Features

5 reasons to stick with Samsung after Note 7 disaster

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Without a doubt, Samsung’s image has taken a major hit after the Galaxy Note 7 debacle. What people fail to consider, however, are all the exciting things the tech specialist has been cooking up lately.

While these won’t extinguish the damage already dealt, our reasons for sticking with Samsung are meant to restore faith in the world’s number one smartphone manufacturer. After all, the Note 7 was just one failure in a sea of undeniable success.

The Galaxy S8 is going to be amazing

If history repeats itself, the next Galaxy S smartphone will be a game-changer. Recall how the Galaxy S5 introduced waterproofing and excellent photography to the series, the S6 made the glass back and metal frame combo a thing for Samsung, and the S7 became the definition of refinement for all tech products.

Based on the recent leaks and rumors, the upcoming Galaxy S8 — assuming Samsung doesn’t skip a number this time — will be yet another needle mover. We can expect a unique dual-camera setup, an improved iris scanner with additional security measures, and the usual “best chipset available” at the time of announcement.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Samsung made curved displays cool

We should also believe in Sammy’s capacity to learn from its mistakes. Since no Android or Apple rival has a show-stopping product lined up for early next year, there’ll be no reason to rush shipments for its flagship, like what happened to the ill-fated Galaxy Note.

Galaxy Note 7 victims will get incentives

As the dust slowly settles, Samsung is coming up with ways to ease the pain of fallen Note 7 users.

We recently covered an upgrade program being offered, in which anyone who’s replaced their unit with a Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge is eligible to do another trade for the upcoming S8 or Note 8. In addition, customers would only have to pay half the amount of an S7 to receive an S8. It’s admittedly confusing, but at least we know steps are being taken to rectify the problems surrounding the two sets of recalls.

[irp posts=”7216″ name=”Note 7 owners in Korea to get 50 percent discount on ‘S8 or Note 8′”]

As of the moment, the program is only available in the South Korean market, but it’s only a matter of time before it extends to the rest of the world, since every user is a victim.

Samsung is already developing next-generation tech

This part probably won’t matter to casual users, but anyone with a techie thumb will understand the boundaries Samsung is currently pushing.

It’s a given that the upcoming Galaxy S flagships will have the best of the best specifications, and we have Samsung’s development teams to thank for this.

The Korean tech giant has begun production of chipsets using 10nm FinFET technology, which could be a first for the industry. What this means is newer processors equipped on future Galaxy devices will run a lot faster and cooler than the 14nm chips used on current smartphones, resulting in a smoother user experience and less power consumption.

[irp posts=”7166″ name=”Midrange Samsung Galaxy C9 Pro has 6GB RAM”]

On top of that, Samsung has already rolled out another first in the industry: an 8GB memory package for mobile gadgets. In comparison, recent smartphones such as the new Galaxy C9 Pro are maxed out at 6GB of memory. This will boost a device’s multitasking abilities, and allow more complex apps and games to be produced.

The Galaxy S7 Edge and Note 5 are fantastic deals now

Depending on where you reside, you can score great deals on the Galaxy S7 Edge and last year’s Note 5. Be warned, though: The latter could be experiencing a minor price hike, considering it’s the best Android handset right now with a stylus pen.

You don’t have to look any further than our Galaxy S7 and Note 5 video reviews to know what they bring to the table:

Samsung reached near perfection with the Note 7

It’s easy to forget how close the Galaxy Note 7 was to smartphone perfection. Practically every media outlet praised it as the best Android device this year — or, of all time. 

We believe some of the blame for the Note 7’s troubles goes to its excessiveness, packing so many high-tech features in such a pocketable frame and short amount of production time. The successor, if everything works out, should either dial down the innovation or rely on its tinier manufacturing process to pull off a realistic product.

Our own hands-on review spoke of how much we loved the phone:

Do you have reasons of your own why you’d stick with Samsung? We’d love to hear from you in the comments section below.

Hands-On

Huawei Mate 20 Pro Hands-on: Best phone of 2018?

Huawei outdoes itself again

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In an industry where incremental updates are the new norm, Huawei manages to wow us again — barely a year after the release of the P20 Pro. The Chinese company is back with the Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro which might just be the best among the best this year.

In this video, we go over the phones’ new designs, updated cameras, and new memory card format. We also go through the differences between the Huawei Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro.

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Features

Huawei Mate 20 vs Mate 20 Pro: What are the differences?

