Camera Shootouts

Huawei P10 vs ASUS ZenFone 3 Zoom: Camera Shootout

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Did you think we’d pit the ZenFone 3 Zoom only against the OnePlus 3T? Think again!

As close as the fight was, we feel ASUS’ best camera phone deserves to be compared to a fellow dual-camera handset in the same price bracket, as well. For this shootout, we’re bringing in Huawei’s flagship P10.

The P10 is best known for its Leica branding which carries over from last year’s P9 and Mate 9. Its dual-lens implementation, however, is quite different from the ZenFone’s. While the ZenFone 3 Zoom uses its second camera module for optical zoom, the P10’s secondary monochrome sensor adds to the imaging data to increase overall quality.

Two different styles, one worthy matchup! Like before, everything is set at Auto settings using the default camera apps and no editing in between. I highly recommend viewing these photos on a monitor to truly see the differences.

Here we have a bright sunny day to compare landscape photos. Both cameras did a fine job rendering the entire scene with balanced details and wide dynamic range. The only difference is the P10’s shot being a little warmer and the ZenFone 3 Zoom’s looking more saturated. This round can go either way.

Similar to the last sample, the P10 prefers the warmer side of the scale while making everything look nice and sharp. The ZenFone 3 Zoom did fine keeping the white balance in check, but sacrificed sharpness for the grass and wall in the process.

This round should definitely go to Huawei’s smartphone. The macro shot of the flowers has beautiful colors and fantastic focus throughout the subject. The ZenFone 3 Zoom, on the other hand, had a difficult time locking on to the moving flowers and maintaining proper exposure.

Although some may prefer the saturated skin tone the ZenFone 3 Zoom produced here, we find the P10 better at injecting more life into the scene and nailing every single detail in both the foreground and background.

In this scenario, the cameras are put to the dynamic range and detail test without the use of HDR mode or added filters. With that, the P10 once again wins with more natural colors and without blowing out the sky like what the ZenFone 3 Zoom unfortunately did.

As great as their dual-cameras are, that doesn’t automatically translate to good front-facing cameras. Both phones outputted acceptable results, but neither really ran away with the win. It’s up to you whether you prefer the more saturated and colorful look of the ZenFone 3 Zoom’s selfie or the subdued, softer self portrait of the P10.

This part is a challenge for any camera phone, but the two competitors did fine by our standards. Because of the unpredictable lighting from the disco ball, the ZenFone 3 Zoom ended up with a reddish layer, while the P10’s photo looks yellowish yet slightly brighter.

The ZenFone 3 Zoom again had a hard time lighting up subjects in a dimly lit environment. We much prefer the P10’s product in this case, having noticeably better exposure distribution and greater sharpness on the clip we focused on to the left.

In yet another challenging situation, the P10 has a slight edge in getting the white balance correctly and making the elements look sharper. We have to appreciate the ZenFone 3 Zoom’s attempt at reducing noise in the darkest regions of the landscape, though.

Now, here’s something evenly matched! We can’t fault either phone for struggling to find light using their tiny selfie cameras, but the results were fine and don’t deserve any complaints. You’ll just notice the P10’s photo looking a tad bit warmer, while the ZenFone 3 Zoom’s shot favors sharpness.

Just like in the disco ball photo earlier, the ZenFone 3 Zoom casts a red hue on darker spots, whereas the P10’s picture looks a lot more yellowish. We have to give the edge to the P10 for reducing the amount of ugly noise in the background, although the ZenFone does a better job handling white balance on the road and crossing.

Rounding up all tests, Huawei’s flagship phone edged out the ZenFone 3 Zoom in most cases. The P10 really outdid itself in producing vivid colors without oversaturating during daytime, and its low-light performance is some of the best we’ve seen out of any smartphone to come out recently. Having two main cameras work together to create one stunning photo nearly every time won us over.

With that, we can’t fault ASUS for wanting to use its additional lens for something other than improving image quality. By having optical zoom, you can capture moments without having to inch closer to the subject, which is incredibly useful when shooting things that are normally too far away or sensitive to minor movements, like a musician on stage or pets, respectively.

What do you think? Let us know in the comments below if you agree or disagree with our assessments.

SEE ALSO: OnePlus 3T vs ASUS ZenFone 3 Zoom: Camera Shootout

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Camera Shootouts

Huawei P40 Pro vs Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra: Camera shootout

Which set of flagship cameras perform to your liking?

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Huawei and Samsung has been in a tussle in recent years over which brand is the number one Android smartphone maker. Buoyed by their outstanding work in mobile imaging, Huawei recently seized the top spot in terms of sales according to Counterpoint Research.

After comparing the two overall, we know take a closer look at how their early 2020 releases  — the Huawei P40 Pro and the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra — fair against each other in a smartphone camera shootout!

