Reviews

Xiaomi Mi Note 10 Lite review: Feels like a space frontier

Lite in price, definitely heavy in features

Published

on

It’s been a while since I last tested a Xiaomi phone. I previously reviewed the Xiaomi Mi 9T and its Pro sibling, which both received outstanding marks. After almost a year, I finally have another chance to play with a Xiaomi device — this time it’s the Mi Note 10 Lite.

Don’t be confused. This isn’t the 108-megapixel-touting Xiaomi Mi Note 10. Instead, it has a lower but still respectable 64-megapixel Sony IMX686 sensor.

However, at less than the price of its big brother, you get the same Qualcomm Snapdragon 730G chipset with the option to get more RAM. But is it a smarter purchase? Just keep following the star trails to find out more.

A design that reminds me of the cosmos

The Mi Note 10 Lite (obviously) got its design cues from the Mi Note 10. The left-justified camera placement plus the gradient, flashy back are both familiar to other Android smartphones out there — but this phone still stands out on its own.

Upon seeing the Xiaomi Mi Note 10 Lite for the first time, it reminded me of a nebula that can be seen from a distant galaxy like ours. Cool enough, Xiaomi named this as the Nebula Purple colorway.

Those shimmering streaks that blend well with its dominantly purple gradient body are little details that remind me of my astronomical fascination since I was a kid. If this isn’t your cup of tea, you can get a more basic Midnight Black or a cleaner Glacier White option.

How come people love curved displays but not people with curves?

The inclusion of a 3D curved edge display is a nice design highlight for a smartphone that’s priced lower than most of its flat-display midrange competitors. Most might think of a waterfall when you see that “overflowing” display but for me, it’s more of a continuous flow of space — just like the universe.

Unlike the motorized pop-up cameras and newer punch-hole cameras, you get the old Dot Drop notch found on the Mi Note 10 and older Mi smartphones. It’s honestly not the best thing in the universe but that single piece of front camera for your selfies still gets the work done (more on that later).

Also, you can find another “old” feature which is the IR port that’s responsible for making this phone a universal remote.

They now use the new Xiaomi logo instead of the old “Mi” logo

It’s not the lightest phone you can hold as it’s literally hefty. In fact it felt heavier than my iPhone XR. Over time, I just got used to it as the “thicc” body serves its purpose. Overall, the Mi Note 10 Lite’s design is cohesive — a perfect balance between aesthetics and ergonomics.

The illusion of an ever-expanding display just like the universe

What a perfect time to watch Cosmic Girls’ new music video

Just like the Mi Note 10, it has the same 6.47-inch 3D Curved AMOLED display with Full HD+ resolution. Other than that, you also get an Always-On Display feature for better information and notification support.

What trims down the display quality is the level of brightness nits. The Mi Note 10 has a maximum brightness of 600 nits while the younger sibling only has 430 nits — which is enough for indoor usage but looks washed out when you’re outside with direct exposure to sunlight.

For display nerds, this isn’t equipped with a buttery smooth 120Hz refresh rate. The standard refresh rate may look normal to most consumers though. But, it’s still disappointing as the Poco X2 is equipped with a high refresh rate display even if it’s a lot cheaper.

When a dialogue in Hospital Playlist is more relevant than my whole existence

Anyhow, watching on its big display still delivers vibrant colors with whiter whites and deeper blacks — as dark as the center of the black hole.

Other than enjoying the colorful and visually-stunning music video of Cosmic Girls’ “Butterfly” on YouTube, there’s also a certain level of viewing pleasure when you watch Netflix series, especially that this phone supports HDR10 for most titles.

As someone who has big hands, there’s a palm rejection feature which is flawless as it doesn’t touch screen items even when I grip the edges of the display.

Performance as fast as a rocket launch

As fast as falling in love with the wrong person

The moment I heard that the Mi Note 10 Lite packs the Snapdragon 730G chipset coupled with 6GB of RAM (which is the same as the Mi Note 10), I immediately tested its processing power.

