Enterprise

UK’s largest telco removes all Huawei equipment from core 4G network

The Chinese company continues to take hits

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Huawei smartphones are selling like hotcakes and are well-received by consumers and reviewers alike, although things are not looking good on the enterprise side. Earlier this year, the US started to make things hard for the Chinese company by labeling them as a threat. More countries have considered the warning, and everything has gone haywire ever since.

The latest related news is from the United Kingdom. The region’s largest mobile provider BT Group Plc plans to remove Huawei’s technologies and equipment from their core 4G network, according to a Financial Times report.

But, this doesn’t mean Huawei will be 100 percent wiped from the network. The report mentioned that BT will continue to use Huawei’s kit in what they consider to be benign parts of the network.

The telco’s move comes after the head of MI6 foreign intelligence service singled out the Chinese company as a potential security risk because of its alleged close ties with the Chinese government, something both parties deny.

BT said they have been in the process of removing Huawei equipment from instrumental parts of their 3G and 4G networks since 2016.

Furthermore, BT has decided to not include Huawei’s services in building the next-generation 5G network.

Via: Reuters

SEE ALSO: Huawei executive arrested in Canada, faces charges in US

Enterprise

Next iPhone might be delayed because of coronavirus

Some shops, factories are already closed

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The frightening coronavirus is on everyone’s radar. By now, you already know how to take care of yourself against this epidemic. Unless, of course, you’ve been living under a rock; in which case, stay there, because that’s the safest place for anyone.

The coronavirus is causing a lot of distractions across every facet of life: personal, commercial, industrial, political. Naturally, everyone wants to keep themselves safe from the epidemic.

In the commercial sphere, Apple is taking extra precautions against the virus. For one, Tim Cook has already limited his employee’s travels to China, unless necessary.

Further, Apple has also closed down one of its stores in China. “We have closed one of our retail stores and a number of channel partners have also closed their storefronts,” Cook said. Besides official Apple stores, licensed retailers have also begun shuttering their stores.

Unfortunately, the bleeding doesn’t stop there. The virus has now spread to the Hubei Province, near Apple’s major manufacturers. Currently, Apple has not announced any delays regarding their supply chain. However, some sources suggest that the virus will affect the upcoming iPhone 9’s production. (You might know the iPhone 9 by another name: the iPhone SE 2. At this point, Apple has not announced the new phone yet.)

If anything, major iPhone maker Foxconn has assured their facilities’ continued operations despite the virus scare. “We can confirm that we have measures in place to ensure that we can continue to meet all global manufacturing obligations,” according to a statement.

Regardless, the coronavirus’ impact on global events is inevitable at this point. Speed bumps are in the tech industry’s future, especially with the industry centering around China.

SEE ALSO: Apple shot a film entitled ‘The Daughter’ using an iPhone 11 Pro

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Enterprise

UK will allow Huawei to build 5G network

With a few exceptions

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Huawei and “banning” have become so synonymous today. Every headline practically begs the question: Who will ban Huawei next? When will Huawei catch a break?

To those following the entire saga, Huawei is already on the cusp of a much-needed breakthrough. Several countries are still on the fence regarding the Chinese company. The international outlook isn’t as bleak as the American one makes it seem.

Today, one of those ambivalent countries has made a decision. After meeting with the country’s National Security Council, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has allowed Huawei into its 5G network industry. The development comes after Brussels has reportedly made the same decision as well. (Belgium has not issued an official statement regarding its decision yet.)

Regardless of the initiating country, Johnson’s decision is conclusive. Like a stack of dominos, the world’s 5G industry is falling into place, in favor of Huawei. Naturally, no one wants to feel left out. “We want world-class connectivity as soon as possible,” British Digital Secretary Nicky Morgan said.

“But this must not be at the expense of our national security,” he continued. Despite the favorable decision, the UK remains vigilant regarding potential cybersecurity risks. Though allowed in the country, Huawei cannot touch the country’s “most sensitive networks.” These will likely include networks that specialize in transferring official information.

Previously, the country was on an on-and-off relationship with the Chinese company. For some moments, the UK considered a favorable decision from the get-go. For others, you noticed their warier side. Regardless, Huawei has landed a significant blow against America’s crusade against Huawei integration.

The US is still adamantly warning nations against adopting Huawei, encouraging them to implement bans just as they did. The country has even threatened to disconnect from countries that allow Huawei in. With the UK’s decision, will the US keep enforcing its iron fist against Huawei’s technology?

SEE ALSO: UK Prime Minister caught using a Huawei P20

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Enterprise

Vietnam’s Viettel develops its own 5G equipment

5G rollout in Vietnam imminent

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The race to 5G is on. Vietnam’s leading carrier, Viettel, just developed its own 5G equipment for use in the country’s transition towards the next-gen cellular service.

Vietnam becomes the sixth globally to develop its own 5G technology. Other countries that built homegrown infrastructure are Sweden’s Ericsson and Finland’s Nokia. Viettel’s development of its own 5G equipment makes it one of the few tech companies to have such capability.

Many countries in Southeast Asia, including the Philippines, are using Huawei infrastructure to launch their 5G service. Vietnam’s resistance to partnering with Huawei stems from its territorial dispute with Beijing over South China Sea.

The carrier will start the rollout in larger cities initially in June. Viettel also intends to use 5G equipment from Nokia for the initial rollout.

In the future, Viettel is looking to supply 5G equipment to its subsidiary carriers in countries like Myanmar and Cambodia. While some may interpret this as the carrier’s potential entry to the competitive 5G equipment market, it has to pay patent royalties owed to Huawei, Ericsson, and other companies.

Vietnam’s rollout of its homegrown 5G equipment is a clear break from other countries willing to pay tech companies for such. Since the Vietnamese government owns it, the carrier will subsidize the full rollout of 5G in the country.

Elsewhere, other countries are scrutinizing tech companies since 5G is a critical infrastructure that is supposed to be free from interference. Huawei has faced an entity ban in American soil over spying concerns regarding its own 5G equipment.

The Chinese company is also facing a similar ban in other countries, but it breathed a sigh of relief last October when the UK reconsidered Huawei for its own 5G rollout.

Source: Nikkei Asian Review

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