Reviews

Motorola Moto G5S Plus Review: Handsome and well-built

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The borderless trend has invaded the midrange smartphone segment. Those extremely thin bezels are glorious to gaze at, but Motorola is still not on board this trend. The Moto G5S Plus relies on good looks, a sturdy build, and smooth user experience to take on other phones in its class.

Let’s dive in and see how this midrange competitor fairs as a daily driver in this review.

The front has a beautiful 5.5-inch Full HD display

The rounded and swift fingerprint reader is also a nice touch

On its left is the hybrid card tray while the physical buttons are on the right

You’ll have to choose between a second SIM card or a microSD card

The micro-USB, loudspeaker, and main microphone are at the bottom

The all-metal unibody is glorious to the touch

The phone feels super solid!

Its dual rear cameras are quite intriguing to look at

It appears to be smiling back at you

It runs Android Nougat with no bloatware!

A couple of Moto apps are installed, but they are very useful

It’s built like a tank

When I first held the Moto G5S Plus, I instantly felt how well-built the phone is. My very own Moto E (second generation) still works perfectly after years of use and abuse despite being a budget plastic phone, and it looks like the Moto G5S Plus will be no different. The metal unibody construction leaves a lasting impression every time I pick up the phone. It doesn’t have a water-resistance rating, but it has a nano-coating making the phone virtually splash-resistant.

There’s not much to say about the design of the device since it’s not that different from other Motorola handsets in the market, and it doesn’t belong in the near-borderless category. But the 1080p display shows pleasing quality with just about any content you play on it. Too bad it doesn’t have stereo or front-facing speakers.

Above average midrange performance

On paper, the Moto G5S Plus easily sits in the popular midrange segment with a Snapdragon 625 processor, 4GB of memory, and 32GB of expandable storage. It holds up well or even better than similarly specced phones.

With my week of use, I never had any lags or hiccups. This is probably due to the clean installation of Android Nougat. Motorola has always been treating its devices with pure Android and just a few customizations on the side. I tried a number of games ranging from casual to graphics-intensive like our favorite Asphalt Extreme and the Moto G5S Plus was able to deliver smooth gameplay. High settings in NBA 2K17 caused it to stutter a bit, but it was manageable. It’s important to note that it doesn’t heat up (it just gets warm) even after hours of continuous gaming.

Dual cameras don’t do well

While the Moto G5S Plus doesn’t have a full-screen display, it does have dual rear cameras which look like a smiley when paired with the two-tone LED flash. Both rear sensors are 13 megapixels and, as always, the two work together to capture a detailed image with depth information. You’ll have to select the “depth enabled” mode in the camera launcher to take advantage of the two lenses and capture with background blur. For selfies, an 8-megapixel shooter takes on the job along with its own LED flash to help in the dark.

Photos look great when viewed on the device, but looking closer on a desktop monitor shows how simply above-average they are. Colors are well-saturated, but the noise-reduction is quite high, resulting in loss of details. There’s also noticeable shutter lag when shooting, especially with depth enabled. Unfortunately, the secondary sensor doesn’t do it justice, because of the poor cutouts of subjects. Maybe a software update will be able to fix the mediocre depth sensor, but for now, it just feels gimmicky. The selfies are generally okay, but not exactly the best around.

There’s a ‘Plus’ factor to its battery

With its 3000mAh battery, the phone is a winner when it comes to longevity. The phone also features Motorola’s quick charging tech called TurboPower with an included fast charger out of the box. Surprisingly, it works well with other quick chargers too, like Qualcomm’s QuickCharge 3.0.

With average use, the Moto G5S Plus can last for as long as two days on a single charge. If you’re a heavy user (like me), you can get around eight hours even with mobile data constantly on and apps like Facebook, Instagram, or Gmail refreshing in the background. Battery life is just impressive, but I think Motorola could’ve squeezed in a larger capacity in a device this size.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

The Moto G5S Plus is a polarizing midrange handset. The phone doesn’t have a near-borderless display, but it has amazing build quality; the dual rear cameras don’t live up to expectations, but the battery can last you a whole day. There’s always a caveat to consider with this phone.

If you’re looking for a well-built device which looks handsome, has a clean Android version with promised updates, and bears a trusted name, you should look into the Moto G5S Plus. It’s best to check it out in person to appreciate the build of the phone, and the camera issues might be addressed through a patch (assuming Motorola will fix it).