Surprisingly, it’s decent enough for graphically demanding games. In my case, I tried playing my favorite racing game, Asphalt 9. I experienced no lags while playing it. For sure, most of your mobile game favorites will run on this phone.

It runs the latest Android 10 with Xiaomi’s heavily-skinned MIUI 12. This version gives you most of the security and performance patches you need for the phone.

Best of all? It has Google Mobile Services (GMS), specifically Google Play for most of your app needs.

The optical in-display fingerprint scanner is fast too. Though it has a face unlock feature, using your fingerprint for biometrics is more secure rather than a 2D image scan that can quickly unlock your phone even when you’re asleep.

Don’t get your hopes up though for an expandable storage as it doesn’t have a microSD card slot.

Battery life that’s light years ahead

This phone lasted longer than the the conversation you’ve had with your ghost đź‘»

The heading might be an exaggeration but this is truly one of its superior features. If you’re the type of user who consumes a lot of media, plays hardcore games, and even scrolls through social media feed or does online shopping for hours, the Mi Note 10 Lite can withstand all of that for a day or so.

Just like its older sibling, it has a 5,260mAh battery paired with an efficient processor, which are both ideal for long-term power and blazingly fast performance — like an ice-cooled comet.

Large battery and turbo charging should be mutually inclusive

Check the label first 🥴

Large battery capacity in future smartphones should be equipped with fast charging technology — just like how the gravitational force between the Earth and the moon are correlated to each other (or how LOONA and Orbits are connected to one another).

Luckily, the Mi Note 10 Lite supports Turbo Charge with a 30W USB-C charger right out of the box. True to its words, it was able to fill up the phone from zero to 100 percent in just a little over an hour. That’s fast considering its gigantic battery.

If you’re into wireless charging, it doesn’t support that by any means.

Audio jack is still in orbit

I miss the pleasure of plugging

Unlike most of today’s gizmos, Xiaomi still decided to keep the 3.5mm headphone jack in the Mi Note 10 Lite. Although I personally don’t use wired earphones anymore as I’ve transitioned into a more wireless lifestyle, it’s still surprising to see a rounded port in 2020 smartphones.

Day6’s Zombie is my current anthem. The lyrics best describe my life right now.

Although it may not have the Quad DAC support from the LG V60 ThinQ, I was still able to enjoy the sound delivered by my old pair of earphones with its extra heavy bass.

This reminds me of my college years where I used to listen to music even with the hassle of tangled wires. A lot of audiophiles will surely love this smartphone.

Odd placement for speaker grilles

Going Nonstop (for Arin)

Just like Uranus’ weird axis, the Mi Note 10 Lite has a weird speaker placement. As I tried playing some music videos, I noticed that my hands cover and muffle the speaker grilles. It’s unfortunate that this phone only has one speaker (I mean having two speakers is TWICE the fun, right?).

It’s hard to avoid blocking the speaker grilles especially when you hold your phone like this while trying to consume media in loudspeaker.

When I hold a phone in the usual portrait orientation, I use my pinky as support. If you do the same thing, you’re gonna block the left speaker placement, too. This may not be a big deal for left-handed or ambidextrous people, though.

Telescope-like camera quality

Don’t be silly! I’m not talking about the Hubble Space Telescope. It’s more like the generic telescope. It’s not that bad as it still gets the job done of seeing objects from afar. But still, it’s not the best viewing experience either, considering you bought a telescope with less fancy glass elements within.

Ultra-wide | Wide | Telephoto

As stated earlier, it packs a 64MP f/1.9 main camera. Other than that, you’ll get an additional 8MP f/2.2 ultra-wide lens with a 120-degree Field of View (FoV). Moreover, there’s a 5MP depth sensor and 2MP macro sensor, both in f/2.4 aperture.

