Enterprise

Philippines: Huawei ban ‘will have a little impact’ on the country

States the Philippines’ robust cybersecurity measures

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Throughout the past few days, the Huawei debacle has devastated companies and consumers across the globe. Everyone is falling for the fear. Huawei’s long-standing suppliers have cut ties with the company. Huawei’s consumers are getting rid of their favored headsets. The wave has swept the whole world.

Naturally, the Philippines isn’t immune. Recently, smartphone retailers and resellers have started refusing Huawei devices from their stores. Local Huawei users can’t easily sell their devices to the second-hand market anymore.

However, an important question still stands. How much will the Huawei ban affect the Philippines?

Of course, the ban originates from Trump’s trade war against China. Among other reasons, the American government cites the company’s inherent cybersecurity risks as the prime motivator. Supposedly, Huawei’s telecommunications hardware can transmit valuable data to the Chinese government. Given the Philippines’ proximity to China, are we also at risk?

According to the Department of Information and Communications Technology, Huawei’s ban “will have a little impact in the Philippine telecommunications industry.” Shared through a Facebook post, the DICT assures users of the country’s robust cybersecurity measures. As of now, the department has not reported any cybersecurity breaches coming from Huawei equipment.

Likewise, shortly after the news broke, local telcos confirmed continued support for Huawei’s devices. According to the DICT, “they will diversify in their present and future procurements of equipment to make their networks more robust and future proof.” The department is also imposing strict rules on local telcos regarding network monitoring. The statement also quickly adds the imposition of the same rules on a potential third telco.

Is the DICT’s statement believable? For now, Huawei’s impact is still marginal at best. Companies and consumers are going on the perceived risk of the future. Right now, Huawei has not announced drastic changes to its products yet. Existing Huawei products still support Google.

Of course, cybersecurity is another issue. The risk will always exist when foreign companies control the telecommunications equipment of another country. At the very least, the DICT isn’t treating the whole debacle as a non-issue. Hopefully, the department’s promises are an optimistic sign for the country’s telecommunications industry.

SEE ALSO: Huawei granted 90-day extension before total ban

Enterprise

Samsung’s phones are sending information to a Chinese company

But it’s not all bad, according to Samsung

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More than a week into 2020, the Chinese cybersecurity issue still proliferates. Today, the target is Samsung. A few days ago, Reddit presented a comprehensive thread on a concerning issue involving all Samsung smartphones.

Apparently, Samsung’s utility app — called Device Care — obtains one of its features from “a super shady Chinese data-mining/antivirus company called Qihoo 360.” As the name suggests, Qihoo 360 provides the app’s storage scanner. Further, as with most utility apps, Device Care is a mandatory, pre-installed app; you couldn’t delete it, even if you wanted to.

Allegedly, the antivirus provider has a less-than-stellar reputation, even in its own home turf. Among other things, it peddles obnoxious adware and actively hunts down other antivirus software in a device. Similarly, it has also been implicated in spyware cases in the past — including a controversy wherein the company sends user data to the Chinese government.

More than just Chinese fear, the Reddit user also tested the app for any communication with outside servers. Surprisingly enough, Device Care does establish communication with several Chinese servers. Unfortunately, the thread does not detail what information was transferred in the process.

Regardless, the information was enough to spark discussion especially among Western users who remain wary about Chinese involvement in their technology.

However, according to a statement from Samsung Members Korea, Device Care sends only information regarding suspected junk files to Qihoo 360. The app merely cross-references its information with Qihoo 360’s databases to confirm whether a file should be deleted or not.

Additionally, in a statement addressed to The Verge, the sent data includes only generic information such as phone model and OS version. “The storage optimization process, including the scanning and removal of junk files, is fully managed by Samsung’s device care solution,” the statement said.

Put simply, there’s nothing to be worried about. Unfortunately, Samsung’s statement will not quell the world’s fears against Chinese technology. Currently, China’s technology sector is still waging a defensive war against all front all over the world.

SEE ALSO: Samsung copies Apple’s logos for CES keynote

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CES 2020

Samsung copies Apple’s logos for CES keynote

Almost identical to FaceID and TouchID logos

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Image source: Samsung

These days, every smartphone maker has a feature that everyone else has. Everyone has bezel-less designs, multi-camera setups, and facial recognition software, for example. However, despite the industry’s tendency to share features with one another, every company has their own take or branding. It’s an unwritten rule that companies can have the same features as another, only if the branding is different.

Oddly enough, Samsung breached this rule recently. At a CES 2020 press conference, the company copied one of Apple’s most prized technologies in recent history. During the company’s talk on cybersecurity, the keynote presented its latest investments in the industry, including facial recognition software. However, in presenting the new information, Samsung used an all-too-familiar image: Apple’s FaceID logo.

More precisely, Samsung’s weird facsimile has thicker lines and tighter spacing. Regardless, the resemblance is damning. Of course, Samsung did not advertise or claim any involvement with Apple’s products. That said, the blunder is a big one, especially considering that both companies have engaged in copyright spats in the past.

Similarly, Samsung’s included graphic for fingerprint recognition is also remarkably similar to Apple’s TouchID.

Samsung has not clarified the blunder. On the other hand, Apple has also remained silent. If anything, Samsung’s mistake is a source of lighthearted amusement in this year’s CES event.

SEE ALSO: Samsung QLED 8K TV: Future-proof your TV viewing

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Enterprise

Vivo, OPPO, Xiaomi are working together for faster data transfers

Transfers can reach up to 20MB/s

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This year, the world is finally getting consumer-friendly 5G internet. After months of stalling, we are ready for the future.

Naturally, higher internet speeds come with larger file sizes. Why should you skimp on file sizes when you have the world’s most cutting-edge technology? Unfortunately, this can mean only one thing. Our devices are burdened with a game of catch-up: larger storages and faster transfer speeds.

Thankfully, storage capacities are already developing larger solutions. Likewise, albeit in a smaller capacity, we are on the cups of faster data transferring.

Particularly, Vivo, Xiaomi, and OPPO have formed an alliance for a higher standard in data transferring. Officially named the “Peer-to-Peer Transmission Alliance,” the deal will deliver seamless transferring without installing third-party software or ruining your monthly data allowance. According to a press release, transfer speeds can reach up to 20MB/s.

Transfers between the three brands will use two different technologies simultaneously: Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. The devices will use Bluetooth to pair. After pairing, they will use Wi-Fi P2P to transfer the files. Additionally, both users can still use their devices while the transfer completes.

Of the three brands, OPPO and Vivo make the most sense. Both brands are under the same parent company. Xiaomi’s inclusion is surprising but welcome.

The new feature will roll out across Vivo products starting February in select markets. Unfortunately, no word yet on the other two brands and in specific devices or markets.

SEE ALSO: Vivo NEX 3 review: More now than next

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