The phone sells for US$ 350 in the US, PhP 14,999 in the Philippines, and INR 15,999 in India.

Erratum: It was originally stated that the phone has 3GB of memory, but the actual specs have 4GB. We apologize for the error.

SEE ALSO: Motorola patented a display that repairs itself

Reviews

Xiaomi Redmi 5 Plus (Redmi Note 5) Review

New face, familiar performance

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Xiaomi’s latest budget offering finally arrived in our office and I used it as my daily driver to see if it lives up to its hype. We all know Xiaomi offers the best specs to price ratio, but is the Redmi 5 Plus (known as the Redmi Note 5 in India) the new budget phone king?

The Redmi 5 Plus is all about its new 5.99-inch 18:9 display

Embracing the latest tall display trend

It’s supposed to be a “near-borderless” phone but the bezels are still quite thick

The chin is thicker than the forehead

On top of the phone are the audio port, secondary microphone, and IR blaster

Xiaomi sticks with infrared for controlling appliances

At the bottom are the aging micro-USB port and loudspeakers

When will Xiaomi shift to USB-C for their budget phones?

The power button and volume rocker are on the right side

Both have the same texture, so you’ll have to get familiar with them

The card tray on the left is a hybrid slot for nano-SIM and microSD cards

You can’t have the best of both worlds

The back houses the fingerprint sensor and primary camera along with the LED flash

The back is reminiscent of the predecessors

MIUI 9 is at the helm but still based on Nougat

The UI looks great on the longer display

Redmi embraces the new display ratio

Last year, we saw the trend of tall displays. The new 18:9 standard was not exclusive to the bezel-less flagships, as we have seen them even with midrange phones — then to budget devices. It’s expected that other budget-centric brands like Xiaomi will release their own for the masses, and that gave birth to the Redmi 5. The one we have here is the Plus variant which has a bigger IPS LCD with wide-viewing angles and good color reproduction.

I see Xiaomi as the pioneer of bezel-less phones with the Mi Mix, but they had to make some cuts to keep it within the range of Redmi phones. So, the Redmi 5 Plus still has some bezels all around the display. It’s noticeable that the bottom bezel or the chin is slightly thicker than the top.

As mentioned earlier, the back of the phone looks and feels like its predecessor. The front might look different thanks to the 18:9 display ratio and reduced bezels, but the back is oddly similar. If we are to compare the Redmi 5 Plus to the Redmi Note 4, the latter will just look stouter. The rear camera placement is the same, as well as the LED flash and fingerprint reader. Even the mixed aluminum and plastic build sports the same trick for seamless mixing.

The upgrade is mostly external

The real specs upgrade for the Redmi 5 series is found on the Redmi 5 Note Pro — not on this one. The Redmi 5 Plus (or Redmi 5 Note) is virtually identical to its predecessor with the same Snapdragon 625 processor, up to 4GB of memory, and up to 64GB of storage. Our review unit has the highest-end configuration with 4GB and 64GB of memory and storage, respectively. While the Snapdragon 625 is an efficient chipset, it’s already showing signs of aging.

The processor powering the phone was released back in 2016, and it’s been well-received especially on budget devices from Xiaomi. But with all the extra features that apps are getting, the phone might not be able to keep up for long. For instance, it’s a bit laggy when posting videos or Boomerang clips on Instagram Stories, and I’m getting longer waiting times when opening certain games. Software optimization could address these issues, though.

When it comes to gaming, you shouldn’t worry. The usual mobile games I play like Asphalt Extreme and NBA 2K18 ran fine even on high settings, but you’ll have to turn off some extra effects to get better frame rates. General phone use was also good with little to no hiccups.

The phone runs MIUI 9 out of the box but still based on Android 7.1 Nougat. While I can’t hate MIUI because of its speed and additional features on top of stock Android, it can get quite cumbersome at times with settings and permissions. MIUI 9 is a refinement of everything the MIUI team learned from previous versions and it’s still as colorful as before. There’s no news if it’ll get an update to Android 8.0 Oreo, but with MIUI 9 at the helm, it doesn’t really matter since you already have most of the new Android features and important security patches.

