Pixel 4a iPhone SE Pixel 4a iPhone SE

Camera Shootouts

Pixel 4a vs iPhone SE (2020): Camera shootout

Battle of the small phones

Published

on

Now that we have the Pixel 4a in our hands, it’s time for another smackdown! Priced at US$ 349, we tested it against Apple’s US$ 399 iPhone SE that packs the powerful A13 Bionic Chip. With two compact phones sporting single rear cameras, which one will shoot better?

Make sure to jot down your answers, as the results of this blind test will be at the end of this article. As usual, photos were labeled, resized, and collaged (this time) for you to load the images faster. No post-processing nor any color adjustments were done in any of the photos. So, let’s begin!

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10

#11

#12

#13

#14

#15

#16

#17

#18

Results

Pixel 4a: 1A, 2A, 3B, 4B, 5A, 6B, 7B, 8B, 9A, 10A, 11A, 12B, 13A, 14A, 15B, 16B, 17A, 18B

iPhone SE: 1B, 2B, 3A, 4A, 5B, 6A, 7A, 8A, 9B, 10B, 11B, 12A, 13B, 14B, 15A, 16A, 17B, 18A

If you observe closely, the iPhone SE produced warmer yet vibrant photos and well-lit, wider portraits. During daylight, it provides more details while it gets pretty noisy in lowlight.

Meanwhile, the Pixel 4a captured cooler photos. Portrait-wise, it has better focus compared to the iPhone SE despite the cropping. But this affordable phone shines better with its HDR and Night Sight, doing a great job in lowlight!

At the end of the day, both phones took photos that are rich in colors and manageable highlights. They also have decent backlit shots and creamy depth-of-field which might appease smartphone photography enthusiasts. For US$ 399, we already have an impressive camera performance. There are no losers here.

 

 

 

 

SEE ALSO: Apple iPhone SE vs Google Pixel 4a: Head to Head

Camera Shootouts

Galaxy S21 Ultra vs Mi 11: Camera Shootout

Camera duel between 2021’s newest smartphones

Published

on

By

Just recently, Xiaomi launched the Mi 11 outside China. We quickly tested it against Samsung’s Galaxy S21 Ultra — which is one of the newest smartphone flagships around.

Again, this is a blind camera shootout with photos completely randomized. Someone in the comments section pointed it out and yes, it’s as clear as the sunny skies that this is like an examination where you have to jot don your picks on a piece of a paper (or through your notes app) and find out the answer at the latter part of the article.

As usual, no additional post-processing was done aside from compiling and resizing the photos. Let’s dive right into this camera battle!

HDR (High Dynamic Range)

Comparing shots taken with natural light may look easy, but it’s harder than it seems — especially if we compare each phone’s HDR capabilities.

#1 (Ultra-Wide)

#2 (Ultra-Wide)

#3 (Wide)

Auto White Balance (AWB)

Some sensors might be created equal but when it comes to AWB, there are phones that accurately depict the scene you see in real life — and some that take it too far.

#4 (Daylight)

#5 (Sunset)

Saturation

AI and computational photography either make or break a photo’s saturation level.

#6 (Wide)

#7 (Wide)

#8 (Zoom)

Zoom

This is to test the limits of Mi 11’s zoom capabilities with one telephoto lens against the Galaxy S21 Ultra’s telephoto pair.

#9 (3x Zoom)

#10 (10x Zoom)

Macro

Although there are no dedicated macro lenses for both smartphones, taking macro shots was possible thanks to zoom.

#11

#12

Food

There’s always a better food shot between two different phones — and it clearly shows.

#13 (Wide)

#14 (Zoom)

Night Mode

To test both phone’s camera prowess, these were taken in a scene without sufficient lighting other than the night city line.

#15 (Ultra-Wide)

#16 (Wide)

#17 (Zoom)

Faces

A comparison for people who shoot a lot of selfies and portraits.

