Social Media

Facebook and Instagram are relaxing their nudity policy

Published

on

Among social media networks today, both Facebook and Instagram actively police and inhibit nudity on their respective platforms. Under current standards, users cannot post their nude bodies even for artistic purposes. However, because of a controversy with Black influencers, Facebook and Instagram are relaxing their nudity policy.

Back in August, Nyome Nicholas-William, a Black plus-sized model, posted an artistic photo of herself nude but covering her breasts with her arms. The photo promoted Nicholas-Williams’s self-love and celebration of her own body.

Spotting a potential infringement over their policy, Instagram moderators censored the photo and threatened to take down Nicholas-Williams’s account. The moderation resulted in heavy controversy from the influencer and her supporters, decrying selective censorship. Despite the moderation, white, skinnier models posted even more revealing shots of themselves without repercussions, they argued.

Now, because of the protest, Facebook and Instagram are changing their nudity policy starting this week (via The Guardian). The new policy will ease up on restrictions on breast squeezing, as depicted in Nicholas-Williams’s censored shoot.

At the time of the censoring, breast squeezing was regulated because “it can be most commonly associated with pornography,” according to Instagram. The platform enforces a stringent policy against nudity to reportedly protect users under the age of 13.

However, upon further reviewing today, Instagram admits the wrongful application of the ruling on the self-love shoot. Now, under the new policy, users can now post similar poses for artistic purposes. The company hopes that the new policy will ensure fair ruling across the platform regardless of race or body size.

SEE ALSO: What’s the safest way to have cybersex during quarantine?

News

Dozens of attorney generals ask Facebook to ditch Instagram Kids

But Facebook has other plans, obviously

Published

on

Facebook confirmed a few weeks ago that it’s working on a new project — Instagram Kids. Experts have warned that it could be a terrible idea, but Facebook has shown no interest in turning back.

Now, attorneys general from 44 states and territories of the US urged Facebook to abandon its plans to create an Instagram service for kids under 13. Citing detrimental health effects of social media on kids and Facebook’s murky past of protecting children on its platform.

The letter also noted that social media sites exploit users’ fear of missing out (FOMO) and can lead to body dissatisfaction and low self-esteem.

“Further, Facebook has historically failed to protect the welfare of children on its platforms. The attorneys general have an interest in protecting our youngest citizens, and Facebook’s plans to create a platform where kids under the age of 13 are encouraged to share content online is contrary to that interest,” the letter said.

The AGs also cited a UK study that found more cases of “sexual grooming on Instagram than any other platform” and noted that in 2020 Facebook and Instagram reported 20 million child sexual abuse images.

Facebook response

A Facebook spokesperson in response to the letter said, “We agree that any experience we develop must prioritize their safety and privacy, and we will consult with experts in child development, child safety, and mental health, and privacy advocates to inform it.”

In a nutshell, Facebook doesn’t get the fundamental fact that kids under the age of 13 don’t need to be on social media. The company defends its move by saying children often lie about their age and make an account on Instagram, where child-friendly features have limited reach. To prevent this, it’s creating Instagram kids to offer a safe and controlled environment exclusive for kids.

The spokesperson also noted that Facebook is a founding sponsor of a new Digital Wellness Lab at Boston Children’s Hospital better to understand the effect of digital technology on kids.

Continue Reading

News

realme India’s official Twitter was compromised, ran a crypto scam

Elon Musk is the new Nigerian Prince

Published

on

Crypto Scam

realme India’s official Twitter account was compromised for a short period on May 6, 2021. Scammers were able to control the verified brand account and change its name to Tesla, trying to mislead gullible users via a crypto scam.

After the Twitter account was taken over, the scammers replied to Elon Musk’s tweets and said they’re organizing an “airdrop” of 5000 bitcoins. The tweets pretended to be an official Tesla undertaking and suggested users sign up on obscure websites.

The account’s handle remained unchanged, but the Tesla name manipulated users to believe it’s true. The vulnerability was short-lived as realme India’s team soon took back control of the account, but they haven’t issued any clarifications or apology.

 

The modus operandi of these scams is quite simple — take over a verified account and rename it, share malicious or misleading links that claim to be a cryptocurrency giveaway, ask users to enter a raffle, or contribute a small token sum, and vanish with the monies.

Unsurprisingly, one of the mention domains contains a message from the Nigerian Prince-like Elon Musk, saying, “Our marketing department here at Tesla HQ came up with an idea: to hold a special giveaway event for all crypto fans out there.”

The scam asks users to contribute 1 BTC (bitcoin) to win back 10 BTC. It’s not supposed to make logical sense because it’s an outright scam. Twitter is filled to the brim with verified accounts that are compromised and used to cheat unsuspecting users. It isn’t known yet whether anyone fell for the crypto scam.

The boom in cryptocurrency as a decentralized and unregulated system is controversial. Lack of regulation and law enforcement makes it impossible to trace transactions, creating a haven for scam artists and the black market. While the growth of cryptocurrency is consistent, many experts still question its reliability and redressal mechanism in the real-world scenario.

Read Also: Basics of cryptocurrency: Risks and benefits

Continue Reading

Apps

TikTok, Reels clone YouTube Shorts launches in the US

Everyone wants a piece of the pie

Published

on

shorts

YouTube unveiled its short-video-making tool called Shorts last year, but it was in beta and limited to India. Shorts is now available to all creators in the US after testing them with select creators.

The initial release was quite hasty as it was supposed to bridge the vacuum left by TikTok’s ban in India. However, Instagram was much faster and well prepared to take on the challenge, dominating the turf over many local apps like Chingari, Roposo, and MX TakaTak.

YouTube is also adding a dedicated space in the bottom tab by replacing the explore button. In India, YouTube Shorts has a dedicated space on the top bar of the app. YouTube also displays Shorts in the home feed of the app after around 2-3 videos.

The goal is to incorporate a short video format in the existing app. While watching a “short”, users can tap on the music option to hear the full song via YouTube. Soon, the feature also will work the other way: From a YouTube music video, you will be able to click a “create” button right from the video to make your own Short.

Shorts will expand

The video platform’s music team has signed licensing agreements to use snippets of millions of songs from over 250 labels and publishers. It plans to expand Shorts to more markets later this year but it hasn’t specified which ones.

Ahead of the US launch, a bunch of new features has been added as well. There’s now an option to record 60-second clips in addition to the 15-second option. But users will not be able to add music from the YouTube library to 60-second Shorts. There are also new filters and effects in the YouTube Shorts camera.

In its most recent earnings report, YouTube confirmed that Shorts were generating 6.5 billion daily views, a substantial uptick over the 3.5 billion daily views that the feature was generating in late January.

Continue Reading

Trending