Reviews

Realme 3 Pro review: ‘Pro’ models are indeed better

Is this your next gaming phone?

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Realme might be new (or maybe young) to the smartphone industry, but they’re already making a significant mark. As an OPPO sub-brand before, Realme was created to put up a fight in the budget segment. Just a few models later, they are now taking on the midrange segment with the Realme 3 Pro.

The Pro model of the Realme 3 might not look that different from the regular one, but it has lots of improvements that make it worthy of its “Pro” moniker.

How good is the Realme 3 Pro? Let’s find out in this review.

It has a 6.3-inch Full HD+ IPS display

Comes with a waterdrop notch

The volume buttons are on the left…

Two separate buttons for volume up and down

… along with the triple-card tray

It’s the perfect setup

The power button sits on the right

All the buttons are matte plastic

The bottom is busy with the micro-USB port, speaker, and 3.5mm jack

No USB-C but it has fast charging

The back sports a “3D Speedway Design”

Inspired by Le-Mans speedway

It looks pretty similar to the regular Realme 3

One of the cameras is highlighted by a yellow ring

Familiar with subtle elements

Like with most affordable phones in the midrange segment, the Realme 3 Pro feels plasticky, yet it’s solidly built. It has a 6.3-inch IPS LCD topped with Gorilla Glass 5 which should be able to withstand everyday scratches. With a Full HD+ resolution, the phone’s screen is sharp enough to display pleasing images.

If you’ve seen the Realme 3 (or read my review), the Realme 3 Pro will look really familiar. It shares a similar design to the brand’s budget phone, but it has a couple of improvements.

During my time with the Realme 3 Pro, I’ve noticed that it’s more comfortable to hold, probably due to its tapered side frame. Also, it has a special inner pattern on the back that’s noticeable under bright lighting. Unfortunately, the back is made of plastic and it’s prone to scratches.

Overall, the Realme 3 Pro’s physical aspect is respectable. It doesn’t have premium materials aside from the front glass, yet it’s well-built. Nothing is praisable here, but it’s not shabby either. Since Realme is generally sharing design cues with OPPO, I’m not expecting them to offer anything premium material-wise soon in this price range.

Flagship-grade, built for gaming

Inside, the Realme 3 Pro is so much different from its budget counterpart. It’s powered by a flagship-grade 10nm processor, specifically Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 710. Just last year, only expensive phones got to enjoy the efficiency of 10nm chips but it already has trickled down to the midrange segment.

What does this mean? Fast performance without the high cost. To makes things better, the Realme 3 Pro comes with up to 6GB of memory and up to 128GB of expandable storage.

The phone runs an updated version of ColorOS 6 which is based on Android 9 Pie. While ColorOS’ customization on top of Android doesn’t appeal much to most, it has noteworthy features like Hyper Boost 2.0 which intelligently optimizes gaming performance.

While we’re at it, Realme is promoting the Realme 3 Pro as a gaming smartphone. With its capable processor, better GPU (it has an Adreno 616), and gaming-focused software enhancements, the phone does deliver good gaming performance. PUBG: Mobile is set to high graphics settings by default and it runs without any hiccups. I also had no issues running Asphalt 9 and Mobile Legends.

Upgraded dual cameras

As a midrange phone, the Realme 3 Pro must have more than one rear camera. Thankfully, it has two: a main 16-megapixel shooter with an f/1.7 aperture and a 5-megapixel depth sensor. While the secondary camera is a bit of a letdown, the main sensor is impressive.

When there’s plenty of light to work with, the Realme 3 Pro can take stills with great detail and accurate color balance. AI scene detection is quick and it makes shooting in Auto mode a breeze. Moreover, the phone comes with a couple of extra modes like Nightscape for night shots and Chrome Boost for improved dynamic range.

Check out these samples:

For selfies, there’s a 25-megapixel front-facing camera inside the display’s notch. With its high pixel count, you can take sharp selfies with a number of beauty filters to suit your taste. Of course, it also AI mode that automatically adjusts everything.

The Realme 3 Pro’s camera performs great, but it could have been better if the depth sensor had an ultra wide-angle lens instead. We’ve seen wide-angle shooters on budget phones and other similarly priced midrangers, so it should have been possible with Realme’s.

VOOC is a must

OPPO’s proprietary fast charging tech has come to Realme phones. Even though the Realme 3 Pro still sports a micro-USB port, I can forgive it since it features VOOC 3.0. The phone ships with a 20W fast charger in the box, so you don’t have to spend extra for this.

