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Huawei is willing to help Apple by selling them 5G modems

Despite the tension between their home countries

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The 5G race keeps on heating up. While we can’t easily buy a true 5G phone and use one on a real 5G network yet, manufacturers are very keen on delivering the next generation of mobile broadband.

Samsung and LG already have plans for a release this April, while Huawei and Xiaomi will follow suit in the coming months. Apple, on the other hand, might be having some trouble in creating a 5G-enabled iPhone with Intel as its partner.


Last week, we found out that both Qualcomm and Samsung have rejected Apple’s request to buy 5G modems due to some beef and supply issues. So, where does Apple turn to?

According to Engadget‘s source, Huawei is “open” in giving Apple a hand in 5G. The Chinese company is willing to sell its Balong 5000 5G modems. Quite surprising news really, considering the current issues between Huawei and the US government.

Apart from the US versus China fiasco, Huawei refuses to sell their powerful home-baked processors and other chipsets to competitors. Also, the Balong chip is designed for Huawei’s own IoT products and phones. If this is true, Apple is getting special treatment here.

Again, this is merely a rumor which is unsurprisingly juicy. Both Huawei and Apple are yet to give official statements or information on an upcoming deal. Let’s not forget that MediaTek is also an option.

SEE ALSO: Huawei executive caught using Apple products

Enterprise

Huawei secretly worked with North Korea on spying tech

Here we go again

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In the 2014 film The Interview, director Seth Rogen depicted North Korea as a backwards country incapable of basic human rights. The Hollywood depiction echoed the political sentiments of the present age — that North Korea falls behind most nations on several levels. Prejudices can, of course, be deceiving. According to a new report, North Korea isn’t the backwards country that everyone thinks it is.

Apparently, North Korea received invaluable help from outside technology — Huawei. As reported by The Washington Post, Huawei has secretly worked with the North Korean government for the latter’s wireless communications technology. Partnered with China-based Panda International, Huawei has engaged in North Korean business deals for at least eight years.


In 2008, then-leader Kim Jong Il discretely struck a deal with Huawei. The latter would help establish the North Korean telecommunications provider, Koryolink. Huawei became the country’s main provider for technology. The company even shipped employees to North Korea, establishing an inconspicuous office at a local hotel.

According to a telling internal document, Huawei’s assistance went beyond mere technology providing services. In 2008, North Korea asked Huawei for a spying algorithm; to which, the latter agreed. Huawei created an encrypted algorithm that allowed the government to intercept and monitor all calls made using Koryolink.

Huawei’s involvement went through all the protocols of secrecy. Internally, they struck all mentions of North Korea, hiding behind codes. (For example, “Country A9” would refer to North Korea.) Naturally, when America cracked down on North Korea in 2016, Huawei withdrew from all its North Korean offices, leaving current business deals hanging.

Huawei’s current troubles stem from its alleged involvements with blacklisted countries. Before its recent obsession with cybersecurity, the American government sought sanctions against Huawei for dealing with Iran and North Korea. The government, however, could never pin anything conclusive against the company. The recent ban stems from a different concern.

Of course, this latest report is a huge monkey wrench in the geopolitical machine. Both China-US and North Korea-US relations are already tense. Huawei’s North Korean involvement can potentially cause ripples throughout both fronts. For one, Trump already relinquished his iron grasp on Huawei recently. Will his tone change after today’s report? Will we see Huawei banned again? The Huawei saga continues.

SEE ALSO: Huawei is firing hundreds of workers

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Xiaomi makes the Fortune Global 500 list for the first time

It is the youngest company on the list

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How do you define a company’s success? For most people, success is landing the top spot: in being the best among competitors. Of course, there can only be one top dog. In chasing the number one spot, sometimes the journey is the success story in itself.

Backed up with years of experience, Xiaomi is making the necessary steps towards its own success story. For the first time in its nine-year existence, the Chinese company has made the Fortune Global 500 list of companies.


Currently, Xiaomi ranks as the 468th largest company, raking in a revenue of US$ 26,443.50 million and a net profit of US$ 2,049.10 million. In specific categories, Xiaomi is also the seventh-best company in the Internet and Retailing category.

At only nine years old, Xiaomi is the youngest company in the 2019 batch. It joins long-standing companies like Samsung (US$ 36,575.40 in net profit) and Apple (US$ 48,351.00 in net profit).

Additionally, Xiaomi is no stranger to Fortune’s lists. Back in June, the company also made the Fortune China 500 list, ranking 53rd overall. Needless to say, 2018 was a big year for the Chinese company.

Outside of Fortune, Xiaomi has made its mark elsewhere. Currently, the company is a huge player in international shipment and sales rankings. Xiaomi is on the rise. With a little luck, they should climb higher by the next fiscal year.

SEE ALSO: Xiaomi starts teasing Android One powered Mi A3

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We’re not replacing Android yet, Huawei says

HongMeng is not the replacement system

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Amidst the long-standing Trump saga, Huawei has quietly developed its own operating system. Or so we thought.

Weeks earlier, Google blacklisted Huawei from its services, heralding a premature end to the latter’s Android support. Naturally, Huawei needed a more reliable replacement. Besides third-party replacements, the company supposedly started developing a completely new operating system. According to rumors, the future system will carry the name “Ark” or “HongMeng.”


Of course, as we know now, Huawei’s landmark ban as short-lived. Recently, Trump reversed his decision. Huawei’s Android support lives on — at least, for the immediate future. However, despite the optimism, Huawei isn’t resting on its laurels. HongMeng’s rumor mill kept grinding news every day. Most notably, Huawei was reportedly gearing for a late 2019 launch.

Out of nowhere, Huawei has finally addressed the torrent of rumors. HongMeng isn’t an Android replacement. At least, not yet.

According to senior vice president Catherine Chen, the operating system is not designed for smartphone use. For the meantime, Huawei is working closely with Google for continued support.

In another report, chairman Liang Hua comments on the company’s indecision regarding the operating system. Huawei still hasn’t decided if HongMeng can fit into the Android ecosystem. Further, he clarifies the system’s true nature. Apparently, HongMeng is software meant for industrial IoT devices. Whatever Huawei’s replacement operating system is, it’s not HongMeng.

Regardless, Huawei’s HongMeng system should be a lessened priority for the company. Huawei is still riding on both optimism and a need for damage control. If anything, Huawei is tying up its loose ends before its next big move.

SEE ALSO: Huawei can still get banned again in the future

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