#18 (Selfie Portrait Mode)

#19 (Portrait Mode)

#20 (Night Portrait Mode)

Results

Have you made your final photo picks? Check out the results below:

Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra:

1A / 2A / 3A / 4B / 5A

6A / 7A / 8A / 9A / 10B

11B / 12B / 13B / 14B / 15B

16A / 17B / 18B / 19A / 20A

Xiaomi Mi 11:

1B / 2B / 3B / 4A / 5B

6B / 7B / 8B / 9B / 10A

11A / 12A / 13A / 14A / 15A

16B / 17A / 18A / 19B / 20B

Conclusion

Even if we all have our preferences in choosing the best photo, the Galaxy S21 Ultra has proven its advantage in the smartphone camera department.

Other than the accurate White Balance detection, it’s also able to preserve the right amount of details, contrast, saturation, and even performs well under harsh daylight (HDR) or low-light scenarios. Not to mention, all lenses have wider Field of View (FoV) versus its competitor.

Its better AI processing and camera software algorithms also make better foreground and background segmentation. Producing creamier bokeh while being able to keep the details (even fine hair strands) intact.

Mi 11’s camera quality isn’t horrendous. Although it has AWB and autofocus inconsistencies, it was still able to keep up especially with shots taken by its main (wide) 108-megapixel sensor. While these two smartphones rock different sets of cameras including the 108-megapixel sensors (Galaxy S21 Ultra with ISOCELL HN3 / Mi 11 with ISOCELL Bright HMX), Xiaomi still delivered great and promising photos. For someone who wants to get a smartphone with great set of cameras at the fraction of the cost of the S21 Ultra, this is still a solid option.

SEE ALSO: Galaxy S21 Ultra vs Mi 10T Pro: Camera shootout | Xiaomi Mi 11 vs Mi 10T Pro: Camera shootout

Continue Reading

Camera Shootouts

Mi 11 vs Mi 10T Pro: Camera shootout

Similar camera system, different image quality?

Published

on

By

Mi 11 Mi 10T Pro

It’s been years ever since we did a head-to-head camera comparison between two Xiaomi smartphones — and those were the Mi 9T and Mi 9 SE . Leaping to 2021, we finally have a follow-up Xiaomi shootout with the newest Mi 11 together and last year’s Mi 10T Pro.

On paper, the Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro has a brighter 108-megapixel sensor with a f/1.7 aperture over Mi 11’s f/1.9 sensor. Regardless, does that bring any significant improvements over the older unit knowing they still ship with the same ol’ Samsung ISOCELL Bright HMX sensor?

If you’re down for some challenge, grab a pen and paper (or just open your notes app) and list down your best picks. This is a “blind test” for a reason so photos are completely shuffled. Sticking with GadgetMatch’s camera shootout standard over the years, these were taken and posted as they are without post-processing aside from collage and image resize.

Enough talking! Pick your best photos below.

HDR (High Dynamic Range)

There’s barely any difference in this camera shootout section.

#1 (Ultra-wide)

#2 (Ultra-wide)

Auto White Balance (AWB) and Saturation

The competition obviously starts here where each smartphone has their own way of processing photos — despite being under the same brand.

#3 (Wide)

#4 (Zoom)

#5 (Sunset / Ultra-wide)

#6 (Sunset / Wide)

Macro

Again, no dedicated macro lenses for both of these phones but their telephoto lenses managed to shoot close-up shots anyway.

#7

#8

Zoom

This is to test the limits of Xiaomi phones’ zoom capabilities with one telephoto lens.

#9 (2x Zoom)

#10 (10x Zoom)

Food

Which looks more appetizing in each shot?

#11 (Wide)

#12 (Zoom)

Night Mode

The biggest difference can be found here. Had the need to take more shots to show that there’s a difference between how these smartphones process night shots despite having the same camera system.

#13 (Ultra-wide)

#14 (Wide)

#15 (Zoom)

#16 (Zoom)

#17 (Wide)

Faces

For those who are curious to find out which is the best phone for taking selfies, bokehlicious portraits, and even thirst traps.

#18 (Selfie with Beauty Mode)

#19 (Selfie Portrait Mode)

#20 (Portait Mode)

Results

Are you convinced with your picks? Find out the final results below!