It can quickly go from zero to 50 percent in around 30 minutes, while a full charge will take about an hour and 15 minutes.

How about battery life? I was able to lightly use the Realme 3 Pro for two days and was left with enough juice — around 15 percent — to let it stay awake overnight. A full workday shouldn’t be a problem for the phone’s 4045mAh battery.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

The Realme 3 Pro has a good display, fast processor, decent cameras, and quick charging speeds. With those already in check, what more could you ask for from a nice midrange phone that wouldn’t hurt your wallet?

Speaking of, the price starts at INR 13,999 in India or PhP 12,990 in the Philippines for the 4GB variant with 64GB of storage. If you want extra memory and storage, the 6GB+128GB model goes for INR 16,999 or PhP 14,990.

The Realme 3 Pro is not exactly the midrange phone to beat, though. The lack of an ultra wide-angle shooter is disappointing, but this smartphone is more of a gaming device than a camera-centric phone in the first place.

SEE ALSO: Realme X is a flagship-grade phone with a budget price tag

Reviews

Nokia 7.2 review: Quality above all

A no-brainer

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The Nokia 7.2 is the latest in the 7 series by HMD. In true Nokia fashion, it boasts of solid build quality, and as part of the Android One program, Nokia will be providing Android updates consistently as well. But the 7.2 is more than just another Nokia phone — its camera tells a different story.

Beautiful Nordic design with all the essentials

When you talk about Nokia, you think build quality and the Nokia 7.2 really does feel like a solid phone. There’s Gorilla Glass 3 on the front and back held together by a polymer composite frame, which Nokia says is twice as strong as polycarbonate and half the weight of aluminum. The phone is massive but still very comfortable to hold because of its rounded edges.

The Nokia 7.2 comes with a matte, frosted glass back in either Cyan Green or Charcoal. Both variants look elegant and the Cyan Green model that we have gives off that signature Nordic look expected of a Nokia.

At the back you’ll see a circular arrangement for the camera module with the ZEISS branding proudly shown off. Some people say this reminds them of recent Moto phones but this design language actually first popped up in Nokia’s Lumia line back in the day — first with the iconic Nokia Lumia 1020 PureView, and then a few more phones after that.

Button and port placements are located where they usually are. The power button on the right side also doubles as the notification LED light.

There’s a 3.5mm headphone jack at the top.

A tray for dual nano SIM cards and microSD card on the left. Below that you’ll find the Google Assistant button. There’s no way to officially remap it to something potentially more useful but if you’re a big Google Assistant fan then there’s a dedicated button just for that.

At the bottom, you also get a USB-C port. No compromises here.

Dated internals, no problem

The Nokia 7.2 is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 660, which is a little bit dated, it’s almost 2 years old and is the same one found in its predecessor, the Nokia 7 plus.

Nokia is not the only brand to use older, more reliable processors for many of their smartphones. Xiaomi was (in)famous for using the Snapdragon 625 for nearly three years.

A lot of people have criticized Nokia online for choosing the older Snapdragon 660 instead of something newer like the Snapdragon 675. This is not necessarily a bad thing. There are a lot of reasons companies do this, one of them is to ensure better tuned software that makes the best use out of that processor. Another is to get consistent software updates faster because they just have to adapt for a fewer number of processors.

Other brands like to market their phones as “super powerful” because they need the extra power in those processors to pull off their clunky Android AOSP skins on top of everything else. There also isn’t really that much of a dramatic difference between Snapdragon 660 and Snapdragon 675.

On top of this, the Nokia 7.2 runs Android One. There’s no clunky skin on top, so that processor has more space to work with, theoretically speaking.

In everyday operations I faced no slowdowns or lag at all on the Nokia 7.2, except for the camera. Everything else was quick and as smooth as you’d expect on a phone in this price range. You can still play PUBG Mobile just fine, but I’d stick to medium settings.

The phone comes with either 4GB or 6GB of RAM, with either 64GB or 128GB of internal storage respectively. There’s the microSD card slot incase you want additional storage.

The Nokia 7.2 runs Android 9 Pie out of the box, but since this is an Android One Phone, it should be getting Android 10 anytime soon.

Everything from the clock to the notification dropdown are all stock Android and the interface is bloat-free. It’s your usual standard Android homescreen with a swipe-up multi-tasking menu and app drawer. There’s multi-window support, and Google’s default apps for gallery and music, a file manager, and Google calendar, and even the FM radio app.