Three of those lenses are downgrades from Mi Note 10’s setup: 108MP f/1.7 main, 20MP f/2.2 ultra-wide, and 8MP f/2.0 telephoto with 7x optical zoom. The Mi Note 10 Lite can only zoom up to 2x.

It doesn’t have a telephoto lens but zoom is still clear

Wide | Telephoto

For most part, HDR and AI produce quality photos

…but large megapixel count doesn’t mean better photos

Although the Galaxy S20+ and Mi Note 10 Lite aren’t totally similar in terms of price range and hardware, I still tried to test how both of their 64-megapixel sensors perform.

Galaxy S20+ (64MP) vs Xiaomi Mi Note 10 Lite (64MP)

Unlike Galaxy S20+’s processing technique, the Mi Note 10 Lite failed to lessen the image’s highlights in favor of a “better” dynamic range that shows lighter shadows on most dimmed objects in the photo.

Don’t be fooled! These samples obviously show that better image quality isn’t based on how large the megapixel count of a phone is. If you’re really into photography, you should know that sensor sizes matter, as well as aperture, the phone post-process techniques, so on and so forth.

Galaxy S20+ (low light) vs Xiaomi Mi Note 10 Lite (low light)

Mi Note 10 Lite’s sample might look fine from afar but if you closely look at the details, it failed to deliver sharper details and whiter highlights. Even shadows in low light weren’t exempted in its image processing. To make it worse, the main camera lacks optical image stabilization (OIS) which resulted in a blurry, shaky output.

Vlog mode might be handy for some of you

This only works on rear camera, though

I’m not totally a fan of vlogging but the Mi Note 10 Lite has a special camera feature called “Vlog mode” which lets you shoot videos with eight vlog templates. This can save you time and hassle from stylizing your vlog from scratch. Although there’s no sample video, I tried testing it on my sleeping cat and it worked wonders!

Selfies are just right

Beauty Mode (Off) vs Beauty Mode (On + AI)

Not a selfie fanatic either but I think selfie camera quality is preferential. I just find it odd that it still smeared some parts of my face even when Beauty Mode is completely turned off.

This feature might work for aspiring “Instagram stars” and “influencers” though. But who knows? That feature might totally entice the person you like the most.

Is the Mi Note 10 Lite your GadgetMatch?

You can get the 6GB/64GB variant at just PhP 16,990 (US$ 340). Meanwhile, there’s another 128GB/8GB option priced at PhP 18,990 (US$ 380).

By the time you reach this line, you’ve probably passed through the phone’s pros and cons. To simply put it, this is a phone meant for power users who don’t demand a flagship-grade processor and heaps of RAM.

Having the right amount of punch paired with long-lasting battery that can last you more than a day are already enough for most consumers out there.

If you’re looking for an out-of-this-world camera performance in a midrange smartphone, this isn’t your best option. Unlike the previous Xiaomi devices I’ve reviewed, I can immediately tell this lacked the outstanding camera performance that those two midrange phones possessed.

Don’t be too disappointed, it can still be a great camera companion if you’re into vlogging, selfies, or maybe for someone who’s just not into the nitty-gritty of manual photography. The camera is ideal for those who mostly rely on Auto Mode and just need to upload photos and videos on their social media accounts.

But if we’re talking about the price tag, it’s definitely a bang for your buck even if it doesn’t have the excellent camera setup of the Mi Note 10. After all, you can’t have it all (just like the person you desperately like).

Accessories

Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro Review: Better than AirPods Pro?

Finally, real Active Noise Cancellation out of the box

Published

on

Samsung has unveiled the newest Galaxy Buds Pro alongside the announcement of the latest Galaxy S21 series.

Other than the new design, better sound quality, and surround sound setup, there’s now a real and intelligent Active Noise Cancellation.

But do these earbuds live up to its ‘Pro’ branding? Watch our Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro review by clicking the video link right here.

