Social Media

Twitter starts rolling out more emoji reactions

It’s an experiment for now

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Twitter has a tried-and-tested palette of engagement options. Users can retweet, comment, or like tweets on the platform. However, the company has teased more emoji reactions coming to the platform soon. That time has finally come. Twitter is officially testing an additional set of emoji reactions for the platform.

Twitter is rolling out the new emojis in Turkey first for a limited time. The heart icon — or the platform’s like button — will have four additional options added: 😂, 🤔, 👏 and 😢. As such, Twitter users in Turkey can tailor their engagement with posts even better.

Notably, the new palette of reactions doesn’t really include a negative reaction. Despite adding a plethora of new features, Twitter is steering clear from facilitating negativity on the platform. The company even added a “dislike” button but doesn’t want to refer to it as a dislike button. In the same vein, the new emoji reactions don’t direct any negative emotion against anyone.

However, though the new feature adds a lot of flavor for Twitter, the experiment is still just that: an experiment set for a limited time. The company is still testing whether users will warmly accept the new reactions with open arms or not use it entirely. If the experiment is successful, the company has confirmed that it might expand the feature for other territories.

SEE ALSO: Twitter Communities will rival Facebook Groups

Security

Facebook will force at-risk users to use two-factor authentication

As part of its Protect program

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Compromised accounts are now a part of our daily lives. Every week, more and more of our personal accounts get involved in potential attacks. As such, several platforms always encourage us to change our passwords especially when the account is involved in a massive breach. Now, with more security options available to us, sites can encourage us to do much more. Reflecting this, Facebook will soon force potentially compromised accounts to implement two-factor authentication.

The platform’s Protect program detects individuals in a higher risk of having their account compromised. It can help activists, politicians, celebrities, journalists, and public figures to save their accounts before attacks happen. As part of that program, Facebook will start forcing members of the program to implement the additional safety feature as soon as possible. The new policy will start rolling out all over the world in the coming months.

Two-factor authentication involves using an authentication app — like Google’s Authenticator — to access the app right after inputting the account’s password. Nowadays, a password is already an inadequate way to protect an account. Though the program will force compromised accounts to use the security feature, it is still recommended for everyone to use two-factor authentication to protect their accounts.

SEE ALSO: Facebook terminates Facial Recognition from platform

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Social Media

Twitter users can now report photos posted without their permission

Reserved for private users

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Privacy is an important issue in today’s online world. People are now more aware about their data online. To reflect the shifting zeitgeist, social media networks have started issuing stricter guidelines when it comes to sharing and obtaining information. Twitter, at the forefront of a privacy-induced revolution, has introduced a new feature to help keep everyone safe online.

Starting today, private Twitter users can report photos of themselves posted by other people without their permission. As the official blog post indicates, “there are growing concerns about the misuse of media and information that is not available elsewhere online as a tool to harass, intimidate, and reveal the identities of individuals.” Though Twitter has always clamped down on sensitive information, such as those used to doxx individuals, the new policy now covers media including photos and videos.

The new policy only covers private individuals and information. As such, the platform will still allow photos of public figures and those used for public discourse. Since Twitter allows for some leeway, the platform’s moderators will still evaluate filed complaints on a case-to-case basis.

Interesting enough, Twitter quickly implemented the feature right after the company’s founder Jack Dorsey stepped down from his position as CEO and chairman. If this is any indication of the company’s future trajectory, it’s a step in the right direction.

SEE ALSO: Jack Dorsey steps down as Twitter CEO

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News

Jack Dorsey steps down as Twitter CEO

Successors named

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Twitter’s Jack Dorsey has been as much of a staple for the social media network as Mark Zuckerberg has for Facebook. However, as followers of Apple and Microsoft can attest to, long-standing figureheads of tech can change in an instant. Twitter is suddenly undergoing just that sort of shakeup. In a surprise announcement, Dorsey has announced that he is stepping down as Twitter CEO.

On-brand for his eccentric personality, Dorsey tweeted out the internal email detailing his resignation from his post. According to the email, Dorsey now feels that it is time to transition the company from a “founder-led” system to something potentially greater. He, along with other members of the board, has already appointed successors for his position.

First, now-former Twitter CTO Parag Agrawal will serve as the company’s CEO effective immediately. Agarwal was formerly an engineer with Twitter but has since led the company through several key decisions beside Dorsey.

Secondly, Bret Taylor, a member of Twitter’s board, will eventually serve as the new chairman. Dorsey will still serve the rest of this term until around May. Between now and the end of his term, Dorsey will help both new leaders transition into their new positions.

Though Dorsey’s announcement has a sense of intensity, this isn’t the first time that the Twitter founder exited his position. Back in 2008, he left his post for a time before returning to helm the company again in 2015. Only time will tell whether this current resignation will stick and what role he will transition into now. Regardless, it’s a new era for Twitter.

SEE ALSO: Twitter rolls out soft block feature for everyone

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