Xiaomi Mi 11:

1A / 2B / 3A / 4B / 5B

6A / 7B / 8B / 9A / 10B

11B / 12A / 13B / 14B / 15B

16A / 17A / 18A / 19B / 20B

Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro

1B / 2A / 3B / 4A / 5A

6B / 7A / 8A / 9B / 10A

11A / 12B / 13A / 14A / 15A

16B / 17B / 18B / 19A / 20A

Conclusion

Despite having the same 108-megapixel sensor (Samsung ISOCELL Bright HMX), the Mi 11 and Mi 10T Pro delivered varying image results (saturation, white balance, and contrast) due to different software camera processing and AI algorithm. The differences can be seen among colorful objects, greenery, skies, and even food.

While the Mi 10T Pro’s large f/1.7 aperture showed its true advantage in the night mode shots, most photos taken with the Mi 11 looked brighter under broad daylight. Other than that, the difference in the amount of Depth of Field (DoF) is barely noticeable — except for that portrait mode shot where the Mi 10T Pro looked like it just applied radial blur over the face. And while we’re on the topic, the Mi 11 takes wider selfies over the Mi 10T Pro.

If you’re considering camera alone, you wouldn’t go wrong with the Mi 10T Pro since it sells less than the Mi 11. But if you prefer those “vivid”-looking shots aside from Snapdragon 888, cleaner design, and lighter form factor, get the Mi 11 instead. If you’re looking for some serious camera smartphone (like the Galaxy S21 Ultra), you might just have to wait the Mi 11 Ultra that’s rumored to come sooner or later.

SEE ALSO: Galaxy S21 Ultra vs Mi 11: Camera shootout | Galaxy S21 Ultra vs Mi 10T Pro: Camera shootout 

Continue Reading

Camera Shootouts

Galaxy S21 Ultra vs Mi 10T Pro: Camera shootout

Two 108-megapixel sensors, two different price points

Published

on

By

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

It hasn’t been that long ever since we released our Galaxy S21 Ultra vs iPhone 12 Pro Max camera shootout. This time, we’re comparing Samsung’s Galaxy S21 Ultra to Xiaomi’s Mi 10T Pro, a cheaper counterpart that rocks an older 108-megapixel sensor. Other than their main sensors, they’re also both equipped with ultra-wide and zoom lenses. Of course, the sensors are also different.

Just like any other GadgetMatch camera shootout, the photos were taken straight out of the camera with no additional software post-processing other than resizing and compiling each for a collage for faster load times. While it was in New York last time, we’re bringing the streets of Makati and BGC to you in this comparison.

Do you think it’s possible for the Mi 10T Pro to go head-to-head with S21 Ultra’s monstrous cameras? Write your picks on a piece of paper to find out which is your best bet in this ultimate blind test! Don’t worry, we’re not gonna fool you this time as the photos are completely shuffled.

Outdoor

Comparing outdoor shots is harder than it seems — especially with the breakthrough in smartphone camera technology over the years.

#1 (Ultra-Wide)

#2 (Wide)

#3 (Wide)

#4 (Zoom)

 

#5 (Wide)

Indoor

The Galaxy S21 Ultra and Mi 10T Pro have different apertures in their wide and ultra-wide sensors (f/1.7 vs f/1.8 + f/2.2 vs f/2.4 respectively), but we’re still gonna take a look if the camera hardware is enough to bring out the best of a scene in each sensor.

#6 (Wide)

#7 (Ultra-Wide)

HDR (High Dynamic Range)

A must-have feature for cameras under broad daylight is the inclusion of HDR. We’re talking about how these smartphones show the right amount of exposure, highlights, shadows, and contrast in a single shot.

#8 (Ultra-Wide)

#9 (Wide)

#10 (UItra-Wide)

#11 (Wide)

Color and White Balance

While preferential, a more colorful and saturated shot doesn’t mean it’s the most accurate. This is also to test which phone has a better Auto White Balance (AWB) detection.

#12 (Wide)

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

#13 (Zoom)

#14 (5x zoom)

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

#15 (Wide)

Macro

This was achieved using zoom lenses of both smartphones to maximize the Depth of Field (DoF), or the amount of background blur in a photograph.

#16

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

#17

Food

Most smartphones suffer a lot in producing a detailed yet accurate food shot. This might be the boundary between these two phones.