Make sure to jot down your answers, as the results of this blind test will be at the end of this article.

As usual, photos were labeled, resized, and collaged (this time) for you to load the images faster. No post-processing nor any color adjustments were done in any of the photos. So, let’s begin!

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Results

#1

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#2

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#3

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#4

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#5

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#6

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#7

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#8

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#9

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#10

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#11

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#12

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#13

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#14

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#15

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#16

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#17

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#18

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#19

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#20

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#21

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#22

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#23

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#24

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#25

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#26

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#27

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#28

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#29

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

#30

Photo A – Huawei P40 Pro

Photo B – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

#31

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P40 Pro

Were you surprised by the results and your choices? One that’s very evident is how the Huawei P40 Pro’s larger sensor produces images with higher brightness and less contrast.

At first glance, it looks like the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra is able to retain more detail on the first few sets of photos in broad daylight. However, if you zoom in, you’ll notice that both phones capture and retain nearly the same level of detail.

In fact, in some of the wider shots taken with both smartphones’ main sensors, you could argue that the P40 Pro is able to gather more detail. The Galaxy S20 Ultra also applies a more aggressive post-processing, whereas with the P40 Pro, what you see on the screen viewfinder is most likely what you’ll get on the photo.

Wides and zooms

Interesting, when it comes to the main sensors, the P40 Pro has the wider field of view, but switching over to the ultra-wide angle lens, the Galaxy S20 Ultra captures more of the scene.

Detail retention is once again pretty even. Color reproduction is a mixed bag for the P40 Pro. Most of the images are color accurate, but every so often you’ll get a shot with post-processing as aggressive as the Galaxy S20 Ultra.

The latter consistently produces high contrast images — par for the course for Samsung — and one that most people might find more “ready for the ‘gram.” But if you’re after brighter, more color accurate shots that you can tweak on your favorite mobile photo editing apps, the P40 Pro is the way to go.

The same is mostly true for all of the zoom shots, but the P40 Pro gets a significant edge in detail retention.

Selfies and portraits

This one’s pretty close but one of main key differences are once again the wide angle view. The P40 Pro’s selfies capture more of the scene whereas the Galaxy S20 Ultra feels more like an in your face selfie.

The P40 Pro tended to produce warmer and brighter portraits in daylight, low light, and night situations.

Master of night

Speaking of the night, the P40 Pro’s large sensor is once again hard at work. The images it produced are noticeably brighter letting you see more.

It can work against the P40 Pro if you’re gunning for an image with more shadows than lights, especially if you just like to point and shoot without having to tweak settings too much. That said, it’s still able to capture more detail than the Galaxy S20 Ultra.

Indoor low light is contentious. On one had, the P40 Pro captures a more color accurate scene albeit with less brightness. The Galaxy S20 Ultra on the other hand, produces brighter images but one that, once again, looks like some heavy post-processing had already been applied.

Which one is your GadgetMatch?

This part can only truly be answered by you. If you prefer images high contrast images that are truly striking to the eyes, the Galaxy S2 Ultra might be your pick.

But if you want something that more constantly produces color accurate images, but one that you might need to lower the brightness for, there’s the P40 Pro.

Lastly, while both phones demonstrated the ability to capture great detail, the P4o Pro’s detail retention seems more consistent across all of its lenses. Whether you’re shooting with the main camera, ultra-wide angle, or zooming in, the image just seems sharper altogether.

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Camera Shootouts

Pixel 3a vs iPhone SE: Camera shootout

Two single camera phones in 2020. One damn good shootout.

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Small in size, single rear camera, and both a dollar shy of 400. The iPhone SE and Google Pixel 3a have so much in common.

While some of you might argue, why don’t we wait for the Pixel 4a to compare with the iPhone SE? Let me get back to you with another question: Why should we wait when we can compare two similar phones — both priced at US$ 399 — that are NOW available in the market?

Here, we’re going to have a comprehensive blind test. It’s not going to be the same camera shootout where I messed with y’all because you’ll need a note-taking app or your pen and paper so you can take note of your answers. As usual, no post-processing was done aside from putting the photos together on a collage for faster preview. If you want to cheat, the answers can be found at the end of this article.

Now, let’s dive in!