Continue Reading

Reviews

Huawei Mate 40 Pro review: Hardware excellence

Held back only by political challenges

Published

on

If there’s one smartphone that Huawei’s best known for, it’s the photography-centric P Series line. It’s the phone that ushered in Huawei’s popularity and its one-time dominance of the smartphone space. But every second half of the year, the company is known to release a second smartphone — The Mate Series. In this instance, the Mate 40 series with the Mate 40, Mate 40 Pro, and Mate 40 Pro+.

The Mate 40 series is an update that brings along with it the industry’s leading features. Like in 2016 — when super-fast charging started to become a trend; or in 2017 — when we first heard about AI on mobile; and 2018 — the first time reverse wireless charging was seen on a phone.

Today we’re looking at the Huawei Mate 40 Pro. What new features does it bring?  Is it still the Android phone to beat?

Space Ring Design

The Mate 40 Pro’s design is pretty, attention-grabbing mainly because of this large circular camera bump. It’s reminiscent of a click-wheel iPod.

Huawei says it’s an evolution of the Halo Ring found on last year’s Mate 30. Called the Space Ring — it’s supposedly inspired by this first-ever photo of a black hole, reflecting Huawei’s spirit of exploration.

We prefer last year’s design. This one is a bit in your face. Although that’s probably because of the stark contrast with our Mystic Silver model.

The ceramic all-black model looks better in my opinion. Depending on your region there will also be Vegan Leather options available in Yellow and Green. And ceramic white.

Huawei is proud of this colorway though. It’s very similar to the Breathing Crystal P30 Pro — so much so that it changes color depending on where the light hits. Sometimes pink and yellow. Sometimes blue and purple. The finish though is matte instead of glossy.

It’s 6.76-inch OLED display is bigger than the Mate 30 Pro.  And as a result, the phone is too. It’s a much bigger phone than we expected. Not quite as big as the Note 20 Ultra but with a bit more heft to it.

Unique to this phone is a display that curves outward more than most phones, making it look like it has no borders on either side.

Instead of notch it’s got a punch hole for a selfie camera and a 3D sensor used for more secure Face Unlock. There’s also an under-display fingerprint scanner. Giving you two options to unlock your device. But do note that 3D Face Unlock is not as safe. For example it will work with a mask on.

It’s got the same red power button on its right hand side. And this year, Huawei brought back the volume rocker which it took away last year in favor of touch based virtual keys that let you tap on either side of the phone to bring up the volume slider. And swipe up and down on the frame to set control. This feature is still present on the Mate 40 Pro.

Stereo Speakers

We’ve seen it occasionally on other phones before, like the Mi 10 Pro from earlier this year. It’s really nice to see Huawei add stereo speakers on both sides to the Mate 40 Pro. Literally, there are speaker grilles on both its top and bottom.

Having audio come from both sides while watching a movie or playing a game makes the audio feel more immersive than just a bottom firing one. I can confirm that these are some of the loudest phone speakers I’ve tested recently. Not quite as loud as the LG V60. Huawei claims these speakers have stronger bass. But we didn’t notice it that much.

A leap in performance

The Mate 40 Pro is  the first Huawei smartphone — and possibly one of the last — to be powered by their new Kirin 9000 processor.  It’s a 5nm chip with an integrated 5G modem. Huawei says it has 15.3B transistors on it. 30% than the other 5nm chip Apple’s A14 Bionic.

Performance + Power Efficiency + Connectivity Vs  Snapdragon 865+ is as follows:  CPU 10% / 52% Faster  / NPU 2.4x Faster

Of course with any new chip there are bold statements about how much more powerful its CPU, GPU, NPU, and ISP are. And how much more battery efficient too. So no surprise that games run smoothly.

The phone’s got a 90Hz Display with a close to 4K panel. Huawei says this was intentional to deliver the best balance between battery life and performance. You can choose to have it dynamically switch between the two; or Ultra — having it on all the time.