Nokia promises two major OS updates (so that’s Android 10 which should be coming soon, and Android 11 whenever that pops up next year), and an extra third year of monthly patches for the phone for a total 3 years of software support. This is huge compared to how most Android smartphone companies abandon their non-flagship smartphones after a year or so.

Clunky but really good cameras

The triple camera setup at the back is the most important feature of the Nokia 7.2. It has the 48MP Quad Bayer sensor, which Nokia calls Quad Pixel, behind an f/1.8 aperture lens. Along with that there’s an 8MP 118-degree ultra wide-angle, and 5MP depth sensor, while at the front there’s a 20 megapixel selfie camera.

All four cameras have Zeiss optics. There’s prominent branding sitting in the middle of the camera lenses to remind you of it. There’s even bokeh modes inside the camera app that have the German optics brand’s name used — ZEISS Modern, ZEISS Swirl and ZEISS Smooth. These are for the bokeh modes that offer a DSLR-like portrait experience, which blurs not only the background but also the foreground. It also works at night and even if you have HDR enabled.

The ZEISS Bokeh styles look really unique and stylish and the Nokia 7.2 does a good job of separation between the subject and surroundings. You can change bokeh modes after taking the photo, so you can decide later what looks better.

The rear camera’s quality overall is really good, but the ultra-wide camera tends to lose details in low light situations.

You can opt to use the night mode in low light conditions. The phone can automatically detect if its handheld or on a tripod. It combines about 8-10 exposures in handheld, and up to 20 if on a tripod, to deliver better detail and HDR. This helps with noise reduction and dynamic range and it works with the ultra-wide angle camera too.

The selfie camera on the Nokia 7.2 also does a great job. I really loved the selfies I took with this phone.

Here are more sample photos.

Average battery life

Nokia proudly proclaims that you’ll get two days out of the 3500 mAh battery of the Nokia 7.2 and that’s mostly true. It’s not the largest that you’ll see in a phone this size but it’s much larger than the 3060mAh used in the Nokia 7.1.

With light to medium usage you’ll definitely get home every day with some solid amount of battery life percentage to spare. Even if you’re at the office and about to head out to meet friends on a sudden evening plan, you’ll feel confident knowing that the Nokia 7.2 will still last you throughout the evening.

But on moderate to heavy usage, you’ll definitely have to charge it up every night or risk it running out of battery early the next day.

Of course, if you’re going to be doing a lot of gaming or video-watching, you will see battery life go down faster than usual.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

With its new range of Nokia smartphones, HMD is really banking on build quality, and consistent software updates to compete against the razzle dazzle of its Chinese competitors. Nokia is also hoping to stand out in this very aggressive price range with the 7.2’s Zeiss-branded triple cameras. But are build quality and camera enough?

The honest answer is — it depends on the market you’re buying this phone in. If you’re considering the Nokia 7.2 on the American continent or Europe at EUR 249, go out and get it right now. It’s a great phone, and that camera is worth it. The only thing that comes close is the more expensive Pixel 3A.

In India and the rest of Asia, however, the Nokia 7.2 has a some very aggressive competition to deal with at almost exactly the same price range.

There’s the Realme XT which is a better phone in almost every way, except for camera quality. There’s also the Realme X — an all-screen phone with a pop-up selfie camera.

At the end of the day though, the Nokia 7.2 stands out in a sea of value for money midrange Chinese smartphones because of software support. They have a proven track record of keeping their phones updated and secure. If this is important to you, it’s a no-brainer.

Starting at INR 18,599 in India, and PhP 15,990 in the Philippines, the camera on the Nokia 7.2 is one of the best in its price range and the build quality is solid. If these all check the right boxes on your list, the Nokia 7.2 might just keep you happy for a very long time, and help you create some great memories along the way.

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Honor Band 5 Review: Reliable fitness companion

Counting steps was fun!

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We went hiking with the Honor Band 5 and I learned a few things about hiking, the fitness wearable, and myself — which is mostly just about how generally unfit I am.

The hike took place at Masungi Georeserve. It’s a conservation area in the Philippines that’s about 47 kilometers away from Metro Manila. One of the staff told us that during the prehistoric era, the entire reserve was submerged in water. Millions of years later, it’s now a mountain range inhabited by different species of plants, insects, and animals. Fun!

A view of a section of Masungi Georeserve

Unlike other trek sites, the Masungi Georeserve is  more… tamed. The rangers have built a path for curious hikers but if, like me, you have zero experience trekking or hiking, then don’t think for a second that this is going to be easy.

