DoubleClick that had trackers on porn sites. They are reportedly tracking 74 percent of the sites examined. Facebook, meanwhile, was tracking 10 percent of the sites.

Data too personal

One of the researchers who worked on the study told The New York Times that the tracking works so similarly to online retail and said that it should be “a huge red flag.” You might not realize it but the ads you’re being served may have been gleaned from your porn consumption.

CNET reached out to Facebook and they responded with the following statement:

“We don’t want adult websites using our business tools since that type of content is a violation of our Community Standards. When we learn that these types of sites or apps use our tools, we enforce against them.”

This is another one of Google’s many security issues. Just recently, reports found that more than 1,000 apps are mining your data. They also admitted to listening in on your conversations through Google Home.

The company has yet to comment on the story but it looks like they have plenty to answer for.

Continue Reading

Enterprise

These are the best cities for women entrepreneurs to thrive

Singapore ranks third in Asia Pacific, behind Sydney and Melbourne

Published

on

At the 10th annual Dell Women Entrepreneur Network Summit in Singapore, Dell announced findings of the 2019 Women Entrepreneur Cities (WE Cities) Index, ranking 50 global cities on their ability to foster growth for women entrepreneurs. Dell ranks cities based on the impact of local policies, programs, and characteristics in addition to national laws and customs to help improve support for women entrepreneurs and the overall economy.

Building on 10 years of research on women entrepreneurs, Dell partnered with IHS Markit to research and rank 50 cities on five important characteristics, including access to Capital, Technology, Talent, Culture and Markets.


The San Francisco Bay Area outranked New York for the No. 1 spot this year, mostly due to the city being one of the best places for women to gain access to capital. It also moved from 6th place to 2nd place in Culture, showing that the number of role models and public dialogue around eliminating the “bro culture” is making an impact.

Lack of funding, high cost of living, low representation of women in leadership roles and the lack of government-led policies that support women entrepreneurs were among the barriers globally.

Cities in the Asia Pacific (APAC) region are improving alongside all other cities globally, but still have a long way to go. Singapore, one of the only three cities from Southeast Asia to make it to the top 50, saw the highest improvement in the Talent pillar, as it benefitted from increasing its top school and business school rankings, as well as its pool of professionals needed to help scale businesses.

APAC cities mainly fell behind in the pillars for Culture and Markets. Despite making the top 50, Singapore’s Culture score was relatively low due to fewer female role models or leaders, although it’s still more advanced than majority of its neighbors in addressing gender parity issues.

Singapore ranks only No. 47 globally for the Markets pillar, because of the high cost of living in the city despite the lack of accelerators and relatively few female board members.

The WE Cities Index serves as a diagnostic tool to advise policy-makers on how to better support women in business.

“By arming city leaders and policymakers with actionable, data-driven research on the landscape for women entrepreneurs, we can collectively accelerate the success of women-owned businesses by removing financial, cultural and political barriers,” says Karen Quintos, EVP and chief customer officer at Dell Technologies.

The same way US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg argued in her landmark cases that gender discrimination hurts men and women alike, Singapore Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Grace Fu also emphasized at the summit that it’s not only women who want a better work life balance; men also want to be able to spend more time with their families.

This is where technology comes in. Technology, as a gender-neutral enabler, helps drive progress in gender equality by creating a level playing field, says Amit Midha, President of Asia Pacific & Japan, Global Digital Cities at Dell Technologies. It’s important to empower and invest in women not just because it’s been proven time and again that women help economies grow, but also because doing so benefits men and society as a whole.

SEE ALSO: Inspiring quotes from Dell Women Entrepreneur Network Summit 2019

Continue Reading

Trending