Cinecamera

The Mate 40 Pro has a triple camera setup:

  • 50 MP, f/1.9, 23mm (wide), 1/1.28
  • 12 MP, f/3.4, 125mm (periscope telephoto), PDAF, OIS, 5x optical zoom
  • 20 MP, f/1.8, 18mm (ultrawide), PDAF
  • TOF 3D, (depth)

Let’s take a look at some samples. First its Main Wide Angle Camera.

No surprises here. Sunny day shots look great. No overblown highlights. Lots of details. Even the clouds are not mushy.

Of course, I love some creamy bokeh. And between its large sensor and fast f/1.9 lens you don’t need portrait mode for shots like this.

Speaking of portrait mode here’s one shot during the day and one at night. Both look great!

To gauge low light performance take a look at this colorful wall in between two buildings. The shot on the left was taken during the day. The shot on the right was taken at night without night mode.

Night Mode works with the Ultra Wide Angle lens ≠ I used it in this shot of the Brooklyn Academy of Music building.

But TBH it didn’t really need Night Mode. Here’s the same photo with night mode turned off.

Finally let’s take a look at the telephoto camera. I’m glad Huawei has scaled back on its efforts to zoom closer to 100X.

It’s 5X optical telephoto lens is sufficient.

As you can see in these 1x, 10x and 50x photos of the One Hanson Building in Downtown Brooklyn, you’ll find the 10X is still very good. While 50X is passable, but not something you’d post unless the subject was rare.

Two years ago the Mate blew its competitors out of the water with its ability to basically see in the dark. It’s interesting how competition has since caught up. The last few days here in New York have been rainy and gloomy so I have not been able to go out and test shoot some video.

Huawei says its Ultra Wide Cine Camera with its 3:2 ratio and XD Fusion HDR technology that lets you capture backlit video is a big improvement.

Finally the Mate 40 Pro has a 13MP ultra wide-angle selfie camera. With anti-distortion technology and Intelligent FOV finder which will detect if multiple people are in the shot and will adjust framing accordingly.

Whether they’re true to life or not, we love selfies taken on Huawei Phones.

When you first use portrait mode, you’ll be given the option to turn beauty mode on or off by default.  Here are some sample shots.

Battery & Charging

The Huawei Mate 40 Pro packs a 4400 mAh battery. In my few days reviewing the phone, it lasted me about a day and a half with average use. It also ships with a 66W charger out of the box. A very generous inclusion and possibly the fastest that comes bundled with a smartphone.

In my tests, I got to 33% in 10 minutes. 81% in 30.  A full charge from 0 took 55 minutes. The phone also supports Huawei’s optional 50W Wireless Charger.

Using this accessory. I got close to similar results: 26% in 10 minutes. 72% in 30. And a full charge in just a minute shy of an hour. (59 minutes)

As a point of comparison, Samsung’s Galaxy Note 20 Ultra comes with a 4500 mAh battery. And ships with a 25W Charger.

Got to 58% in 30 minutes. And 100% in 70.

The Note 20 Ultra only charges up to 15W wirelessly. With Samsung’s Wireless Charger. You can get to 22% in 30 minutes. And 100% in the double-time it takes to wireless charge the Mate 40 Pro. (120 minutes / 2 hours)

Emui 11 on a Mate

The Mate 40 Pro runs EMUI 11 based on Android 10. As EMUI 11 just rolled out, and given Huawei’s current relationship with Google this comes as no surprise.

One of my favorite software features the Mate 40 Pro is called Eyes on Display an improvement to the Always On Display feature on its phones. You know, when phone displays don’t dim all the way but show you the time, or date or a cool graphic.

To save on battery life Eyes on Display will dim the screen all the way. But will know when you’re looking at the phone. You don’t even need to move your head. Just move your eyes and look at the phone. And the Always On Display will turn on. It’s pretty cool I’ve gotta admit. Supposedly, this saves battery life as well.

Other cool features include smart gestures. New to the Mate 40 Series is being able to wave left and right to turn pages on an e-book or flip through photos in your gallery. Hands-free. But my favorite is the grab gesture to take a screenshot.