#18 (Zoom)

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

#19 (Wide)

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

#20 (Zoom)

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

Low-Light

Another subject that sets smartphone cameras apart from each other is the ability to use Night Mode in low-light shots.

#21 (Wide)

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

#22 (Ultra-Wide)

#23 (Zoom)

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

BONUS: Selfie

Not the biggest selfie taker but I still tried considering how some people might like to see how the front cameras perform.

#24 (Night Mode)

#25 (Portrait Mode)

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

Results and Conclusion

As promised, this is a blind test where the sequence of photos were mixed. Can’t wait any longer? Well, here are the results:

Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra: 

1A / 2B / 3A / 4B / 5A

6A / 7B / 8A / 9A / 10B

11B / 12B / 13A / 14A / 15A

16B / 17B / 18B / 19B / 20A

21B / 22A / 23A / 24B / 25B

Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro:

1B / 2A / 3B / 4A / 5B

6B / 7A / 8B / 9B / 10A

11A / 12A / 13B / 14B / 15B

16A / 17A / 18A / 19A / 20B

21A / 22B / 23B / 24A / 25A

While there aren’t any immediately noticeable differences when using the 108-megapixel wide sensors of the Mi 10T Pro (Samsung ISOCELL Bright HMX) and the Galaxy S21 Ultra (Samsung ISOCELL HM3), the latter has a wider FoV (Field of View) when using the ultra-wide lens. Other than that, the Mi 10T Pro was able to keep up with the S21 Ultra in most scenarios and lighting conditions.

Where the Galaxy S21 Ultra shines the most is zooming in on subjects at a farther distance. That’s thanks to the inclusion of two telephoto zoom lenses. The S21 Ultra also produces better food shots, as well as photos in low-light with Night Mode turned on. The problem with the Mi 10T Pro is its horrible radial blur when getting closer to subjects. Food shots also look blander compared to what I’ve seen in person. Its software-based Night Mode just boosts the highlights of a photo — making it look “brighter” and less closer to reality.

S21 Ultra Mi 10T Pro

Meanwhile, software issues in most Samsung smartphone cameras are still present when using the Galaxy S21 Ultra — and those are over-saturation and over-sharpening. Most shots, while they produce a better overall “look”, doesn’t mean it’s the most accurate. I still have to commend its better Auto White Balance (AWB) technique over the Mi 10T Pro.

Lastly, I love how both cameras were able to preserve details on my face with little to no smudging at all. Still, selfie quality is based on the user’s liking. While I wasn’t able to test it out because we still need social distancing, both phones have ultra-wide selfie mode for wider groufies.

Author’s Opinion

While I get the part that most of these photos will be posted mostly for social media consumption (where the original image quality is compressed), this camera comparison proves that smartphone cameras, regardless of one’s price tag, have improved over the years both in hardware and software.

In this modern age, it has come to a point where you just take the phone out of your pocket, open the camera app, just point it at a distance, press the shutter button, and let the power of AI and software processing do the magic for you — all under fifteen to thirty seconds.

As a multimedia creative, I’m keen-eyed when it comes to shooting and judging photographs. With all the great feats of smartphone photography, this test is also one among the many reasons why smartphones still won’t be enough to replace DSLRs and mirrorless cameras — no matter how expensive they are.

While most inconsistencies in highlights, shadows, contrast, saturation, and White Balance can be corrected through apps like Adobe Lightroom, VSCO, or Snapseed, there are no tools to fix camera software mishaps like over-sharpening, blown-out HDR, focusing issues, blur, and even grain.

If you’re getting serious with photography, it’s no-brainer to buy a cheaper, beginner camera over an expensive smartphone. While the ability of 100x “Space Zoom” is a great feature, it’s still not as usable as the telephoto lenses you get in bigger camera gear. But if we’re just talking about casual photography, with three different types of lenses within the reach of your pocket, smartphones nowadays can do all of that at once. Samsung’s Galaxy S21 Ultra and Xiaomi’s Mi 10T Pro both prove that.

SEE ALSO: Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra review: The best among the beasts? | Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro review: By two different Pro users

Continue Reading

Trending