Gaming

Acer Predator Triton 700 Review

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If you want the biggest, baddest gaming laptop in existence, you go for the Predator 21 X. But what if you want something that actually fits in your backpack, and doesn’t compromise performance? Well…

There are multiple answers to that, and like the smartphones we recommend (or not) on a daily basis, there’s no solid solution when it comes to gaming notebooks. It takes a short look at the options from Acer alone to see how much variety there is now.

The Predator Helios 300 is such a well-balanced machine and popular among reviewers everywhere; the Nitro 5 is a fun gaming laptop, oblivious to the bling found in every other device mentioned here, but far more affordable; and, it goes without saying that the Predator 17 X is somewhere between practical (like the two aforementioned laptops) and overbearing (Predator 21 X).

And then there’s the Predator Triton 700 — the specialized name simply adds to its “Frost Forged” aura. This is the no-compromise, high-powered, impressively slim gaming device you want. Of course, it’s going to cost you a pretty penny, but there’s good reason for that.

Before we begin, here was our first look at the product back in April:

Not much has changed since then; the Triton 700 is still the same beast we experienced before, but now we’ve had our hands on it much longer, and got a far better idea of where it stands.

See for yourself:

It looks like an ordinary laptop at first…

15.6-inch 1080p IPS LCD, 18.9mm thinness, and 2.6kg in weight

But the RGB keyboard is fully mechanical and customizable…

The key travel is really short, but there’s a solid click to every press

The smooth glass trackpad is found above the keyboard…

The Gorilla Glass window provides a view of the AeroBlade 3D cooling system

There’s a desktop-grade GeForce GTX 1080 found inside…

You just lose the palm rest in exchange for the unusual design

And there’s no shortage of ports

Full-size USB and audio ports on the left

Power button, USB-C (with Thunderbolt 3), another full-size USB, and Ethernet port on the right

And desktop-size DisplayPort, HDMI, and power connector at the back

What does the Triton 700 pack inside?

With a starting price of US$ 3,000 — you read that right — the Triton 700 instantly falls under the elite class of gaming products.

While the Predator 21 X costs thrice as much, this is still as hefty in value as it is in specs. Let me explain why:

Despite the relatively thin (and sort of light) frame, there’s an Intel Core i7-7700HQ processor with a legit NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 8GB sitting inside. Combined with 32GB of memory plus two 512GB PCIe NVMe SSD drives in RAID 0 for a total of 1TB of storage in our review unit, the Triton 700 doesn’t hold back in terms of performance.

To maximize the potential of this laptop, a 120Hz panel is used alongside G-Sync technology to prevent tearing and stuttering during gameplay. This is perfect for fast-action games such as first-person shooters, and simply gives the high-powered innards justice.

Making all this possible is NVIDIA’s Max-Q design, which is the magic behind the no-compromise setup. And to ensure everything stays cool, Acer has their own tech called AeroBlade 3D — a set of ultra-thin metal fans that are good enough to prevent the need for any liquid cooling.

Can it run any game on Ultra settings?

There’s clearly no doubt that the Triton 700 can slay the latest games on their highest settings, but the questions are: How fast can it output frames, and at what temperatures?

We got a score of 86.8fps on Rise of the Tomb Raider‘s benchmark test with all settings at maximum on 1080p. That doesn’t hit the 100+ FPS we were hoping for out of a two-year-old game, but there’s virtually no lag during actual gameplay. Newer, lighter games such as PUBG, DOOM, and Overwatch are walks in the park for the Triton 700, just as they should. We also achieved 3,559 points with an average of 26.6fps on Unigine’s Superposition benchmark at 1080p Extreme settings.

As for temperatures, it’s a mixed bag. Maybe we’re spoiled by the more complex cooling systems of desktop builds, but the AeroBlade 3D fans didn’t always impress. During stress tests at maximum load (comprising graphics benchmarks), the processor would hit temperatures exceeding 85 degrees Celsius, while the graphics chip hovered close to 80 degrees.

It’s possible that a standard system temperature of 35 to 40 degrees prevents the fans from cooling the components any further, but they do get quite loud when you push the laptop and they reach 4000rpm. Although Predator Sense software offers overclocking for the graphics chip, the gains of around 3fps to 5fps for games aren’t enough to justify the spikes in temperature of 88 and 82 degrees for the CPU and GPU, respectively.

What are the drawbacks?

After all the gaming laptops we’ve reviewed, it’s safe to say that battery life is never a strong suit of these mobile machines, but I’m still obliged to mention that the Triton 700’s juice gets sucked dry quickly whether you’re playing games on battery power or simply browsing the web. Expect no more than two hours of usage on a single charge with moderate load.

As much as I love the inclusion of a mechanical keyboard and its clicky feel, the low travel on the Triton 700’s keyboard almost negates the advtanges. You see, the keys used on dedicated keyboards are tall and provide consistent feedback for each actuation; the Triton 700’s keyboard still feels close to the membrane type found on regular laptops, so don’t expect too much. (Being able to customize the colors and how they pulse is glorious, though.)

