Apps

Does Pokémon Go break your data plan?

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If you’re invested at all in Pokémon Go, server status is of penultimate importance.

No servers, no pokémon. It’s that simple. Pokémon Go is just one of those gamesalways-on and always connected to the Internet. But how much data is it actually consuming?

Not a lot, surprisingly. Based on our own informal tests, the game consumes about an average of 10MB and more per hour. That’s not a lot.

A more scientific approach yields similar results. In an article published by The Wall Street Journal, network analytics firm P3 Communications said the app only uses between 5 and 10 MB of data per hour.

At this rate, you’ll need to play Pokémon Go continuously for more than 4 days to hit a theoretical 1GB data cap. The same study found that users average about 13 minutes per day, and at that rate, the average user consumes about 80MB a month.

pokemon-go-data-usage-20160720

Which should somewhat ease your concerns around Pokémon Go data usage.

Again, not that you should be worried at all. But at least one savvy mobile carrier, quick to jump on the Pokémon craze, is now offering subscribers unlimited Pokémon Go data plans.

U.S. carrier T-Mobile is offering its users a full year of free Pokémon Go data usage. T-Mobile customers just need to sign up for the T-Mobile Tuesdays app between July 19 and August 9, 2016 to claim the deal, after which all your Pokémon Go data consumption won’t count against your data plan.

It remains to be seen if we will see similar offerings in Asia, if and when the game launches as expected by the end of this month. Our sources tell us there is a high probability that some local telcos will follow suit.

Now, if only those servers would hold up.

[irp posts=”10698″ name=”Pokémon Generation 2 is out”]

Apps

The best apps in the App Store this 2020

According to Apple

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It’s that time of the year! Apple finally presented its App Store Best of 2020 winners. The technology giant recognized 15 apps and games that contributed to making life easier, healthier, and more connected this year.

Best Apps of 2020

iPhone App of the Year: Wakeout!, developed by Andres Canella

iPad App of the Year: Zoom

Mac App of the Year: Fantastical, developed by Flexibits

Apple TV App of the Year: Disney+

Apple Watch App of the Year: Endel

Best Games of 2020

iPhone Game of the Year: “Genshin Impact,” from miHoYo

iPad Game of the Year: “Legends of Runeterra,” from Riot Games

Mac Game of the Year: “Disco Elysium,” from ZA/UM

Apple TV Game of the Year: “Dandara Trials of Fear,” from Raw Fury

Apple Arcade Game of the Year: “Sneaky Sasquatch,” from RAC7

App Trends of 2020

App Trend of the Year: Shine, for helping users practice self-care.

App Trend of the Year: Caribu, for connecting families to loved ones.

App Trend of the Year: “Pokémon GO,” for reinventing the way we play, from Niantic.

App Trend of the Year: ShareTheMeal, for helping users make a difference.

App Trend of the Year: Explain Everything Whiteboard, for helping bring remote classrooms to life.

App Store Best of 2020 award

To celebrate these 15 apps, Apple had its designers bring meticulous craftsmanship, creating the first-ever physical App Store Best of 2020 award. It was inspired by the signature blue App Store icon.

Committing to its sustainability mission, each award reveals the App Store logo set into 100 percent recycled Aluminium, with the winner’s name engraved on the other side.

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Apps

Enterprise giant Salesforce acquires Slack for $27.7 billion

Salesforce’s biggest purchase in the 21st century

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Business software pioneer Salesforce is buying work-chatting service Slack for US$ 27.7 billion. The acquisition of Slack is being hailed as Salesforce’s biggest purchase in the 21st century.

Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff has said that together the two companies will shape the future of enterprise software. Salesforce has a robust unified platform for businesses to connect with their employees, customers, and partners, making it a perfect match for Slack.

The deal comes as the communication platform struggles to fully capitalize on the Coronavirus pandemic. With remote working becoming the new norm, the demand for enterprise communication apps has skyrocketed.

It faces a lot of competition from Microsoft Teams, which is deeply connected with Office and Outlook. Even Facebook and Google joined the race. However, their solutions lacked deep integration with other enterprise modules.

Slack was founded as a gaming company in 2009 in Canada but it soon emerged as the widely used workplace messaging app. It focused on real-time communication, giving teams the option to rely on an instant messaging app over email.

Details of the sale

According to the acquisition terms, Slack shareholders will receive US$ 26.79 in cash and 0.0776 shares of Salesforce common stock for each Slack share or US$ 45.5 per share based on Salesforce’s closing price on Tuesday.

Salesforce was the first company in the world to widely adopt the SaaS (Software as a Service) model, and it has worked wonders. The company was also among the first to leverage the cloud computing trend. It designed its entire systems around a decentralized hub that can be accessed remotely from any device, anywhere.

If the deal goes through as planned, Salesforce hopes to control Slack sometime from May to July 2021.

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Microsoft could bring Android support to Windows in 2021

Feeling the heat from Apple’s move to ARM

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Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system is widely used globally and has remained the laptop and PC segment’s undisputed leader. However, Linux, as well as macOS, have gained considerable traction in the last few years. To maintain its edge, Microsoft could bring Android support to Windows soon.

According to a Windows Central report, internal discussions are ongoing over the possibility of bringing Android runtime to Windows 10. Currently, you can install a third-party emulation software like Bluestacks to run Android apps on a Windows device. But the experience is far from perfect and still requires a bit of a learning curve.

Apple has a significant lead in this regard because its move to an ARM-based M1 processor allows it to run iOS apps on macOS seamlessly. This ideally helps in bridging the software gap between two very different devices.

Microsoft has tried to achieve a similar goal with the Universal Windows Platform. But the results are still limited because there are barely any devices with a smaller form factor leveraging the operating system.

More importantly, Microsoft wants to bring Android apps to its Microsoft Store. While there’s no information on how it intends to achieve this, the report does say the release is expected by Fall 2021.

Microsoft no stranger to cross-platform apps

Microsoft has whole-heartedly adopted cross-platform compatibility and has a host of apps on iOS as well as Android. If it’s able to bring Android apps to Windows, it’ll challenge the status quo of Chromebooks, which has long been a pain for the Redmond giant in the affordable segment.

This isn’t the first time a company is trying to incorporate Android within its proprietary operating system. BlackBerry 10 supported Android runtime, and the brand leaned on it to make apps easily available. While the move was too late for BlackBerry, it isn’t the same for Microsoft.

It’s worth noting that the idea is in a very nascent stage right now. We don’t know how Microsoft intends to distribute Android apps or whether it’ll start supporting Google Play Services. Although one thing’s for clear — Microsoft is feeling the heat from Apple.

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