You need to have the right gear

The thing about having fitness goals (or just goals in general, really) are they need to be measurable for you to know your progress. With the Honor Band 5 slapped on my wrist, I was excited to find out several things but I didn’t expect to learn as much as I did when the hike wrapped up. More on this later.

MJ showing he has all the right gear for the hike

Another proper gear you need to take note of is your shoes. Just as there’s a pair meant for running, playing basketball, and training, there are also shoes made specifically for hiking.

I went out of my way to get a pair prior to the hike and it made a huge difference. I had a relatively easier time going through the terrain than some of the people I went with who wore regular running or training sneakers. This meant I had one less thing to worry about.

Getting started

Before we started, we first set up the Honor Band 5. To do so, you’ll need to download the Huawei Health app. Through the app you can see all your metrics as well as update the firmware and download more watch faces.

There were a variety of watch faces. They ranged from simple ones that just show you the time and the number of steps you’ve taken to those that showed the time, steps, and even heart rate.

For this particular trek, I wanted to check on my heart rate. I was happy to know it was still beating despite multiple failed romantic pursuits. In fact, it spiked more than I thought it would during the hike.

Design-wise, none of the watch faces really stood out. But there are enough options that I’m confident you’ll find something you’ll like and would want to stick with.

Tracking is insightful and fun

Onto to the hike! We were told it would take about four to five hours to complete the route. Naturally, we took longer than that. To completely track everything you need to go to workouts and choose outdoor walk.

The Honor Band 5 supports other workouts too like outdoor and indoor running, outdoor and indoor cycling, free training, and much more.

The trek had several stops — some were for resting, others were for the accompanying ranger to tell us more about the reserve. At each stop, I would check on the watch to see how many steps I’ve taken so far. Especially since the trail varies from straight and narrow paths to ones that require climbing.

The trek involved climbing down nets like this

Having the heart rate monitor up, I also made a conscious effort to check on my breathing. I’ve never really had strong lungs. Even when I still used to play basketball regularly when I was a lot younger, I was quick to run out of breath.

When I saw my heart rate going up so much higher than usual, I made it a point to stop for a while and take a few deep breaths to gather myself. The SpO2 Monitor2 also came in handy here. It detects your level of oxygen at different altitudes and thankfully mine stayed in the normal range for much of the trek.

There were too many of these nets. Not apparent in photo is the fear and dread I felt climbing down

Additionally, the colored amoled display on the Honor Band 5 made it easy to check on my numbers. This is also through even when it started to rain. I could still see the numbers clearly despite the watch being drenched.

The Honor Band 5 is water resistant for up to 50m. So not only can it survive the rain, it’s also made to accompany you during your swimming sessions.

Taking a closer look at the numbers

After the hike, you’ll need to stop the tracking so you get your entire workout summary. It took us nearly eight hours to complete the trek and the rest of my numbers are pretty interesting.

The Masungi Georeserve took our collective breaths in more ways than one

I took a total of 11,611 steps on an average cadence of 24 steps per minute with an average speed of 1.78km/h and an average heart rate of 129 bpm. If you thought that was confusing, it only means I’m about as out of shape as I expected myself to be.

You can check your data against what is supposed to be the average for a healthy human being. With this you can start working towards that goal. The idea is to gradually reach a state of being healthy and tracking your numbers will help you do that.

Other features and final thoughts

The Honor Band 5 also has a few other nifty features like Find Your Phone. Say you forgot where you last put your phone, the fitness band can ring it for you.

There’s also TruSleep tech that I didn’t get to try as much on this device but I did on the Honor Watch Magic so watch out for that article as well.

Just me trying to look triumphant midway through the hike

The Honor Band 5 promises up to 14 days of battery life. I had it on for a few more days post the trek and didn’t really charge it up until the 10th or 11th day. Which is still pretty darn good.

At PhP 1,699 (US$ 33), the Honor Band 5 lives up to its billing as your personal fitness tracker. The colored AMOLED display is great and the tracking is where you’d expect it to be. It’s also comfortable enough that you won’t mind having it on while you workout.

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Vivo V17 Pro Unboxing and Review

Overpriced and gimmicky?

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Vivo’s newest smartphone has cool camera features, including the world’s first dual pop-up selfie camera.

But is that enough for you to want to upgrade, or is the Vivo V17 Pro overpriced with a lot of gimmicks?

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