Enterprise

Samsung’s phones are sending information to a Chinese company

But it’s not all bad, according to Samsung

Published

on

More than a week into 2020, the Chinese cybersecurity issue still proliferates. Today, the target is Samsung. A few days ago, Reddit presented a comprehensive thread on a concerning issue involving all Samsung smartphones.

Apparently, Samsung’s utility app — called Device Care — obtains one of its features from “a super shady Chinese data-mining/antivirus company called Qihoo 360.” As the name suggests, Qihoo 360 provides the app’s storage scanner. Further, as with most utility apps, Device Care is a mandatory, pre-installed app; you couldn’t delete it, even if you wanted to.

Allegedly, the antivirus provider has a less-than-stellar reputation, even in its own home turf. Among other things, it peddles obnoxious adware and actively hunts down other antivirus software in a device. Similarly, it has also been implicated in spyware cases in the past — including a controversy wherein the company sends user data to the Chinese government.

More than just Chinese fear, the Reddit user also tested the app for any communication with outside servers. Surprisingly enough, Device Care does establish communication with several Chinese servers. Unfortunately, the thread does not detail what information was transferred in the process.

Regardless, the information was enough to spark discussion especially among Western users who remain wary about Chinese involvement in their technology.

However, according to a statement from Samsung Members Korea, Device Care sends only information regarding suspected junk files to Qihoo 360. The app merely cross-references its information with Qihoo 360’s databases to confirm whether a file should be deleted or not.

Additionally, in a statement addressed to The Verge, the sent data includes only generic information such as phone model and OS version. “The storage optimization process, including the scanning and removal of junk files, is fully managed by Samsung’s device care solution,” the statement said.

Put simply, there’s nothing to be worried about. Unfortunately, Samsung’s statement will not quell the world’s fears against Chinese technology. Currently, China’s technology sector is still waging a defensive war against all front all over the world.

SEE ALSO: Samsung copies Apple’s logos for CES keynote

Enterprise

Samsung is selling the Galaxy Z Flip’s screen to competitors

Despite all the negative criticism

Published

on

Do you believe in the power of foldable smartphones? Today’s biggest foldable phone makers want you to buy into the new technology — whether it’s the pioneering Galaxy Fold or the refreshed Motorola razr. However, as you might have seen recently, foldable technology is still miles away from perfection. Touted as the next revolution of smartphones, the flexible display still suffers issues in durability.

Despite all that, Samsung is cashing in all its chips on the imperfect technology. Announced today, the South Korean tech giant is selling its new technology — dubbed as Ultra-Thin Glass (or UTG) — to competitors. The patented technology is up for grabs to anyone willing to pay Samsung for it.

The company is selling the display under the tagline “Tough, yet Tender.” The branding alludes to the 30μm panel that supposedly goes beyond the capabilities of last year’s model — at least, according to Samsung.

Currently, the UTG is still exclusive to the Galaxy Z Flip — which is getting some flak of its own. It will likely make its way to other Samsung devices in the future as well.

Unfortunately, Samsung has not confirmed any willing customers at the moment. However, the company is also enjoying a modicum of market leadership, owing to its early adoption (and development) of the technology. With the sale announcement, they can capitalize on other companies’ desires to build their own foldable phone.

Regardless, foldable technology is still an imperfect art. Though the Galaxy Z Flip allegedly sold out already, the device’s reception is up in the air. Who knows where foldable technology will fare in the future?

SEE ALSO: Samsung’s customer service offerings you might not know about

Continue Reading

Enterprise

Samsung’s customer service offerings you might not know about

Remote support, 24/7 live chat and more

Published

on

One thing you must always consider when buying an electronic device is the scope of warranty and support reliability. Most manufacturers fail in either one, but poor support reliability is a more common issue. Having reliable manufacturer support for your device is critical especially that devices inevitably break down in time.

Samsung recognizes the merits of having reliable support for its devices. As such, it launched three support mechanism where its consumers can choose from when their devices need troubleshooting.

Remote Service

Samsung consumers who bought handheld devices, TVs, and digital appliances can avail of remote support services for help and troubleshooting. By accessing the support app on their devices, consumers can place a secure call to the customer service team. A dedicated team of engineers can then remotely view and control specific device settings, and provide product assistance.

Live Chat

Consumers can also access the live chat feature available on Samsung’s website. This feature is also available through the Samsung Members’ app, which can be downloaded on the Google Play Store. Having a live chat enables consumers to ask the customer service anytime, anywhere. This is handy especially when a Samsung appliance breaks down, and there are no nearby technicians or service centers available.

After-sales services

Apart from offering convenient remote service and a 24/7 live chat, Samsung also offers a variety of after-sales services for the consumer’s peace of mind. These various services make cumbersome troubleshooting a thing of the past and give consumers a sense of security when buying a Samsung device or appliance.

  • Nationwide service network — Samsung has over 150 authorized service branches where they can bring small appliances (40 inches and below) for troubleshooting with dedicated technicians.
  • In-home service — Consumers with bigger appliances can schedule a home visit from dedicated technicians.
  • Support hotline — Those opting to call Samsung’s hotline may do so by dialing #GALAXY or #425299 for mobile devices. For appliances, they can call the toll-free hotline 1-800-10-7267864 (PLDT) or 1-800-8-7267864 (Globe).
  • Online manuals — Samsung also has online tutorials and FAQs for its devices. They are readily available on Samsung’s website or through the Samsung Members’ app.

With a variety of support services available to consumers, Samsung is ensuring its consumers that the company is ready to help them especially when an inevitable breakdown occurs.

Continue Reading

Enterprise

Apple: Coronavirus might cause iPhone shortage

Won’t meet expected revenue by March

Published

on

If, during a tense situation, someone say that they are doing okay, there is a slight chance that things are going the opposite way. Today’s coronavirus epidemic, for example, has affected the tech industry more than it has proclaimed. For the most part, China-dependent companies — like Apple — have waved off any adverse effect caused by the rampant virus, despite taking precautions.

Unfortunately for them, deception can only last so long. Recently, Apple has released its quarterly guidance report for investors. Compared to the general populace, investors require utmost transparency. As such, Apple revealed the potential setbacks heading into the second month of the coronavirus situation in China.

Mainly, Apple doesn’t “expect to meet the revenue guidance” expected by March. Both supply and demand are falling especially in China.

On the supply side, Apple’s Chinese manufacturers are reeling from the forced closures enacted both by the Chinese New Year holiday and the coronavirus safety protocols. For now, the factories are remaining open (or have since re-opened). Regardless, Apple is working together with the factories to ensure worker safety. Because of the shifted focus, iPhone supplies will temporarily decrease and will likewise “temporarily affect revenues worldwide.”

On the demand side, Apple is mulling over the closures of their retail stores in affected Chinese regions. Naturally, without a retail store, maintaining adequate supply is useless. To Apple’s fortune, these closures are affecting only Chinese customers. Regardless, China is an important market for the iPhone maker.

As consumers outside China, we won’t likely feel Apple’s pains on the demand side. However, a shift in supply — even a tiny one — will ripple across the globe either through launch delays or delivery shortages. If you’re an Apple fan, you might want to hang on to your old iPhone a bit longer.

SEE ALSO: Apple starts the year with a bang in their latest revenue report

Continue Reading

Trending