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Final Fantasy VII iOS First Look and Gameplay

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Final Fantasy VII comes to the iPhone and iPad. Fresh from the iTunes app store, we bring you this first look and game play video.

Don’t expect any fancy graphics folks, this is what gaming looked like in 1997. The iOS version of the FF7 allows you to max out stats and turn random encounters off so you can focus on helping Cloud Strife, Tifa Lockhart, and Vincent Valentine take on Sephiroth. Otherwise it’s exactly the same as the original, and should tide you over till the highly anticipated remake drops. Download here: http://apple.co/1Mygnwa Game costs $19.99

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IGTV will soon have ads and share revenue with creators

Can it take on YouTube?

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There’s some good news as well as bad news. How you perceive it, depends on your role. If you’re a content creator on IGTV, Instagram will share ad revenues with you. And, if you’re an IGTV viewer, the bad news is you’ll have to watch that ad, just like YouTube.

Facebook-owned Instagram has announced it’ll start serving IGTV with ads and share the revenue with influencers who create content for the platform. Instagram already has ads embedded while scrolling posts or sifting through stories. We expected the roll-out to happen in the near future considering Facebook’s reputation with ads and hunger for user data.

Instagram will share at least 55 percent of the revenue from these ads with creators. This should encourage users to upload more content on the platform and the strategy is a proven one today. Google’s YouTube has created a thriving community of YouTubers who’ve become a millionaire thanks to their regular content push and subscriber base.

It’s testing IGTV ads with a handful of U.S. based creators and advertisers and plans to expand that slowly in the coming months. Furthermore, creators can also charge for virtual badges that shall be visible during Instagram Live.

Currently, the most sought monetization method for influencers is to directly cut deals with brands. But this removes Instagram from the equation completely. Instead, it has already rolled out features like Shopping, and Live Shopping to keep the user within the app and complete the transaction.

IGTV was launched in June 2018 as a spinoff of Instagram where users can watch longer videos made for mobile devices. Viewers access IGTV videos directly through Instagram or the stand-alone IGTV app.

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Twitter labels President Trump’s tweet as “misleading”

Even Twitter’s had enough!

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For the first time, Twitter has flagged some of US President Donald Trump’s tweets with a fact-check warning. The social media platform labeled two of his tweets as “unsubstantiated” and accused him of making false claims.

The label was added because it violated Twitter’s “civic integrity policy”, a company spokeswoman confirmed. Below the tweets, a link which read “Get the facts about mail-in ballots” took users to a notice calling the claims “unsubstantiated”, citing reporting by CNN, the Washington Post, and other credible publications.

Obviously, Trump was furious over the label and accused Twitter of stifling free speech. He further accused Twitter of “interfering in the 2020 Presidential Election.” However, it’s worth remembering that Federal law protects the rights of internet platforms to moderate the third-party speech they publish.

Trump and Twitter share a long history and their relationship isn’t constructive. Twitter is technically a micro-blogging platform that’s used by everyone. World leaders have their official accounts on the platform to reach out quickly. But Trump has made Twitter a battleground and threatened to nuke a country, spread misinformation, malign the media, and spread conspiracy theories.

Trump has never previously faced Twitter moderation on his account. The social media platform has radically upped its moderation policies before the 2020 American Presidential Election to ensure the spread of misinformation is controlled and a Cambridge Analytica-type scandal isn’t repeated.

It banned political ads in November 2019 and recently announced that it’ll be labeling tweets that are found spreading misinformation amid the Coronavirus pandemic.

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Spotify is taking out the infamous 10,000-song limit

Finally!

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Amidst the immense variety of music streaming services today, Spotify remains at the top of the pile. Whether due to service quality or brand loyalty, everyone still uses Spotify. However, despite its dominance, the popular service still has a few downsides. For one, Spotify has an infamous 10,000-song limit, preventing users from saving more than 10,000 songs.

Thankfully, Spotify is finally doing away with this limit soon. According to a new community post, a user’s library can add an unlimited amount of songs, affecting both liked songs and liked albums.

Previously, once you hit the 10,000-song limit, Spotify hits you up with a falsely positive warning: “Epic collection, friend. There’s no more room in Your Library. To save more, you’ll need to remove some songs or albums.” Despite an overwhelming clamor to get rid of it, Spotify has persistently refused to eliminate the limit.

However, Spotify’s latest expansion comes with an important caveat. It applies only to “Your Music” collections. Users still have to abide by the 10,000-song limit for custom playlists and offline downloads. Regardless, the minor expansion is a good step forward to completely eradicating the limit across the board.

Of course, only a minuscule fraction of Spotify users will likely bump into this song ceiling. Even for an expansive service like Spotify, 10,000 songs are still a sizable amount for most users. Still, if you ever find yourself on 9,999 songs, you might not need to worry about adding a few more songs anymore. The feature has already started rolling out to new users globally.

SEE ALSO: Spotify offers 3-month trial to new premium customers

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