Is the Mate 40 Pro your GadgetMatch?

We hate that we’re in a situation where one of the world’s best smartphone manufacturers cannot compete on equal footing with the world’s best.

Huawei is doing its best to survive this political crisis, investing millions of dollars into its own App Ecosystem, it’s own operating System, and it’s own services like Petal Search and the upcoming Petal Maps.

But as it stands — one can’t overlook the lack of Google Play Services and how that affects the experience for everyday Android users.

And then there’s the fact that because of US restrictions — Huawei’s Chip Making Arm — responsible for the Kirin Processor might no longer be able to source the components it needs. Some fear Kirin 9000 might be its last hurrah.

There’s an uphill climb ahead. And hopefully there’s light at the end of the tunnel.

All these challenges aside, in a world where the lack of GMS wasn’t an issue. This is what we would have said about the Mate 40 Pro:

  • It’s a solidly-built, well designed smartphone.
  • We’re fans of the vegan leather options.
  • It’s an excellent flagship that balances performance, features and battery efficiency.
  • Its cameras are still excellent, but competition has finally caught up.
  • We think it’s fast wired and wireless charging features are game changing. And that in a world where more and more accessories are being left out of the box, it’s refreshing to get a 66W charger bundled.
  • And we think that its current price tiers starting at EUR 899/ PhP 55,999 is competitive vs the likes of Samsung and Apple.

In a perfect world, this phone would definitely be up there among the phones that we could wholeheartedly recommend. Here’s to hoping political challenges resolve themselves soon.

We are fans of Huawei phones no more than we are fans of Samsung Galaxies and Apple iPhones. But our stake in all of this is competition. Because that means more choice and better technology for us all.

The Huawei Mate 40 Pro retails for EUR 1199/PhP 55,999.

Continue Reading

Gaming

Cyberpunk 2077 PC review: Looks can be deceiving

It lived up to the hype, then undid some of it

Published

on

Cyberpunk 2077

Last December 10, 2020, CD Projekt Red (CDPR) finally dropped its much awaited video game title for the past seven years. Set in the year 2077, this new open-world experience explores the possibilities of human existence with science at its core. Beneath all the scientific breakthroughs, an everlasting human conflict resides.

In my opinion, this is how the world of Cyberpunk 2077 seemingly positions itself as a video game. It prides itself as a sprawling open world, with a character-driven story of your own choosing. With a great deal of combat opportunities and side missions inherent to open world games, it shaped up according to the hype.

And then, I felt it’s hype go through a cycle of life and death as a game that’s just, well, good.

A promising start with every single new game

At the onset of starting a new save file, you’re given three life paths to choose from. For the majority of my playthrough, I simply went with the Street Kid since I felt it had the most to mess around with. If you’re up to it, you can also choose between the Nomad or Corpo life path, each with their own sets of storylines to unfold.

After you configure every physical aspect — yes, including the private parts — of your character named “V”, the game throws you into the action outright. It’s the usual get-a-feel-for-the-controls type of thing, which is par for the course if you ask me. From movement to combat styles, the game does its best at orienting you with how it works.

The game then proceeds to give you a rough six-hour prelude detailing events of V’s first mission with Jackie Welles. I say a rough six hours because the game already gives you a glimpse of just how open the world is to explore. You’re also introduced to a few side missions that ultimately influence the rest of your playthrough. Honestly, it’s a great start leading up to Act 1.

You shape the story, but you also don’t feel it?

After the prelude, you basically proceed however you like, which I felt wasn’t necessarily a bold thing that CDPR implemented. However, it complements the grander scheme of the open-world adventure through Night City. At this point, I thought that this would allow me to pour myself out into the lore.

But after nearly 45+ hours of gameplay, I just didn’t feel the story bringing me into its world. See, regardless of the life path you took, V goes on a quest to free himself of the engram of one Johnny Silverhand. After stealing Arasaka’s prized relic and injecting it into his brain, the character voiced by Keanu Reeves is basically seizing control of V.

