Enterprise

OPPO wants to build its own chipsets, hires talent from MediaTek

Also trying to tap Qualcomm and Huawei talent

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In the last few years, the US war against Huawei has ramped up considerably with no end in sight. However, though the crackdown was against only a few Chinese companies, other seemingly innocent companies have found themselves just as affected as Huawei. For one, American companies, like Google and Qualcomm, have to deal with the loss of a valued client. On the other side of the Pacific, other Chinese companies are also feeling the heat from Huawei’s troubles.

For example, OPPO has started developing its own processors in the wake of Huawei’s chip problem. Last year, the Chinese company filed a new trademark — named the OPPO M1 — through the European Union Intellectual Property Office, according to LetsGoDigital. Presumably, the new property corresponded to an upcoming in-house processor. However, the M1 has since faded into oblivion.

Today, according to Nikkei Asian Review, OPPO has not abandoned its processor project. In fact, the company has started ramping up its efforts for an in-house chip. “OPPO has been aggressively recruiting chip talent since last year as they realized that owning the chip design capability will give it more control over its supply chain,” Nikkei’s source said.

OPPO has reportedly acquired high-ranking executives from MediaTek including a former executive for Xiaomi. Further, the company has tried tapping developers from Qualcomm and Huawei’s HiSilicon.

Much like Huawei’s efforts, OPPO’s aggressive hiring aims to build a team for in-house development. Currently, OPPO still relies on third-party suppliers to build its phones like Qualcomm and MediaTek. With Huawei being attacked on all fronts, OPPO is in as much risk if the US implements a wider ban against Chinese companies. Recently, the US wants to take away Huawei’s ability to make its own in-house chips.

SEE ALSO: OPPO Reno4, Reno4 Pro specs and official renders leaked

Enterprise

Apple working on an in-house modem

Saying goodbye to Qualcomm

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In-house components are on the rise. Instead of relying on other component makers, a few brands have started creating their own parts for their devices. For example, Google recently launched the Pixel 6 series with its own Tensor chipset, the company’s first in-house processor. Apple is reportedly joining the bandwagon, potentially launching an in-house modem for future iPhones.

According to Nikkei, Apple is partnering with Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (or TSMC) for the latter’s 4-nanometer chip technology. With the partnership, Apple is on its way to building its own 5G modems for iPhones. Apple will also work on a battery management system built for the upcoming modem.

Prior to the announcement, Apple sourced its modems from Qualcomm. Ever since 5G became a ubiquitous feature, Qualcomm helped provide modems for most smartphones. Now, almost the entire market has 5G connectivity. The company has even stopped attaching the “5G” name to its chipsets with the assumption that every forthcoming product already has the feature attached.

Though Qualcomm is still a leader in the industry, numerous brands have already started ditching Qualcomm for their own components. As such, a huge chunk of the industry reduced their reliance on the semiconductor giant. For its part, Apple has already moved away from a lot of components, especially after its current chipsets.

SEE ALSO: Apple’s Self Service Repair will let you fix your broken iPhone on your own

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Enterprise

Samsung teases that sliding, rolling displays are coming

Officially teased

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Since the debut of the Galaxy Fold a few years ago, Samsung has dominated the foldable smartphone market with nary a competitor to hinder its success. Of course, folding screens aren’t the only ways to revolutionize display technology. Other brands, like LG, have developed sliding and rolling displays. Now, officially announced by the company, Samsung is officially trying its hand at other form factors.

Teased on their official site, Samsung Display has teased “a new era” with Samsung OLED. The company has released a few teaser images depicting a rollable and sliding display for the future. They will be called the Rollable Flex and the Slidable Flex, respectively.

However, though the form factor is officially coming now, Samsung has not announced where the new displays will launch. Though both are certainly staples of the television market, it’s within the realm of possibility that the new form factors will also come to Samsung’s smartphone lineup.

Back in May, Samsung patented the Z Rollable branding, potentially hinting at a future smartphone with the form factor. It might take a while for sliding and rolling displays to make their debut, though. Samsung still leads the foldable industry, but the market arguably hasn’t taken the industry by storm just yet, especially because of the form factor’s price tags.

SEE ALSO: Samsung launches 1000-inch TV display

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Qualcomm Snapdragon is getting a rebranding

It’s a new era for Snapdragon

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In terms of processors, Qualcomm Snapdragon is one of the most iconic barometers of a device’s capabilities. However, new followers of the smartphone industry might find it difficult to follow all the different numbering systems. Sensing the same difficulties, Qualcomm has announced that they are rebranding (and simplifying) the chipset series’ branding.

Officially announced by Qualcomm, the new era of Snapdragon is coming. For one, Snapdragon is officially dropping Qualcomm from its name. Instead of peddling its wares as Qualcomm Snapdragon 888, for example, the company’s chips will just be known as Snapdragon [insert number scheme here].

Speaking of its number scheme, the Snapdragon rebrand will also simplify the sometimes-arcane numbering system. Going forward, Qualcomm is trading in its triple-digit scheme for a single-digit one. The Snapdragon 888 (and its contemporaries) might end up being known as the Snapdragon 8 series now.

Finally, a small change that means all the difference: Snapdragon will no longer add in “5G” in the name of its future chipsets. When 5G was a novel feature, Qualcomm added “5G’ to its naming schemes to indicate that their products came with the feature. Now that 5G is ubiquitous now, Snapdragon will drop the scheme; instead, all future chipsets will come with the assumption that they are 5G-compatible.

However, despite Qualcomm’s announcement, we still don’t know how the new branding will look like exactly. We don’t have a concrete example yet. Qualcomm usually launches the next generation near the end of the year, so we might not have to wait long for an example.

SEE ALSO: Qualcomm promises zero carbon emissions by 2040

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