Samsung’s pair of Galaxy S8 smartphones didn’t just change the landscape for flagships to come, but also upped prices like never before. As nice as they are to look at, they’re simply too expensive for the average consumer. Suddenly, Samsung’s midrange lineup is looking a lot more attractive.

Right smack in the middle is the 2017 edition of the Galaxy A5. It’s significantly better than the Galaxy A3 (2017) and Galaxy J7 Prime, yet not as close to premium pricing as the Galaxy A7 (2017) and Galaxy C9 Pro. Those are a lot of options, Samsung!

We’ve had the Galaxy A5 (2017) for a couple of months now, and feel like it’s more relevant than it ever was, especially with the shifting price points. I’ve broken down my test notes into several major points.

A nice throwback design to older Galaxies

It’s getting increasingly difficult to remember a time Samsung wasn’t focusing on curved displays to set itself apart — or, well, actually, before the Galaxy Note Edge started it all about two years ago. The newest Galaxy A5 has none of that, and instead settles for a traditional flat 5.2-inch display with moderately rounded edges.

While you could call this a lazy design choice, I appreciate the traditional feel of a phone that doesn’t try to cut my palms or slide off a table. The bezels may be on the thick side, but the bottom part is taken up by the navigation buttons and fingerprint scanner, which, by the way, is in its rightful spot — right, Samsung?

Class-leading protection from the elements

Looking past the so-so design, the real highlight here is the water and dust resistance. This Galaxy A5 is one of the few midrange smartphones to have such protection, and this can be a game-changer for those who need an IP68 rating without spending too much.

Dated software no one wants

The only thing more aggravating than a heavily bloated operating system is old software. The Galaxy A5, fortunately, isn’t a culprit of the former, but it does suffer from this sickness wherein it still doesn’t have Android 7.0 Nougat, which has been available way before the 2017 version of this phone launched. Marshmallow is fine, although the battery-saving features and more streamlined notifications and settings menu are exclusive to the newer version.

Yet another great display

Making up for the aging software is Samsung’s usual AMOLED display with its super-deep blacks and Full HD 1080p resolution. The good thing is you can adjust the tone of the screen through a simple setting, although Adaptive mode gets the job done 99 percent of the time.

A very well-placed loudspeaker

If there’s one thing the Galaxy J7 Prime did right, it’s the placement of its sole speaker, and the Galaxy A5 follows suit. The convenience of having it on the side, right beside the power button, is such a pleasure; no more blocking sound while holding the phone in either portrait or landscape orientation. If not for the blemish it creates on the frame, I bet Samsung would apply this placement on all its other phones.

Just the right specs

I admittedly had to check the specs sheet to figure out where the Exynos 7880 stands in Samsung’s line of in-house processors. Based on benchmark apps, it’s surprisingly slower than the what’s found in the much older Galaxy S6. I’m not complaining, though; outside of games like NBA 2K17 where graphics must be set to Medium at best, overall performance was snappy from launching the camera to multitasking.

You can’t, however, overwhelm the run-of-the-mill 3GB of memory. With more and more midrange phones adapting at least 4GB at this point, I expected better. On the bright side, 32GB of storage — which you can expand using any microSD you have lying around — is the base amount, giving you more than enough room for all your essential apps.

Balanced front and rear cameras

Interestingly, the numbers for the main and front-facing cameras are very similar: 16 megapixels with a bright f/1.9 aperture for both. The only difference is there’s no autofocusing for the selfie cam, but not many phones can do that in the first place. Here are some samples:

The results are certainly more than satisfactory, and can easily compete or even beat most camera phones in this class. Disappointment only came when focusing on poorly lit subjects; it felt like an eternity waiting for the camera to lock on simple objects right in front of it.

Battery performance meant to impress

This wouldn’t be a truly good Samsung device without its signature fast-charging. Topping up from zero to full takes less than two hours for the 3000mAh battery. And once you have a hundred percent, the Galaxy A5 can last as long as two days on moderate usage, but that’s if you have the Always On feature turned off. By having the time, date, and battery percentage constantly plastered on the screen even while asleep, you should expect an empty tank before going to bed.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

As I mentioned earlier, the Galaxy A5 (2017) is in a sweet spot, right at the center of every other Samsung offering. What makes this one special is its water and dust resistance. Sure, the more affordable Galaxy A3 (2017) has it too, but its specs are nowhere near as capable as the A5’s.

And that’s the beauty of the Galaxy A5: It’s so well rounded, there’s no need for it to impress you with anything more. At $400 in most markets (PhP 19,990 for the particular model I reviewed in the Philippines), it’s a fair deal until you look at some of the Chinese alternatives.

Vivo’s V5 Plus first comes to mind with its highly efficient Snapdragon 625 processor, 4GB of RAM, 64GB base storage, and best of all, dual-selfie cameras. That’s impressive for a phone that costs exactly the same as the new Galaxy A5.

There’s also the larger and beefier Galaxy A7 (2017). For an additional $80 (PhP 4,000), you get a 5.7-inch screen and 3600mAh battery. Not much of jump, so it’s just a matter of size preference.

SEE ALSO: Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+ review

SEE ALSO
Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+ review

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