Entertainment

Samsung is shooting an 8K Korean film using the Galaxy S20

To release in 8K, 16:9 resolution

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Are you ready for 8K entertainment? Ready or not, the next evolution in resolution is coming. In fact, today’s smartphones already have the ability to shoot 8K video, fitting perfectly well with the recent influx of 8K TVs. All that’s left is actual content. Blessed with a growing list of 8K-compatible hardware, Samsung is shooting an 8K Korean film using the Galaxy S20 series.

Announced through the company’s South Korean newsroom, Samsung will mostly use the Galaxy S20 and the Galaxy Note 20 to shoot the short film titled Untact. The company will release the 8K film in select cinemas in South Korea. To ensure safety, the film will show for only small batches of people. Besides the small theatrical release, Samsung will also release the film through its YouTube channel.

South Korean director Kim Jee-Woon will helm the film. The director is most known for popular thrillers such as The Last Stand (featuring Arnold Schwarzenegger) and A Tale of Two Sisters. Meanwhile, Train to Busan’s Kim Joo-Heon and Kim Go-eun will star in the film. The film is a romance flick focusing on the effects of non-face-to-face communication.

Historically, Samsung isn’t the only tech maker foraying into the film business. This year, Apple also shot its own film using an iPhone 11 Pro, among other attempts.

Regardless of the obvious marketing for both companies, technology has undoubtedly progress far beyond the expectations of a regular smartphone from a decade ago. Amidst the rise of 8K entertainment, smartphones are rushing to catch up with modern filmmaking gear. Though the industry will always prefer filmmaker equipment, the smartphone’s capability is there and ripe for the taking.

SEE ALSO: Selena Gomez’s new music video was shot on an iPhone 11 Pro

Entertainment

TWICE will feature in K/DA’s comeback EP

On the track called ‘I’ll Show You’

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Credit: Riot Games and JYPETWICE

Riot Games’ own girl group recent released a single called The Baddest” and it’s part of an album that also features popular K-Pop girl group TWICE.

TWICE will be featured in the track “I’ll Show You” along with Bekuh Boom, and Anika Wells). A representative from Riot Games confirmed to Polygon that all nine members of TWICE participated in the track. The other tracks in the album are as follows:

  • The Baddest (featuring Soyeon and Miyeon of (G)I-dle, Bea Miller, Wolftyla)
  • More (featuring Madison Beer, Soyeon and Miyeon of (G)I-dle, Lexie Liu, Jaira Burns, Seraphine)
  • Villain (featuring Madison Beer, Kim Petras)
  • Drum Go Dum (featuring Aluna, Wolftyla, Bekuh Boom)

K/DA is a virtual girl group that debuted in 2018. The group is composed of four themed versions of League of Legends heroes Ahri, Akali, Evelynn, and Kai’Sa.

American singers Madison Beer and Jaira Burns voiced Evelynn and Kai’Sa during their debut. They were replaced by Bea Miller and Wolftyla in 2020. Meanwhile, Ahri and Akali are voiced by Miyeon and Soyeon who are members of K-Pop girl group (G)I-dle.

TWICE is a K-Pop girl group that debuted in 2016 with the title track “Like OOH-AAH” and have since released hit after hit after their first comeback track “Cheer Up.” The group is preparing to release their second full album titled Eyes Wide Open on October 26 with the title track “I Can’t Stop Me.”

h/t: Polygon


SEE ALSO:
What is TWICE’s GadgetMatch?
Making TWICE art with the Samsung Galaxy Tab S7+
Watching TWICELIGHTS on a 75″ Samsung 4K QLED TV

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Netflix faces charges for sexualizing children

Over controversial film “Cuties”

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Contrary to what you might expect, Netflix’s most controversial film this year is not The Social Dilemma. Released on Netflix this year, Cuties, a French film about 11-year old girls, sparked a larger wave of controversy since its release. Now, Netflix faces charges for sexualizing children.

A grand jury in Texas recently indicted Netflix for showing Cuties on its platform. According to Texas Representative Matt Schaefer, the film “depicts lewd exhibition of [the] pubic area of a clothed or partially clothed child who was younger than 18 years of age which appeals to the prurient interest of sex.”

Texas’s allegations stem from the film’s poster controversy back in August. To promote the film, Netflix used a poster depicting the child actresses posing like a sexualized pop band. Notably, the film’s original French poster was more innocuous, lacking Netflix’s sexual overtones.

