Gaming

Step into androids’ shoes in Detroit: Become Human

How ready are we for a world filled with androids?

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The year is 2038. Androids — machines with human-like features, not the mobile operating system — walk among us. If it sounds familiar, that’s because this kind of story has been told and retold countless times in books, movies,and television shows like a sci-fi cliché.

However, what makes Quantic Dream’s interactive drama game Detroit: Become Human an outlier, as opposed to its many thematic brethren, is when it is set. In most iterations of the androids and/or robots narrative, they’re set in a distant future. This game takes place in 2038, a time that doesn’t seem too far off (that’s 20 years from now!).


So, think about it: Can a real-life Cyber Life — the company responsible for making these androids — rise up between now and then? It’s not too far-fetched of an idea. As early as now, we’re already worried about artificial intelligence (AI) taking over human jobs, not to mention stories tackling how AI-powered humanoids can take our place in the sack.

Androids line up on a shed to recharge

It’s a future that is both fascinating and terrifying. Sure, we might be ready for the logistical challenges it might pose, but how prepared are we as a society to take on the psychological, moral, and ethical issues that may arise when this future comes?

These potential realities are precisely what the people at Quantic Dream want us to face in this game. At nearly every turn, what you decide to do will lead to a different outcome. This component of the game could have you playing for hours on end. During the briefing, Co-Chief Executive Officer of Quantic Dream and Executive Producer of Detroit: Become Human, Guillaume de Fondaumiére, mentioned that the opening scene “The Hostage” alone already has six potential endings — all of which you can opt to go through.

Flowchart of the opening scene “The Hostage”

Multiple narratives

Another thing that makes Detroit: Become Human, in Fondaumiére’s words, “rather unique,” is that it’s not bogged down by a short running time because it’s a game. This allowed them and allows us to explore the many aspects of this potential reality.

“The great thing about Detroit is it can tell a story for 30 to 40 hours. That lets you explore a great number of themes,” said Fondaumiére. “And the other thing is that it’s a game. We give the player the possibility to tell his or her own story.”

This story is told through three perspectives, albeit all through android lenses. First, there’s Kara, a house help android, designed and programmed primarily for housekeeping chores. Then there’s Connor, a Cyber Life agent whose tasks involve helping solve the mystery of why and how certain androids appear to be breaking their programming. Lastly, there’s Markus whose owner is an accomplished but old and ill artist who encourages him to think for himself.

Kara with her light indicator turning yellow which means the situation could be escalating

How did they end up with three characters? Fondaumiére shares that as the story was being written, the game’s director and writer David Cage had more questions about this world that they were building, and it led them to the conclusion that “it didn’t make sense” for all these questions to be asked only through a single perspective.

“Using different characters gave [David] the possibility to get different perspectives and to be able to create the bedrock for these questions to emerge,” said Fondaumiére.

Connor and Lt. Anderson in the car right before examining a crime scene

Fondaumiére broke down the perspectives for each character: “Kara, I guess, we’re touching upon the emotional and social sides of these questions. With Connor, we’re investigating androids. What happens? What makes them become emotional? Sentient? And with Markus we’re centered around the question of freedom. What if, all of a sudden, these androids no longer want to be our slaves? What if they start to question their place in our society? What will they do?”

Markus administers medicine for his old and ill owner

Markus lives with an old, accomplished artist that influenced his views on freedom

Gripping story, stunning visuals

The idea is great and the execution, perhaps, even better. Playing Detroit: Become Human feels like binge-watching a Netflix series but with you at the helm. The cinematography in each shot feels well thought-out, the visuals are so captivating that some moments feel like you’re seeing live action actors. The best part is you’re involved. Every decision you make with each character affects how the people these androids are surrounded by react to you, therefore affecting the events that will transpire next.

Kara’s emotional bond with Alice pushes her to do things beyond her programming

There’s so much emotion that is effectively communicated through the combination of great camera work and fantastic acting. The game hooks you in as effectively as a TV series does and quickly makes you emotionally invested in the plight of the three main characters.

Markus administers medicine for his owner

What Fondaumiére repeatedly emphasized is how Detroit: Become Human is the player’s story, more than anyone else’s.

“Through gameplay, you’re going to ask yourself many questions, and it could change your attitude and how you decide. We give the player the possibility to tell his or her own story.”

Their role, he says, is to “show you the logical consequences.”

