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TCL NXTPAPER is new tablet tech for the new normal

And other new devices perfect for the new normal!

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TCL is showing off their newest display technology — NXTPAPER — along with two new TCL tablets. The NXTPAPER display technology features a reflective screen to repurpose natural light. This is what makes it the world’s first “zero eye strain” display on larger screen devices. TCL is also introducing two new tablets to in their 10 Series: TCL 10 TABMAX and TCL 10 TABMID.

NXTPAPER Technology

TCL’s NXTPAPER Technology is an artistic combination of screen and paper. It is TCL’s culmination of two years of product research and design. They’ve even had to make 11 patents for eye protection testing in the process. This display technology promises to provide Full-HD definition with a paper-like immersive visual experience.

You get to experience everything in full color with no flicker, no stutter, and no harmful blue light. To achieve this, they combined a highly reflective screen to reuse natural light. This display technology reduces eye strain and has received eye protection certifications from the German Rhine laboratory, SGS laboratory, and German VDE.

When tested, TCL claims that the NXTPAPER performed better with contrast output and battery efficiency compared to a typical LCD panel. Not to mention, it somewhat lives up to its name by achieving all this while being slimmer and lighter. Designed with a larger format device in mind, TCL brought in their NXTPAPER technology to their tablets. With this technology, they hope to have stepped up in creating the ideal technology for learning and reading.

TCL 10 TABMAX

The TCL 10 TABMAX features another new display technology: NXTVISION. With this technology,  the display is able to deliver on stunning vibrant colors and rich details. The tablet has a 10.36-inch FHD+ display, 8.3mm narrow bezels, and a widescreen layout that allows you to unleash your full creative juices without holding back. With ultra-low latency, a natural in-hand feel, and elegant design, the TCL Stylus lets you write and draw like you would on paper.

The TCL 10 TABMAX comes with an 8-megapixel front-facing camera, a 13-megapixel rear-facing camera and a large 8000 mAh battery for your daily grind of work. The tablet also features a Kids Mode for parental surveillance if needed. It will be available across select regions globally in both 4G and Wi-Fi-only models making this tablet a great companion for work, study, and play anywhere.

The TCL 10 TABMAX is available in October for EUR 299 for the 4G variant and EUR 249 for the Wi-Fi only variant, respectively.

TCL 10 TABMID

The TCL 10 TABMID offers high-quality features for your daily grind of work and study in a lighter, sleeker design. Weighing in at a mere 325g, this tablet won’t be weighing you down wherever you take it. The TCL 10 TABMID has an 8-inch FHD IPS display decked out with NXTVISION too.

The TCL TABMID can power through movies, games, emails, and more with its 5500 mAh battery. The tablet features a one-touch fingerprint sensor for easy log-in and security, Kids Mode for parental surveillance, and a special-edition dark blue back cover. It offers a 5-megapixel front-facing camera and an 8megapixel rear-facing camera. Overall, the tablet looks to be a great all-around device for students and working adults amid the new normal.

The TCL TABMID offers both Wi-Fi and 4G connectivity and will be available in October for EUR 229.

Apps

TikTok, Reels clone YouTube Shorts launches in the US

Everyone wants a piece of the pie

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shorts

YouTube unveiled its short-video-making tool called Shorts last year, but it was in beta and limited to India. Shorts is now available to all creators in the US after testing them with select creators.

The initial release was quite hasty as it was supposed to bridge the vacuum left by TikTok’s ban in India. However, Instagram was much faster and well prepared to take on the challenge, dominating the turf over many local apps like Chingari, Roposo, and MX TakaTak.

YouTube is also adding a dedicated space in the bottom tab by replacing the explore button. In India, YouTube Shorts has a dedicated space on the top bar of the app. YouTube also displays Shorts in the home feed of the app after around 2-3 videos.

The goal is to incorporate a short video format in the existing app. While watching a “short”, users can tap on the music option to hear the full song via YouTube. Soon, the feature also will work the other way: From a YouTube music video, you will be able to click a “create” button right from the video to make your own Short.

Shorts will expand

The video platform’s music team has signed licensing agreements to use snippets of millions of songs from over 250 labels and publishers. It plans to expand Shorts to more markets later this year but it hasn’t specified which ones.

Ahead of the US launch, a bunch of new features has been added as well. There’s now an option to record 60-second clips in addition to the 15-second option. But users will not be able to add music from the YouTube library to 60-second Shorts. There are also new filters and effects in the YouTube Shorts camera.

In its most recent earnings report, YouTube confirmed that Shorts were generating 6.5 billion daily views, a substantial uptick over the 3.5 billion daily views that the feature was generating in late January.

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After years of settling, Twitter is finally waking up to new features

There’s so many of them in 2021

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Twitter has been around for a long time, and it has changed a lot since its debut. The micro-blogging platform was infamous for its 140 character limit, an intentional limitation that ensured everything on the site is short, crisp, and to the point. It’s no surprise that Twitter became the go-to website for news, independent alerts, and much more within no time.