For the most part, you are given choices in both dialogue and actions to help you steer the story. Much like other choice-driven storylines like in Until Dawn, there are so many ways the main story could end. Personally, I felt that the main culprit for this is the fact that side missions are integrated well into the main story at some points.

In essence, there’s no one clear way to end Cyberpunk 2077, and I just can’t seem to find myself drawn into that.

Combat and movement mechanics I can get behind

Now, I can wholeheartedly say that this game truly shines mostly due to how the gameplay mechanics worked out. This game took a whole page out of Grand Theft Auto, but added much greater incentives to keep you exploring all sorts of gameplay styles. I truly felt that the gameplay feels intricate, yet unique towards several situations.

Combat and stealth are the main attractions when you go around all of Night City. For the most part, this game gives you a ton of ways to practice combat and stealth through the side missions, which is pretty good.

Gunplay relies a little bit on crosshair placement, which you mostly see on competitive shooters. So, just be aware of where you’re aiming your gun.

Cyberpunk 2077

Moving around the overworld feels natural, along with driving around in the vehicle of your choice. Although, if I had one gripe with this game, it’s the physics for some of your actions and vehicles. For instance, how come you’re still standing when you jump out of a moving car? Or, how come some motorcycles are a literal chore to turn while driving? Sometimes, I like some realism in my open-world, futuristic games.

Incredible amounts of bodyhacking

Other key features in this game are a much more intricate skill tree and Cyberware enhancements. As a half-human, half-cyborg, you have access to a series of skills depending on which aspect of your character you want to focus on. Most skills you earn are combat and stealth based, and how often you use them increases its efficacy.

Personally, I admire this level of intricacy with CDPR’s approach to a character skill tree. Depending on how you want to progress through the story, there are a ton of ways you can go about upgrading certain skills. Also, this game offers unique dialogue options depending on how high your skill level is.

Cyberpunk 2077

When it comes to what I call the “bodyhacking” section, it’s also extensive. Basically, you can attach a bunch of cyberware mods to certain parts of your body to increase certain attributes. You can even apply it to your weapons and clothes, and it greatly complements the combat in certain situations. It’s honestly a lot to take in, but it doesn’t overwhelm you.

Visual spectacle? Not entirely, I suppose

As of the time I’m writing this, the game had six rounds of patches to address a ton of issues. In such a short amount of time, CDPR managed to make the PC version look a little better than how it was on launch day. However, it still doesn’t excuse the developers from those issues because, well, this game was well-hyped.

Now, I’ll admit that the visuals of this game are pretty impressive. Even when I turned a ton of graphical settings down because of my hardware, it still looks aesthetically pleasing. Honestly, I appreciate the colors and the textures a bit more during the night time segments of the game. Is that why they called the main location Night City?

But, it isn’t consistently great the longer, and the farther you get into the story. I had some gameplay plagued by textures loading later than usual, and items that just don’t show up. For instance, during combat, my weapons don’t show up when I try to draw them out — which somehow does not allow me to use them. Last-gen console players had it way worse, but at least for the PC, the visuals were great at times.

Was this really all worth seven years of waiting?

Cyberpunk 2077 had a promising start after seven years of being in total limbo. It presents itself as an open-world experience, centered around a technologically-advanced universe still plagued by human existence. With manageable combat and stealth mechanics, different life paths to explore, and an abundance of customization options, it sets you up quite nicely.

Cyberpunk 2077

But when you play this game long enough, and through six rounds of patches to fix several bugs and visual errors, it makes you think if it was truly worth the wait. Honestly, the story doesn’t draw you in, I felt I couldn’t fully resonate with any of the characters, and the aforementioned bugs slightly ruined the experience.

This isn’t the near-perfect game everyone was hyping it up to be, especially given the seven year wait. However, it’s still great for what it offers if you had planned to get this for the PC anyway.

Continue Reading

Trending