Enterprise

Singaporean, Philippine stores stop trading for Huawei phones

Consumers are going to online marketplaces instead

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A few days ago, the American government unleashed the most influential decision in recent smartphone history. Effective 90 days after the announcement, Huawei has been banned from conducting business with American companies. As a result, Google — and other relevant companiesblacklisted Huawei from its services.

Naturally, Huawei-induced paranoia is in full swing. Consumers have begun worrying over their favored handsets. Likewise, involved companies have begun assuaging everyone’s fears. Even then, fear is a difficult enemy to eradicate.

Case in point, Asian stores have started dropping Huawei devices from their business models. Particularly, smartphone retailers have ceased their trade-in programs for Huawei products. As reported by Reuters, Singaporean and Philippine markets are steering clear of the brand. Some stores have stopped selling Huawei products altogether.

According to the report, customers are rushing to sell their handsets as soon as possible. They have since flocked to trade-in programs and online marketplaces. For example, Huawei sales have doubled on Carousell, the popular online marketplace.

Unfortunately, brick-and-mortar retailers are not falling for the trend. “If we buy something that is useless, how are we going to sell it,” a Singaporean retailer said.

In the Philippines, smartphone stalls are expressing the same fear. Greenhills, a favored destination for smartphone reselling, has turned down Huawei phones. “We are no longer accepting Huawei phones. It will not be bought by our clients anymore,” a Greenhills saleswoman said. Meanwhile, some stalls are purchasing Huawei products only at 50 percent off.

At this rate, the Huawei ecosystem is slowly deteriorating. Consumers are dumping their handsets, regardless if old or new. Retailers are rushing to empty out their stocks. Owning a Huawei product is a risky gamble right now. However, if anything, no one knows how the situation will resolve itself as of yet.

SEE ALSO: Huawei and Google release official statements regarding trade blacklist

Enterprise

Vietnam’s Viettel develops its own 5G equipment

5G rollout in Vietnam imminent

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The race to 5G is on. Vietnam’s leading carrier, Viettel, just developed its own 5G equipment for use in the country’s transition towards the next-gen cellular service.

Vietnam becomes the sixth globally to develop its own 5G technology. Other countries that built homegrown infrastructure are Sweden’s Ericsson and Finland’s Nokia. Viettel’s development of its own 5G equipment makes it one of the few tech companies to have such capability.

Many countries in Southeast Asia, including the Philippines, are using Huawei infrastructure to launch their 5G service. Vietnam’s resistance to partnering with Huawei stems from its territorial dispute with Beijing over South China Sea.

The carrier will start the rollout in larger cities initially in June. Viettel also intends to use 5G equipment from Nokia for the initial rollout.

In the future, Viettel is looking to supply 5G equipment to its subsidiary carriers in countries like Myanmar and Cambodia. While some may interpret this as the carrier’s potential entry to the competitive 5G equipment market, it has to pay patent royalties owed to Huawei, Ericsson, and other companies.

Vietnam’s rollout of its homegrown 5G equipment is a clear break from other countries willing to pay tech companies for such. Since the Vietnamese government owns it, the carrier will subsidize the full rollout of 5G in the country.

Elsewhere, other countries are scrutinizing tech companies since 5G is a critical infrastructure that is supposed to be free from interference. Huawei has faced an entity ban in American soil over spying concerns regarding its own 5G equipment.

The Chinese company is also facing a similar ban in other countries, but it breathed a sigh of relief last October when the UK reconsidered Huawei for its own 5G rollout.

Source: Nikkei Asian Review

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Dell taking concrete steps towards sustainability, inclusivity

With the help of digital data

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Once in a while, tech companies unveil their roadmaps to orient their mission, vision, and goals into the future. Peering into roadmaps, however, is not enough. Tech companies also need to fulfill their objectives and ensure progress at every step of the way.

Only then will they make progress a reality by ensuring concrete steps to the future.

For Dell, making progress a reality is a matter of listing down bold agenda. As part of its “Progress Made Real” campaign, the company has unveiled three innovative goals it will accomplish by 2030. The company hopes its moonshot goals will drive responsibility and innovation while making societal impact.

Here are Dell’s goals as part of its campaign.

Advancing sustainability

Dell is following the general trend of most companies in reducing carbon footprint and using recyclables with its products. Unlike most companies, however, the company stated concrete goals by 2030 that will make it accountable to the planet.

One of those is recycling an equivalent product for every Dell product a customer buys. Now that’s a bold goal — but necessary if the world will eliminate e-waste. Elsewhere, Dell is also announcing the start of a circular economy by making products from recycled or renewable materials.

