News

Cybersecurity report reveals millions of Android devices affected by exploits

Affected phones include ASUS, Essential, LG, and ZTE

Published

on

Despite cybersecurity efforts, smartphones are still one of the most vulnerable devices you can ever own. Besides viruses, our handy phones constantly go through bugs and backdoors. Among all of the phones available today, no variant suffers more than Android devices.

According to cybersecurity firm Kryptowire, millions of Android phones might have already shipped with dangerous vulnerabilities. In the recent Black Hat security conference, the firm revealed that ten popular phones come with exploits out of the box.

Unfortunately, the report did not reveal all of the devices affected by the issue. In fact, the firm promises to uncover more exploits and affected devices in the future. Meanwhile, the concealment aims to give the devices’ companies a chance to respond. Thankfully, the report names five devices to use as examples.

These examples originate from one main source — unauthorized app installs. Because the conventional Google Play Store is usually a safe haven, these attacks rely on outside sources like APKs. Unlike installs from the former, malicious APK installs can bypass permissions to illegally access the phone’s data.

Despite sharing the same source, the results can vary greatly due to the device. Accordingly, the report names five devices from four companies — ASUS, Essential, LG, and ZTE — as examples.

For the most part, these exploits affect and obtain data from the phone. For example, attacks on the ZTE Blade Spark and Blade Vantage allows hackers to access sensitive data and personal information. On the other hand, attacks on the LG G6 and the Essential Phone can enable hackers to lock users out of their devices and reset the phone manually.

Sadly, the extent of the attacks spread far beyond illegal data access. Attacks on the popular ASUS ZenFone V Live completely surrenders the device to the whims of an attacker. This means that hackers can invariably control the phone as if it were their own.

To respond, all four affected companies have stated that they are working on patches to the devices. Unfortunately, Android’s open-source nature hinders the quick distribution of patches. Patch developers must adapt to both the device’s and the telco’s custom code.

Sadly, this means that the exploits still exist in one form or another. Currently, the only reliable course of action is to remain vigilant with security updates and patches.

SEE ALSO: US temporarily lifts ZTE sanctions for security updates, bans China Mobile

News

Apple is getting sued for false advertising

They lied about screen size and resolution

Published

on

Everyone hates false advertising. If a company sells a product, you expect to get exactly what you paid for. Unfortunately, hyperbolic marketing is a thing. Often, companies will oversell their products to maximize sales. Of course, most people don’t mind. If a product works well, advertising doesn’t matter.

Regardless, there will always be a subset of the population that won’t stand for false advertising. Some are even litigious. In America, two people have sued Apple for just that.

In California and New York, two plaintiffs have filed suits against the company for false advertising. According to the extensive law document, Apple lied about their display size and screen quality.

Based on official spec sheets and advertising, the iPhone X and XS have a resolution of 2436 x 1125. The iPhone XS Max has a resolution of 2688 x 1242. However, Christian Sponchiado and Courtney Davis — the plaintiffs — argue that this doesn’t factor in the notch and the rounded corners.

Mathematically, the suit proves that Apple’s advertising is false. For example: instead of the advertised 2436 x 1125 resolution, the iPhone X and XS only have a possible resolution of about 2195 x 1125, a 10 percent discrepancy.

Additionally, the suit attacks Apple’s “it’s all screen” advertising. On launch, the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR used wallpapers that obscured the notch. According to the suit, Apple intentionally hid the pixels for the “all screen” tagline.

The suit was filed in all 50 US states and the nation’s capital. It tries to appeal to the country’s trade laws. In the suit, both parties bought the latest phones and “suffered injury in fact and lost money because the [iPhones] did not provide the advertised screen quality, resolution, or size and was worth less than the phone he had bargained for.”

Among all of Apple’s various legal battles, this fight is one of the stranger ones to date.

SEE ALSO: Apple will not change its design next year, report says

Continue Reading

News

Honor smartwatch with MediaTek chip may be coming

Even longer battery life?

Published

on

Huawei Watch GT | GadgetMatch

It’s no secret that MediaTek chipsets are found in a ton of products, from smartphones to smart speakers and even wireless earphones. Now, it’s possible we’re gonna see a new one powering a smartwatch, as well.

I’m referring to the next Honor smartwatch, which has leaked through a Bluetooth SIG certification. It may be the successor or lower-end model of the recently launched Honor Watch.

Not much is mentioned on the document other than it’ll have Bluetooth connectivity and a MediaTek chipset. The latter one is more interesting, since we normally find Qualcomm chips inside wearables.

Like with the Huawei Watch GT, recent smartwatch developments have focused more on battery life than operating system or features. Chances are we might see the same level of attention placed on the upcoming Honor smartwatch.

No launch date or other details have been revealed yet. The Honor Watch is the company’s first true smartwatch and MediaTek does have experience with wearables, so it’ll be interesting to see where they’ll go with this partnership.

Via: GSMArena

Continue Reading

News

Here’s why the Samsung Galaxy Flex will cost so much

Hint: it has something to do with the screen

Published

on

Based on the current rumors, next year’s foldable phones will take the mantle as history’s most expensive smartphones. Currently, Samsung’s upcoming Galaxy Flex is already slated to come with price tags above the US$ 2,000 mark. Even without rumors, the revolutionary form factor will easily break banks because of the new screen alone.

Of course, as with all major purchases, we want to know why we’re paying so much. Finally, we have an insider’s look into what’s ticking inside these foldable screens. Via LetsGoDigitalKorean firm CGS-CIMB Research has broken down the list of materials needed to make the Galaxy Flex. For reference, the report also compares the Galaxy Flex’s breakdown with the iPhone XS Max’s and the Galaxy S9+’s.

According to the report, the Galaxy Flex almost completely uses more expensive components than today’s smartphones.

Naturally, the phone’s foldable display takes the cake. The foldable display costs US$ 218.80 per screen. The amount is almost double the price of the iPhone XS Max’s display. It’s also almost thrice the price of the Galaxy S9+’s display.

Image source: CGS-CIMB Research

As for the rest, the Galaxy Flex’s components are a few more dollars more expensive than its comparisons. The comparison only falters in power management. The iPhone XS Max spent almost two dollars more on power management than the Galaxy Flex.

All in all, the Galaxy Flex costs US$ 636.70. This is a huge leap from contemporary flagships. (The iPhone XS Max costs US$ 390.00; the Galaxy S9+ costs US$ 375.80.)

Because of this massive price increase, Samsung can charge more than today’s flat phones. The report estimates a US$ 1,800 SRP. Arguably, a huge chunk of this price will come from the extensive research done to manufacture the product. Regardless, the bank-breaking price tag is still worlds apart from today’s most expensive smartphones.

According to the report, this awful trend will likely continue. In 2022, the industry is expected to ship 24 million foldable phones, compared to next year’s paltry 3.5 million units. Despite the rush in supply, the price will still stay the same, averaging around US$ 1,300 per unit.

SEE ALSO: Samsung Galaxy A8s debuts with Infinity-O display

Continue Reading

Trending