Cameras

3 reasons why you don’t need an expensive action camera

Especially if you’re not a professional

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Every guy out there wants to have an expensive action camera. It’s like a status symbol for adventurers and travelers alike.

Yes, action cameras are a great addition to your gear when traveling, but it’s not essential — not unless you’re into epic and picture-worthy adventures.

If you’re a traveler — like me — who’s fond of doing physical activities like hiking, surfing, trail running, and riding ATVs, let me tell you frankly: You don’t need an expensive action camera. Here are some reasons why.

1. You’ll need mounts and other accessories

If you think an action camera is the only thing you need for your adventures, you’re wrong, kiddo. Accessories are just as important as your camera. How are you going to capture that epic ATV ride without a mount on your helmet or chest?

Most action cameras don’t bundle mounts and other accessories in the package, so your purchase can potentially become even more expensive.

2. You’re not a content creator

Okay, let’s face the truth: You’re not a content creator in need of high-end equipment. Even worse: You’re bound to break or lose your camera while practicing more daring shoots. Yes, they’re marketed as unbreakable, but accidents happen in most outdoor situations.

I recently went on a hike during a rainy month, and while the weather was unpredictable and the slopes proved to be dangerous, I managed to take videos during the times I felt it was safe to record. Times like these are what make me appreciate having a camera that doesn’t cost a fortune, because at the end of the day, I’d drop these gadgets to make sure I survive during accidents.

If you want to capture your adventures and share them to the world, you’re better off with a more affordable action camera. Be practical!

3. You’re not always on an adventure

We buy action cameras because we want to capture moments that our smartphones or point-and-shoot cameras can’t take. However, if you seldom go outdoors and participate in daring activities, you don’t need to shell out US$ 400 worth of equipment.

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The rise of action cameras means we have a lot of options to choose from for all kinds of budgets. Being as practical and money-savvy as I am, I’ll always choose a gadget that has excellent value for money. One that I enjoy is the Apeman Action Camera A80, which is a solid budget offering.

The Apeman Action Camera A80

This action camera shoots 4K at 25fps, 2K at 30fps, or 1080p at 60fps. It also shoots 20-megapixel photos and smooth videos at a wide angle of 170 degrees.

The A80 has a built-in 2-inch HD LCD (which I didn’t bother using) and comes with built-in Wi-Fi so you can view, share, and edit your footage once you connect the camera through the CamKing app on your smartphone.

It also comes with a case to protect your camera from scratches, dents, and dust. It’s waterproof and can be submerged up to 30 meters deep, perfect for water sports like swimming and surfing.

Other features include time-lapse recording, loop recording, and support for 64GB microSD cards. Best of all, this action camera also comes in a bundled kit of mounts and accessories, with two rechargeable 1050mAh batteries that can record up to 120 minutes.

Apeman’s Action Camera A80 is pretty convincing and offers excellent value for its price of US$ 69 with mounts and accessories.

What’s the best action camera for you?

Of course, we’ll always opt for higher-end cameras because we want the best photos and videos to show off, but if you think having an expensive action camera guarantees stunning output, well, you’re wrong again, kiddo. It’s always the person behind the camera creating the magic.

Honestly, an expensive camera isn’t worth the money if it’s left to accumulate dust while there’s no action in your life. Sometimes, we want the best of the best, but all we need is what’s practical to capture all our experiences, whenever those may be.

Cameras

Fujifilm X-T30 is a lightweight 4K mirrorless camera

Cheaper version of the X-T3

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Image credit: Fujifilm

After Canon‘s announcement of the new EOS RP, it’s now Fujifilm‘s turn to present their latest offering: the X-T30. Fuji’s new mirrorless interchangeable camera is the successor to 2017’s X-T20.

The X-T30 is positioned to be a cheaper variant of the flagship X-T3 camera, but they actually share many common features and specs. It’s got a compact and lightweight body at just 383g which looks similar to the premium model, but with some minor changes at the back. It’s got a focus joystick instead of a d-pad, but retains the touchscreen.