The film itself is “a social commentary against the sexualization of young children,” as explained by Netflix in a statement to Reuters. “This charge is without merit and we stand by the film.”

For its part, the platform took down their poster and apologized for the blunder. Regardless, numerous pundits and governments across the globe have rallied against and banned the film from showing. Before the poster controversy in August, the film won an award during its premiere at January’s Sundance Film Festival.

SEE ALSO: How to set and use parental controls on Netflix

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3 must-haves when traveling, in case you want to be like ‘Emily in Paris’

Never ever forget these!

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Spoiler Alert: If you haven’t seen Emily in Paris, please read with caution.

Bonjour, mademoiselles and monsieurs!

I’m certain I’m not the only one obsessed with French culture, and of course, the latest Netflix series — Emily in Paris.

In case you’ve been living under the rock, Emily in Paris re-awakened people’s lust for travel. A bit of escape from the horrific reality we’re currently facing; a year that has gone haywire.

Think croissants, cobblestones, fine architecture, chic fashion, good food, art, and sex. This is the surface of what Emily in Paris is about: Emily Cooper’s hilarious misadventures in navigating her career, romance, and friendships.

Photo NETFLIX

While the series showcases how Emily documents her life and adventures in Paris through Instagram, there are a few things she forgot to bring. For a supposedly tech-savvy millennial, Emily Cooper forgot some travel essentials. Or maybe she didn’t know she needed them.

Based on a few episodes from Emily in Paris, I realized what gadgets must be deemed travel essentials, so we don’t experience Emily Cooper’s misadventures next time we’re in another country.

A battery-powered vibrator (so you don’t blow up the fuse)

First of all, Emily was in a long-distance relationship with her boyfriend in Chicago. The couple was having sexy time via video call but crappy internet connection got in the way.

To continue pleasing herself, Emily pulled out an effin’ gigantic, old-school wired vibrator. After plugging it into an electric socket, the vibrator short-circuited the electricity in her apartment. The blow-up was so bad, it shut down the power in the entire neighborhood.

As funny as it is (and no, it wouldn’t really happen in real life), there are a lot of battery-powered, wireless vibrators. Some are even high-tech enough to be controlled by your partner through a mobile app.

Consider this next time when you travel. Although before you pack your sex toy, make sure it’s not illegal in the country you will visit. In some Islamic countries, they confiscate toys as they fall under pornographic material. Last thing you want is to get persecuted in a foreign land.

An instax printer or a pocketable instax camera

Paris is the so-called city of romance. You can literally feel the love in the air. Throughout the series, Emily captured streets, everyday moments, and her life in Paris and uploaded it to her Instagram account.

But to travel — or live — in a romantic city, moments should be captured in a sentimental and romantic way. For instance, preserving memories through a pocketable instax camera which you can bring anywhere, or an instax printer where you can print your photos directly from your smartphone.

That’s exactly what we did one Sunday morning along Upper East Side in New York City. That je ne sais quoi of summer in the city is not something anyone can describe with mere words or capture on Instagram without losing its essence. Of course, we weren’t able to, either.

But we caught some vignettes on film, complete with audio recordings using the Instax Mini LiPlay. We found a way to reminisce those moments. That’s something we believe should be part of any travel.

Get a smartwatch or other running essentials

Forgive me for crying out loud, but smartwatches are made to accompany you while you run. Not hold your gigantic phone with tiny hands, huffing and puffing along the river Seine.

It’s a good idea that Emily didn’t forget how important working out is. But it’s not exactly a good idea to hold your phone while you run. Better to invest in a smartwatch like the Apple Watch to measure your heart rate, track your miles, and answer calls while you listen to music through your wireless earbuds.

And if you’re not the smartwatch-wearing type, invest in pockets, running pouches, arm wallets, or wrist straps. There are different ways to safeguard your phones, keys, and other essentials without putting yourself in potential danger.

Besides, Paris — like any other city — isn’t exactly crime-free. You can’t keep running around like crimes don’t happen. Even when I was running around Taipei, a city with low crime rate, I didn’t let my guard down. The same goes for traveling to any other city. It’s always best to keep yourself safe, no one else will do it for you.

Stream Emily in Paris on Netflix.

SEE ALSO: 24 Hours in Paris | Sights and sounds of summer in the Upper East Side | 5 lessons we learned from Crash Landing on You

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