Typical Xiaomi-grade camera

Even with their flagship devices, Xiaomi can’t pull off superb quality shooters. So, what should we expect from their budget phones like the Redmi 5 Plus? The phone is equipped with a 12-megapixel primary shooter accompanied by a dual-tone LED flash. According to spec sheets, the aperture of the lens is just f/2.2 which is disappointing and it shows when shooting in dim environments. Night shots are also just so-so, so don’t expect the phone to capture plenty of details.

As for selfies, there’s a 5-megapixel front shooter that has the usual Xiaomi beauty effect that somehow doesn’t work well with my face, so I turned it off most of the time. It’s also not as wide as other selfie phones.

One thing I like about Xiaomi’s camera is its launcher. It’s pretty straightforward and simple. There are also a few modes you can jump into if you want to get the best possible shot depending on the subject.

Longevity is where the phone triumphs

Battery life is perhaps the most important aspect of an entry-level phone. If you’re sticking to a budget, you might not get the best camera but it should at least last the whole day on a single charge. With a 4000mAh battery, the Redmi 5 Plus can.

After using the phone as my daily driver for more than a week, I rarely looked for the charger. I don’t even worry about running out of juice while on the road. Based on actual usage, the phone can last for more than 24 hours with about eight hours of screen-on time. On a really busy day, the phone can do around 20 hours. If you’re wondering, my usage is all about mobile data. I connect to Wi-Fi from time to time when in the office and at home, but LTE is my savior when in public places.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

If you’re a Redmi fan looking for an upgrade, you might want to skip this one. The true upgrade is found on the Redmi Note 5 Pro with its latest processor and familiar-looking rear cameras. If still available, you can opt for the good old Redmi Note 4 which is supposedly cheaper now with the new releases in the market.

Honestly, it’s disappointing to see Xiaomi recycling their design for the budget series. The Redmi 5 Plus doesn’t bring anything new to the table even with its 18:9 display. But, that could have been the point of the phone all along since they released the Redmi Note 5 Pro shortly after.

The Redmi 5 Plus starts at CNY 999 or around US$ 150 for the base 3GB/32GB model, while the top-of-the-line 4GB/64GB variant sells for CNY 1,299 or about US$ 180. You can purchase the Redmi 5 Plus just like the one we have from GearBest.

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Camera Shootouts

GoPro HERO 6 Black vs HERO 5 Black Comparison

Which is the action camera for you?

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GoPro is one of the biggest names in sports videography and is a name that first comes to mind when the need for a portable, easy-to-set-up camera arises. Although, the past couple of years were a bit hard for the company as sales plummeted, and after introducing their first-ever drone, some literally fell from the sky.

Still working hard on making another hit, GoPro has returned with their latest action camera, the HERO 6 Black, and it boasts some pretty impressive features. Will it be the saving grace the company needs right now? How does it fare compared to its predecessor, the HERO 5? We answer those questions plus more in this comparison.

Design

On the outside, nothing has changed with the new action camera at all. It’s made of the same robust, rubbery material that’s designed to go underwater for as deep as 10 meters without needing an extra waterproof case. Button placements are carried over — one up top to start recording and another one on its side to switch between shooting modes.

Underneath, the same 1220mAh battery is stored while connectivity ports are on the other side. Even the protective lens is still removable and replaceable. There’s virtually no way of telling the two apart except for the small print on the side of the camera.

Features

The biggest upgrade of the HERO 6 has more to do with output. It can now shoot up to 4K resolution at 60fps, whereas the previous HERO 5 topped out at 4K 30fps. It might seem like a small detail but having the option to shoot smoother video is always a good thing.

Another difference is frame rate. The HERO 5 Black can capture videos at a speedy 240fps but resolution is limited to 720p. The newer HERO 6 Black, on the other hand, can shoot the same 240fps rate at a clearer 1080p resolution.

For more flexibility, the HERO 6 can also shoot at 2.7K at 120fps so you get nice slow-mo video with the ability to resize or re-scale your footage if the need arises. Other features that differentiate the new action camera from its predecessor include better low-light performance and dynamic range.

Video Sample

Of course, all this means nothing if we can’t see for ourselves. I brought both cameras during my travels and you may refer to the embedded video below (starting at 2:46) for some sample video comparisons.

You can easily see that the sky from the HERO 6’s shots is more vibrant than the pale blue color from the HERO 5. There’s also a noticeable difference in exposure. The HERO 5 has darker blacks which, in this case, worked well since it was able to bring out more details on the snowy mountain.