Speaking of, it’s a 2-way tilting LCD panel with 1.04 million dots. The EVF, on the other hand, is a 2.36-million-dot OLED color viewfinder with a near 100 percent coverage area.

Image credit: Fujifilm

Inside the camera is a 26.1-megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS sensor with an ISO range of 160 to 12800, which is expandable up to 51200, and backed by an X-Processor 4. With this, the X-T30 can shoot 30fps at 1.25x crop and 20fps without a crop using the electronic shutter. If you wish to use the mechanical shutter, the speed will be reduced to 8fps.

It has a hybrid AF system with 100 percent phase-detect AF, face detection, and eye tracking. Autofocus is also improved even in low-light. Focusing can be selected either through the touchscreen or joystick.

When it comes to video, the camera can shoot 4K at 30fps and up to 120fps when downscaled to 1080p. It’s capable of 10-bit recording and 4:2:2 DCI 4K video through the HDMI port. Fujifilm’s Film Simulation modes are also available.

The Fujifilm X-T30 will be available in March starting at US$ 899 for the body only. It’ll go up to US$ 999 when bundled with an XC 15-45mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS lens, or US$ 1,299 when bundled with an 18-55mm f/2.8-4 lens.

SEE ALSO: Fujifilm Instax SQ20 hands-on: How good is it?

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Cameras

Canon EOS RP is company’s cheaper and smaller full-frame mirrorless camera

The second model in the series

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Image credit: Canon

After the first EOS R last year, Canon has a new full-frame mirrorless camera — the EOS RP. It’s positioned below the EOS R, yet it happens to be Canon’s smallest full-frame camera. It’s also cheaper, which means it’s aimed for the mass market.

For starters, the EOS RP has a 26.2-megapixel full-frame sensor, only a slight step down from the 30.3-megapixel sensor of the EOS R. It still features the same ISO range of 100 to 25600, DIGIC 8 image processor, and Dual Pixel CMOS AF. Of course, the camera uses the new RF-mount system.

To make the EOS RP cheaper and smaller, Canon had to cut down some features like the continuous shooting speed to 5fps (from 8fps of the EOS R) and 4,779 autofocus points (EOS R has 5,655).

Image credit: Canon

Both the 0.39-inch OLED EVF and 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen LCD have fewer pixels at 2.36 and 1.04 million dots, respectively.

The EOS RP can only shoot 4K at 25fps with 120Mb/s bitrate and 8-bit color depth. It also doesn’t support Canon Log for professional color grading. It only has one SD card slot as well, so you’ll need high capacity memory cards when shooting non-stop.

Image credit: Canon

Size-wise, this is where the EOS RP shines. It measures 132.5 x 85 x 70mm and weighs 485g with a battery and card already. This makes the EOS RP significantly smaller than the EOS R and even entry-level Canon DSLR cameras.

Other features of the EOS RP include focus peaking, 8.3-megapixel still photo capture when recording in 4K, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity, stereo microphones, water and dust resistance, 250-shot battery life, and USB-C charging.

Despite some of the shortcomings of the EOS RP, its price is a pretty sweet deal. It’ll be available by the end of the month starting at US$ 1,299 for the body-only package, but it’ll come with an EG-E1 extension grip and an EF-mount adapter in the box. It’ll also come bundled with a 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens for US$ 1,699 or with a 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens for US$ 2,199.

SEE ALSO: Canon unveils EOS R, its first full-frame mirrorless camera

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Cameras

Fujifilm Instax SQ20 hands-on: How good is it?

Trying out the new Motion Mode on doggies!

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Fujifilm’s sequel to their first ever digital/analog hybrid is here and it’s looking better than ever. The Instax SQ20 is one classy-looking instant camera but what can it do? With a set of built-in filters and new features like the Motion Mode, it looks like a promising device.

I finally try it out, with help from some doggies, on our hands-on video.

The SQ20 retails for US$ 199 in the US, PhP 12,999 in the Philippines, and SG$ 299 in Singapore.

In case you’re having trouble viewing, watch HERE.

READ ALSO: Fujifilm Instax SQ10 review

READ ALSO: Prynt Pocket unboxing and review: A printer that prints videos?

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