#1

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Results

iPhone SE: 1A, 2A, 3B, 4B, 5A, 6B, 7A, 8A, 9A, 10B, 11B, 12B, 13A, 14B, 15A, 16A, 17B, 18B, 19A, 20A, 21A, 22B, 23B, 24A, 25A, 26A, 27A, 28A

Pixel 3a: 1B, 2B, 3A, 4A, 5B, 6A, 7B, 8B, 9B, 10A, 11A, 12A, 13B, 14A, 15B, 16B, 17A, 18A, 19B, 20B, 21B, 22A, 23A, 24B, 25B, 26B, 27B, 28B

The iPhone SE and the Pixel 3a have only one rear camera each. The former has a 12Mp wide-angle camera with an f/1.8 lens, while the latter has a 12.2MP wide-angle lens with an f/1.8 lens. Although, the Pixel 3a sports a larger 1/2.55″ image sensor compared to iPhone SE’s 1/3″ image sensor.

However, the results vary when you analyze the photos thoroughly.

Daytime

Both phones take comparable photos when the sun is out. The iPhone SE’s photo is warmer, while the Pixel 3a’s photo has a little bit of dullness to it. As pointed out in a previous blind test on our social platforms, the Pixel 3a adds drama with its gloomy processing.

When it comes to shadows and highlights, the iPhone SE captures it better. Maybe it’s the Smart HDR. The intensity in contrast and shadows made some photos add more depth (and look alive) compared to the Pixel 3a’s flat captures. Thankfully, both phones capture creamy bokeh great for portraits and practicing basic photography.

Lowlight

During sunset, the iPhone SE produces more lively photos while the Pixel 3a still lacks oomph. When there’s barely a source of light, the iPhone SE becomes aggressive with its white balance correction and tends to get noisy.

On the other hand, the Pixel 3a delivers a better shot — with or without Night Sight. Of course, the Night Sight allows you to take excellent photos that are social-media ready and it even works on the Pixel 3a’s selfie camera.

Selfies

The Pixel 3a captures wider selfies, except when you use Portrait Mode. Although, the iPhone SE does a better job at lighting Michael Josh’s face. Gladly, Pixel has Night Sight for selfies which makes this round even.

Zoom

Both the iPhone SE and Pixel 3a offer Digital Zoom, with the former having up to 5x while the latter can shoot up to 7x. When you meticulously look at the zoom samples, Pixel is a clear winner since its Digital Zoom produces more detail. It can even capture a much more legible zoomed-in photo of the Cointreau bottle.

Verdict

The iPhone SE and the Pixel 3a captures excellent photos — both in good and bad lighting conditions. Though, the Pixel 3a delivers better when it comes to Digital Zoom and photos that were taken using Night Sight. Still, both phones are stunning in the camera department despite commanding an affordable price tag. At the end of the day, the user decides based on his/her preference and needs.

For US$ 399, whichever you choose, you’re in good hands. Of course, a camera isn’t the only thing you should look at when checking out smartphones. Watch our head-to-head comparison of iPhone SE and Pixel 3a here.

SEE ALSO: Apple iPhone SE vs Google Pixel 3a: Head to HeadiPhone SE vs iPhone 11 vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Camera shootout

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Camera Shootouts

iPhone SE vs iPhone 11 vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Camera shootout

Battle of the iPhones!

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Can the iPhone SE hold out on its own against the newer iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro Max?

That’s a question we’ve answered on our iPhone SE unboxing and review. The comparison part came and went very quickly though. In this camera shootout, you get a lot of time to look at and analyze the differences between the three iPhones.

Like our usual shootouts, no post-processing was done except for putting the images in a collage for faster loading and preview. It’s labeled A, B, and C so it will be much easier for you to take notes. The answers can be found at the end of this article.

So, let’s begin!

#1 – Blue hour

#2 – Mug & book

#3 – Portrait mode (Daylight)

#4 – Greenery

#5 – Light bulb

#6 – HDR

#7 – Lowlight

#8 – Skyline

#9 – No light

#10 – Portrait mode (Sundown)

#11 – Portrait selfie

#12 – Sunset coffee

#13 – Sunset flare

#14 – Teddy bear

Results

Here are the answers:

A – iPhone SE

B – iPhone 11

C – iPhone 11 Pro Max

If you’ve noticed, the iPhone SE held out on its own during the day, even during sunset and the blue hour.

The three iPhones capture nearly identical results. With Smart HDR, it preserves highlights and shadows to keep it natural, while preserving details in the background. If we’re going to nitpick, the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro Max produce more vibrant colors, and in some cases are sharper with more details.

But other times, it was almost impossible to tell the difference. Nonetheless, this proves that even Apple’s entry-level iPhone — which is a lot cheaper than the iPhone 11 — captures decent and ‘gram-worthy photos. For the price it commands, the iPhone SE is such a steal.

So, what are your thoughts about the new iPhone SE? Did you like the photos captured? Is it your GadgetMatch? Hit us up on our social media platforms and let us know!

SEE ALSO: iPhone SE Review: Flagship Killer?Huawei Mate 30 Pro vs iPhone 11 Pro Max: Camera shootout

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