Price isn’t the only factor

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Huawei has once again launched two flagships phones at the same time; one comes with a Pro moniker, while the other does not. Like before, there are some significant differences between the Mate 20 pair to take note of.

While we wait to get our hands on the Porsche Design Mate 20 RS and Mate 20 X, here are the two phones we already know everything about.

Display

One obvious difference is in their displays. While the Mate 20 Pro goes for a notched 6.39-inch 1440p curved HDR OLED display — certainly a mouthful — the regular Mate 20 has a 6.53-inch 1080p RGBW HDR LCD with a much smaller notch.

The Pro model justifies the larger notch by housing a more complex camera system for secured facial recognition, but if that doesn’t matter to you, the regular variant’s Dew Drop notch may be more appealing — and definitely less intrusive.

In addition, the Mate 20 Pro’s OLED tech allows it to curve the edges and equip an in-display fingerprint scanner. It’s essentially the more modern-looking design of the pair.

Performance

Since both models have Huawei’s Kirin 980 chipset installed, pure performance is virtually identical. The Pro and non-Pro also share the same memory and storage configuration of 6GB and 128GB, respectively, although the plain Mate 20 has a more affordable 4GB memory variant available, too.

Another minor difference: The 4200mAh capacity of the Mate 20 Pro, along with the more energy-efficient OLED, provides it with potentially longer battery life than what the Mate 20’s 4000mAh capacity and LCD panel offer.

A more significant advantage for the Mate 20 Pro is its inclusion of a 40W SuperCharge adapter in the package — noticeably better than the 22.5W output of the Mate 20’s. Plus, the Pro version can charge other phones wirelessly using wireless reverse charging tech.

Cameras

Perhaps, you’ll care most about the difference in camera quality and performance. While it’s too early to make photo and video comparisons, an initial look at specs shows that the Mate 20 Pro may have an edge.

There are three modules in place for the Pro: One is a 40-megapixel main camera, another has 20 megapixels and an ultra-wide lens, and the final unit offers 8 megapixels with 3x optical zoom

As for the Mate 20, its main camera has only 12 megapixels, the ultra-wide shooter settles for 16 megapixels, and the 8-megapixel telephoto camera goes up to only 2x optical zoom.

Despite the larger notch of the Mate 20 Pro, they share the same 24-megapixel selfie camera.

Pricing and colors

This part largely depends on where you reside, but in an ideal setting, all five colors — Emerald Green, Midnight Blue, Twilight, Pink Gold, and Black — should be available for both models.

Pricing is another matter, and it again depends per region. In Europe, the Mate 20’s 4GB+128GB configuration retails for EUR 799 and its 6GB+128GB model goes for EUR 849. The Mate 20 Pro’s sole 6GB+128GB variant costs EUR 1,049, making it more expensive by EUR 250 and EUR 200, respectively.

In Singapore, the Mate 20’s 6GB+128GB setup retails for SG$ 998, while the Mate 20 Pro is at SG$ 1,348 — a difference of SG$ 350.

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Huawei Mate 20 series first to have Nano Memory Card

Could this become a trend?

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Aside from introducing a host of flagship features to the freshly minted Mate 20 series, Huawei also introduced a new memory card standard, simply named Nano Memory Card.

It’s available on both the Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro, and it effectively replaces the microSD slot we’ve become so accustomed to. The question is: What’s so special about it?

The simplest answer is that it has the same size as the nano-SIM card inside any smartphone today. Because of the identical dimensions, the secondary card slot doesn’t have to be designed differently, like what has been done for microSD cards.

In the case of the Mate 20 series, the removable card tray has back-to-back slots: one for the nano-SIM, and the other for either another nano-SIM or separate Nano Memory Card.

As of writing, Huawei will be offering 128GB and 256GB NM Cards, with speeds of up to 90MB/s.

It’s certainly a more efficient way of adding physical storage to a handset, and allows manufactures like Huawei to use the saved space for other features, like a large battery.

Looking ahead, it seems only logical for other smartphone brands to follow suit, but that would mean consumers would have to buy into a whole new standard and let go of their microSD cards.

The same thing happened with the introduction of the USB-C port, wherein users had to replace their micro-USB cables for the newer, more intuitive system. It’s been a gradual process, but definitely rewarding.

It’ll take a while before we find out if this will become a trend, but for now, we should appreciate Huawei’s courage in taking the first, big step.

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