Connor is constantly in crime scenes caused by defiant androids

Fondaumiére hopes that after one playthrough, players go back and play again and really track how their initial decisions and the outcome that those produced affected how they played the rest of the game. He wants the players to be able to form their opinion on this potential reality so that when it comes — and he strongly believes that it will — we will all be ready.

Asked if he’s open to owning his own android, Fondaumiére set his answer up by saying how he’s a geek and is constantly fascinated by the advancement in technology, so in two words: “Why not,” adding that getting a few extra hours for himself because he can have someone else run his errands is an idea he can entertain.

Would you want to own an android?

Detroit: Become Human will be released on May 25, 2018. Pricing are as follows:

Standard Edition:

Philippines — PhP 2,799
Singapore — SG$ 72.90
Malaysia — MYR 229
Indonesia — IDR 729,000
Thailand — THB 1,890

Collector’s Edition: (Includes the full game, digital soundtrack, dynamic theme, and a physical art book)

Philippines — PhP 3,199
Singapore — SG$ 84.90
Malaysia — MYR 259
Indonesia — IDR 849,000
Thailand — THB 2,190

SEE ALSO: God of War: A must-play for 2018

Gaming

Playdate is a handheld gaming system with a crank

Yes, an actual crank

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If you’re bored of the current gaming console landscape or are simply waiting for the next-gen PlayStation to come out, there’s this new handheld system that might keep you a little busy.

From a company named Panic, which is known for developing the popular game Firewatch, comes the Playdate. It may seem like a simple gaming system at first, but look to its right and you’ll see its defining feature: a crank.


The developer says that some titles will use this analog controller exclusively, while some won’t at all (which, to me, sorta defeats the purpose of placing that game on this console). Everything will be played on its monochrome screen with no backlighting.

You can see it in action here:

The spin here is that the Playdate will come with a subscription of 12 games — delivered to you once a week for 12 weeks. It’s part of the initial cost of US$ 149, but there’s no word yet if there’ll be subscriptions after that and how much they’ll cost.

Each game will be a surprise, which may or not be a good thing. Spending this much on an unproven console — and possibly more for succeeding subscriptions — could end up becoming a costly risk.

Orders will be accepted later this year, while actual shipping will happen in early 2020. For now, you can sign up through the official website to receive updates on its progress.

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Gaming

Here’s an early look at the Sony PS5’s raw performance

Spoiler: It’s fast!

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Even though Sony dished out some early info on the upcoming PlayStation 5 (should they choose to stick to the numbered naming scheme) and revealed that it’s more than just a mere upgrade, we don’t have any tangible data on what exactly to expect.

Fortunately, Wall Street Journal tech reporter Takashi Mochizuki was present at Sony’s most recent gaming presentation and had this video to show us:


What you see here is a comparison between the loading times of the PS5 and PS4 Pro. Make no mistake here: The next-generation console is incredibly fast! A lot of credit must be given to the built-in SSD the PS5 will ship with.

This should be taken with a grain of salt, however. Tech demos are often fixed to make the newer (and more expensive) product seem superior. To the next-gen console’s credit, it’ll come with the latest eight-core Ryzen chip and a custom GPU from AMD’s Radeon Navi, which are capable of 8K gaming and ray tracing when put together.

Sadly, we still don’t have a release date and Sony won’t announce anything at E3 next month. For now, savor your PS4 and its growing library of classics.

Via: Kotaku

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Apps

Minecraft Earth is like Pokémon Go but with building blocks

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In a move that makes loads of sense, Minecraft is coming to mobile though an augmented reality app similar to Pokémon Go.

It’s called Minecraft Earth and it’s arriving later this year with a beta phase happening during summer. The developers offered this trailer, but it does little to explain how the system would work.


Check it out:

The official website’s FAQ section, however, delves into more of the info we actually care about.

For one, it’ll be free to play and will include several of Minecraft‘s traditional features including world building and discovering/fighting mobs.

Concerning regional availability, the developers aren’t confirming these details just yet. If it’s anything like the issues Niantic experienced with Pokémon Go before, chances are this rollout will be gradual, too.

Finally, for the “Will Minecraft Earth have loot boxes?” question, the website has a definite “No” to answer that.

Minecraft Earth will be available on both Android and iOS. Fingers crossed that there’ll be no delays. 🤞

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