Although, if you’ve been a Twitter user for a decade, you’ll know that the platform hasn’t changed much in all these years. Twitter did increase the length limit to 280 characters in 2017, but it had little change in the overall behavior of users. Twitter was always an easy-to-use “blog,” and it was happy being in its little inconquerable bubble.

Things are changing fast this year as Twitter aggressively adds new features and intends to open a subscription model soon. Obviously, there won’t be any change in the way we tweet or interact, but the number of features we have will surely increase. The platform is still silent about the most asked feature — the edit button on tweets. But rest assured, the classic Twitter experience isn’t going away anytime soon.


In fact, it’s going to get a lot more interesting as the platform now supports Spaces, a feature that allows users to join virtual rooms where they can engage in real-time audio conversations with others. Instead of typing, why not just talk candidly to all your followers?

Twitter began working on the audio-chat feature in November 2020, and it was available for beta and alpha users a few months ago. It’s now ready for public use, and any user with more than 600 followers can create a room and start talking. Audio-only features are the trend, and every company, including Facebook and Spotify, is doubling down on it.

Twitter has also confirmed that it is working on an upcoming feature called “Ticket Spaces.” This feature will allow users to create Spaces that require others to purchase a ticket to join. The platform has never been so keen on monetization, but the shift in strategy is clearly visible. Hosts will earn the majority of revenue from ticket sales, while Twitter will pocket a small fee.


In January 2021, Twitter discreetly acquired Revue, a Dutch startup that allows users to publish and monetize email newsletters. Just like SubStack, Revue lets you create your own newsletter and monetize it. However, what’s special here is, the newsletter is now integrated within Twitter. So, it makes it easier to persuade your existing followers to subscribe, helping you directly monetize your reach on Twitter.

The feature is already available on Twitter’s web app. Many say that a newsletter doesn’t work in Twitter’s favor, but the company tends to disagree.

“Many established writers and publishers have built their brand on Twitter, amassing an audience that’s hungry for the next article or perspective they Tweet. Our goal is to make it easy for them to connect with their subscribers while also helping readers better discover writers and their content. We’re imagining many ways to do this, from allowing people to sign up for newsletters from their favorite follows on Twitter to new settings for writers to host conversations with their subscribers. It will all work seamlessly,” said Kayvon, Product Lead at Twitter.


New functionality isn’t the only thing that’s keeping the engineers busy. The platform has always attracted controversy due to moderation, troll attacks, and indecent behavior. Thousands of accounts are removed every week to ensure community guidelines are followed to maintain a safe space for everyone.

In 2020, the company began testing a new safety mechanism that prompts users to reconsider before they reply to a tweet using “harmful” language.

If a user types out a reply with any of the language that the company has deemed harmful, they’ll see a warning message asking, “Want to review this before tweeting? We’re asking people to review replies with potentially harmful or offensive language.”

While this may not seem like much, previous reports have shown that these minor design-based hurdles help curb negativity. Based on trials, Twitter said that 34 percent of people revised their initial reply after seeing the prompt or chose not to send the reply at all.


Lastly, Twitter has changed the way its algorithm crops a picture to show it on the timeline. Now, when users tweet a photo uploaded with their iOS or Android device, it will appear in the timeline in its entirety. There’ll be no cropping, so you won’t be forced to open the picture and see all the details.

Earlier, the algorithm would determine the most sensible part of the picture, crop it, and show a preview on the feed. This prompted many to share memes that could be completely seen only when the picture is opened. Else, it could look context-free and random. While most users are cheering the minor change, many feel that the surprise element behind seeing a photo is now gone. Fair to say, it’s going to be impossible to please everyone!

Though, we’d really appreciate it if Twitter could give us an edit button as well.

Read Also: Twitter acquires ad-removing news app Scroll

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Twitter acquires ad-removing news app Scroll

Gearing up its subscription model

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Twitter has now acquired the ad-removing service Scroll, which automatically removes ads from partner websites in return for a monthly subscription. The service will not be available temporarily but will soon be incorporated into Twitter.

“Scroll will become a meaningful addition to our subscriptions work as we build and shape a future subscription service on Twitter,” Twitter product manager Mike Park said in a blog post. The micro-blogging platform has been working on a subscription model for quite some time, and we’re slowly getting hints of what to expect from it.

While details remain scarce, Twitter’s forthcoming subscription services seem poised to be Twitter’s answer to paid news aggregation apps like Apple News. Most users frequently use Twitter for news updates. Its inherent design has made it an ideal social networking platform to catch up on the news.

Currently, Scroll’s service extends to hundreds of sites, including The Verge, Buzzfeed, Gizmodo, USA Today, and many others. Although the app is down at the moment, Twitter says it will continue to support Scroll’s existing customers and publishers, as well as allow new publishers to join.

It also recently acquired Revue, a newsletter startup that intends to make money via subscription. The feature has already been synced with Twitter’s web app and ready for deployment. Struggling with disappointing growth numbers, the social network is now trying to find new sources of revenue.

While not specifically mentioned in Twitter’s blog post, Twitter’s purchase of Scroll will also impact Nuzzle, an app acquired by Scroll in 2019 that became popular for helping people create a news feed curated from stories shared by people they follow on Twitter.

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