Two years ago, I was one of the few people fortunate enough to have an early sample of Lenovo’s Yoga 900 convertible. Needless to say, it drew a lot of attention both here and abroad for its sharp looks. Does the Yoga 910 attract as much praise? See for yourself.

Here’s how it looks in laptop mode

For when you just want to type

This is tent mode

For watching Netflix and chilling

And I’m not sure what this is called

You can also bend it further back for a full tablet mode

Bending is made possibly by the watchband hinge

Looks and feels great!

The trackpad is spacious enough and accurate

I didn’t have any trouble with gestures here

And the keyboard has nice travel

Coming from a mechanical keyboard enthusiast, I enjoyed using these keys

You can log in using its fingerprint scanner

It hasn’t failed me so far

These are the ports and buttons on the right

Power button, 3.5mm audio port, and full-sized USB port

While these are on the left

Two USB-C ports, one of which is for charging

A pair of speakers are found underneath

They get surprisingly loud with no distortion!

But how does it perform?

What’s a pretty convertible without performance to back it up? The unit we have here is equipped with Intel’s seventh-generation Core i7 processor, and it’s a real-deal CPU — not just one of those less-capable Core M processors found in most convertibles. There’s also 8GB of memory and 256GB of SSD storage inside.

Put all those together and you get a fast machine. It can cut through the increasingly bloated Chrome browser while handling several image files on Photoshop in the background. Startup is blitzy, too. But without a discrete graphics card, I don’t recommend using the Yoga 910 for high-resolution video editing.

How long does its battery last?

Not that long, unfortunately. A hundred percent charge provides me with enough juice to last a little over four hours of mixed use at a time. It also takes about as long to charge the Yoga 910 from zero, which isn’t great if you’re constantly on the go. The Ultra HD (3840 x 2160 pixels) resolution of our review unit is part to blame, so I’d expect the Full HD (1920 x 1080) version to do a little better.

Are there any deal-breakers?

There are three issues I have with the Yoga 910.

One: Its bundled bloatware is such a pain at times. It’s not as bad as what I had experienced on other Windows 10 laptops, but it’s annoying nonetheless. Lenovo has a history of pre-installing software that shouldn’t be there, and the trend continues.

Two: As pretty as the 13.9-inch edge-to-edge display is to look at, the awkwardly placed webcam below as a result isn’t. It’s a clear tradeoff we’ve been seeing since the Dell XPS 13 came out, and it’s not getting any better. The only remedy is to bend the Yoga 910 into tent mode, but then you’d lose the keyboard for chatting.

Three: This convertible gets really hot. I can’t leave this thing on my lap for more than 10 minutes without sweating excessively. The combination of the high-powered processor and full-aluminum chassis makes the Yoga 910 a perfect heater for cold climates — but not for the tropical weather I’m living in right now.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

As long as you know how to uninstall bloatware, don’t care much about video chat, and have a comfortable desk to rest it on, the Yoga 910 is a solid convertible for getting work done quickly.

It’s just a little pricey. The starting SRP is $1,200 which could be more after taxes, depending on where you live. Lenovo must have anticipated consumer reaction, and is also offering a more affordable, less exciting option.

The Yoga 900S takes advantage of the cooler Core M processor we mentioned earlier, and retails for up to $200 less. You just have to give up the Yoga 910’s addictive power and three-sided narrow bezels, but everything else is still there, including the bendy body and lovely port selection.

SEE ALSO: Lenovo Yoga Book hands-on review

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Lenovo Yoga Book hands-on review

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