Although both are set to auto white balance, footage from the HERO 5 still turns out to be warmer as seen in the indoor shoot.

In terms of stabilization, the new HERO 6 really stepped up its game to remove unwanted jerks and jitters. The difference is day and night, and it’s impressive how the HERO 6 almost looks like it was mounted on a gimbal thanks to its electronic image stabilization.

Don’t get us wrong, the HERO 5 also has its own EIS, but just not as good as the new flagship’s.

One more thing to notice when the camera’s EIS is turned on is that the HERO 5 needs to crop the image by 10 percent to achieve a smoother shot, while the HERO 6 has improved this and only crops about 5 percent of the original image.

Additionally, stabilization on the HERO 5 can only be used until 2.7K resolution at 60fps, while the HERO 6 supports stabilization until 4K. The only limitation here is that EIS maxes out at 30fps with no support for the higher 60fps.

Onto low-light shooting: Footage taken with the older HERO 5 couldn’t achieve the same level of clarity shot on the HERO 6. Colors are also livelier and digital noise has been reduced significantly on the latter.

Although there were instances, like when we went ice skating, that we preferred the color and details shot by the HERO 5. It looked more natural and the ice on the floor is still visible, unlike the one shot by the HERO 6.

Photo Samples

We now look at some photo samples from both action cameras.

This photo was taken at Italy’s oldest shopping mall and shows a good balance between light and dark areas. We like how the HERO 5 has a higher contrast which added detail to the metal structure of the mall. 

While waiting for a train, we see the sun lighting the Swiss Alps from behind with a dark and shaded station in the foreground. Again, we see a more vibrant blue sky from the HERO 6 with good details.

But look closer on the warning sign in front of you and the HERO 5 was actually able to deliver a better, more legible image. Even when you crop them to 100 percent, the smallest details seem to appear better on the HERO 5.

At night, both proved to be capable shooters, but the HERO 6 showed more details by effectively capturing the cracks on the floor. One thing that I had been complaining about with my HERO 5 is that it easily overshoots light flares, creating an unwanted glow and losing details.

It’s very much distracting here since it washed out the person’s face. Meanwhile, we’re happy that it was addressed on the HERO 6 as it’s clearly the better photo.

Zooming in to 100 percent shows that the green motorcycle has a livelier color and less noise on the HERO 6 compared to its predecessor. Here are more sample photos:

Battery Life

As mentioned earlier in this video, the HERO 6 Black carries the same 1220mAh battery capacity as the HERO 5 Black. So it should technically last for the same amount of time right? Well, no.

We conducted a battery test on the two at full capacities, same video settings, and started recording until they both drained their batteries. After more than an hour and a half, the HERO 6 actually gave up first at 1 hour and 42 minutes while the HERO 5 continued on and reached 2 hours and 5 minutes. That’s 23 minutes of difference and could go a long way in real-world shooting.

Responsible for this result might be the HERO 6’s newer custom processor. Yes, it could produce better dynamic range, low light shots, and stabilize the camera really well — but at the cost of a more power-hungry chip. That’s definitely a trade-off to consider.

Conclusion

So the question here is this: Should you upgrade to a HERO 6 Black from a HERO 5 Black?

Well, you first have to ask yourself the question: Will you be using it to shoot serious action scenes with really fast movement? Are you after the best quality there is? Or are you more of a casual user who just uses a sports camera to document your out-of-town trips?  

 

Because if it’s not for professional work, the HERO 5 Black is more than capable to document all your trips. It’s also worth every penny since it just dropped its price to US$ 299, making it a really attractive offering — not to mention longer battery life.

Although if you plan to use your action videos for broadcast and want to have a lot of flexibility in shooting and editing, then you can’t go wrong with the HERO 6 Black at US$ 399.

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Reviews

Samsung Galaxy A8 and A8+ (2018) Unboxing and Review

Impressive but expensive

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We’re only a few weeks away from Mobile World Congress 2018 in Barcelona where Samsung will be launching its next flagship smartphone, the Galaxy S9.

But not too long ago, Samsung also announced the Galaxy A8 and A8+ (2018), their latest upper-midrange Galaxy A smartphones.

In this review we discuss the phones’ design, camera performance, impressive battery life, and their price tags. So are they your GadgetMatch? Watch and find out!

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