That goal is not just an empty promise — after all, Dell already started using bamboo packaging on its XPS 13 laptops.

What remains to be seen, however, is the company’s commitment to 100 percent recycled or renewable materials in all its packaging.

Cultivating inclusion

Part of Dell’s goals for 2030 is ensuring gender inclusivity in its workplace. As such, the company wants 50 percent of its global workforce and 40 percent of global managers to be women.

According to Ronnie Latinazo — Dell’s country manager for the Philippines — the country comes ahead of this goal with 45 percent of the workplace comprised of women.

Country Manager Ronnie Latinazo discussing the future of Dell’s technologies

By 2030, Dell wants 95 percent of its workers educated yearly on issues regarding unconscious bias, harassment, micro-aggression, and privilege. Such a bold goal is sorely needed at a time when more cases of sexual abuse are being uncovered every year.

The company is not lagging on these goals as it already took the first steps with its annual women empowerment summit, which inspires women in the workplace to do more and go the extra mile.

Shaping an ethical company

Establishing a company with ethics at its core means transforming the lives of many people and respecting fundamental human rights. Dell hopes to achieve 75 percent worker participation in charitable giving and community volunteerism. With the help of digital data, the company will make it easier to measure and monitor sustainable living goals for more than a billion people on the planet.

Privacy, as one of the fundamental human rights, remains a top priority for the company’s 2030 goals. By fully automating data control processes and making it easier to access customer’s data, Dell hopes to lead the way when it comes to digital privacy in the 21st century and beyond.

To ensure fulfillment of these goals, the company partnered with its workers, customers, and third-parties in fine-tuning and making progress towards these a reality.

Unveiling a streamlined PowerOne system

Along with making progress in sustainability and inclusivity, Dell is pushing ahead with the expansion of its cloud products designed for business managing dedicated data centers.

Dell recently launched its PowerOne infrastructure, which automates every step in creating and managing a data server for cloud deployment. As such, IT professionals will spend lesser time figuring out how to make software work to ensure smooth operations.

PowerOne is fully automated and uses Kubernetes and Ansible as its back-end technology. It is made up of other singular components such as PowerEdge, PowerMax, PowerSwitch, and PowerProtect. Gone are the days when businesses need to purchase these components individually since they can buy PowerOne to take care of everything.

“We believe that PowerOne would be a game-changer in the industry because it is the first autonomous infrastructure in the market,” said Ronnie Latinazo.

To know more about PowerOne, head to Dell EMC’s site for more information.

Making progress a reality

Dell is facing a challenging decade ahead as it unveils its goals towards a sustainable and inclusive future. With a plethora of options to choose from, the company is ensuring it will be the customers’ go-to brand for everyday computing and professional needs.

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Enterprise

Samsung’s phones are sending information to a Chinese company

But it’s not all bad, according to Samsung

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More than a week into 2020, the Chinese cybersecurity issue still proliferates. Today, the target is Samsung. A few days ago, Reddit presented a comprehensive thread on a concerning issue involving all Samsung smartphones.

Apparently, Samsung’s utility app — called Device Care — obtains one of its features from “a super shady Chinese data-mining/antivirus company called Qihoo 360.” As the name suggests, Qihoo 360 provides the app’s storage scanner. Further, as with most utility apps, Device Care is a mandatory, pre-installed app; you couldn’t delete it, even if you wanted to.

Allegedly, the antivirus provider has a less-than-stellar reputation, even in its own home turf. Among other things, it peddles obnoxious adware and actively hunts down other antivirus software in a device. Similarly, it has also been implicated in spyware cases in the past — including a controversy wherein the company sends user data to the Chinese government.

More than just Chinese fear, the Reddit user also tested the app for any communication with outside servers. Surprisingly enough, Device Care does establish communication with several Chinese servers. Unfortunately, the thread does not detail what information was transferred in the process.

Regardless, the information was enough to spark discussion especially among Western users who remain wary about Chinese involvement in their technology.

However, according to a statement from Samsung Members Korea, Device Care sends only information regarding suspected junk files to Qihoo 360. The app merely cross-references its information with Qihoo 360’s databases to confirm whether a file should be deleted or not.

Additionally, in a statement addressed to The Verge, the sent data includes only generic information such as phone model and OS version. “The storage optimization process, including the scanning and removal of junk files, is fully managed by Samsung’s device care solution,” the statement said.

Put simply, there’s nothing to be worried about. Unfortunately, Samsung’s statement will not quell the world’s fears against Chinese technology. Currently, China’s technology sector is still waging a defensive war against all front all over the world.

SEE ALSO: Samsung copies Apple’s logos for CES keynote

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