Above the keyboard, we have that awkwardly placed glass trackpad. The positioning is questionable, but that’s what enables the Triton 700 to have a full-length keyboard and enough room to house the high-end components underneath. Because it’s so smooth and far away from your hands, you’ll miss inputs like crazy in the beginning, and even once you get used to it, you’ll still swear to bring a separate mouse with you wherever you go. And before you ask: No, this should not be used for gaming!

Finally, the strength and placement of the stereo speakers don’t match the quality you get out of the display. There’s a glaring lack of bass, and you’re prone to covering the speakers accidentally while gaming. Like the need for a mouse to ignore using the trackpad, you’re better off ditching the top-mounted speakers completely for a pair of decent headphones.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

We’ve been hearing the words “no compromise” thrown around more times than we can count when it comes to gaming laptops. The Predator Triton 700 has, no doubt, packed so much power into such a sexy design, but there are a few trade-offs — like with any other gaming product.

For one, the audio and input experience had to take a step back in order to accommodate all the internal muscle. And unfortunately, the Max-Q design still needs some work before technologies like the AeroBlade 3D metal fans can reach their full potential. I wouldn’t overclock a laptop like this just yet.

in the end, the Triton 700 is still that gaming notebook you really, really want, but have to think twice before purchasing. At US$ 3,000 for the lowest configuration, this isn’t an easy buy, though we can’t blame you for wanting one of the best.

We love the super-smooth performance, incredibly slim and light profile, and design that resonates with elite gaming products. The Triton 700 sets the standard for how all gaming laptops should look and feel like in the future.

SEE ALSO: Acer Predator Orion 9000 First Look

[irp posts=”19307″ name=”Acer Predator Orion 9000 First Look”]

Gaming

FarmVille is shutting down

Ending this year

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Whether you were an avid virtual farmer or not, you’ve heard of FarmVille. After its launch in 2009, the in-browser Facebook game’s popularity grew to astronomical proportions, earning fans from all demographics. Likewise, it sparked a renewed market for more in-browser, micromanagement games. However, after 11 years of success on the platform, the original FarmVille is shutting down.

Zynga, the game’s developers, announced the shutdown through FarmVille’s official support forums. The game will officially stop operating after December 31, 2020.

The shutdown stems from Adobe’s own termination of Flash. Several years ago, Adobe announced the official end date for its Flash plug-in — 2020. The announcement was a death knell for all Flash-based games and applications including FarmVille. Facebook similarly announced that they will stop supporting the game after the cutoff date.

In the meantime, FarmVille in-app purchases will remain open until November 17. After which, the game will shut down transactions. If you still happen to have a farm in the game, you must use any remaining credits by December 31. No one can play the original FarmVille after December 31.

Of course, Zynga still hasn’t abandoned the FarmVille franchise just yet. FarmVille 2: Tropic Escape is still playable after the December 31 cutoff. Likewise, Zynga is launching FarmVille 3 on mobile soon. (Alternatively, you can also go for Stardew Valley, one of the best farming simulators out there.)

Still, if you were one of the countless players whiling away the time on FarmVille’s virtual farms, you might want to log in a few more hours before the original classic finally rides away into the sunset this year.

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Computers

Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD review: Cheap yet superb

A Singaporean brand that deserves more attention

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Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD

Admit it, the pandemic is making us buy things we don’t need. At the same time, we also bought essentials to boost our productivity when working inside our rooms. In the past few months, a lot of us went under a WFH (work from home) setup — which also meant greater demands for consumer tech products such as laptops, PC rigs, keyboards, mouse, and even monitors.

As GadgetMatch’s Associate Creative Producer, I needed a large monitor that’s not too pricey yet delivers the top three features that I need: color accuracy, viewing angles, fast refresh rate.

After lending some of my time for thorough online shopping, comparing, and research, I went with Armaggeddon’s Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD monitor.

Armaggeddon may not be familiar to most of you. They’re a Singaporean brand that offers a wide array of computing products and gaming peripherals.

Ultra slim and bezel-less

What I first liked about Armaggeddon’s Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD is its design. The massive 23.8-inch display almost feels like it’s floating because of the zero bezel design or what they call the “Infinity Frame”. Other monitors of the same price look bland with their plastic black frame and stand.

Armaggeddon’s logo may not be as distinct from afar but the silver emblem is a nice complement to the monitor’s brushed metal bottom bezel.

Its sides are truly ultra thin. The only thick part is at the bottom, which houses the monitor’s internals and holds the hefty metal monitor stand in place. Side-tilting isn’t supported but it can be tilted upwards or downwards at around +15/-5-degrees.

To make it more reliable, this monitor also supports a 75×75 VESA mount for better desk setups.

Ports and cables

You get the usual port selections here. Out of the box, there’s an included 12V cable that powers the monitor through the DC port.

There’s also a bundled HDMI cable that you can connect via the HDMI port. This port is used for PC rigs, Playstation or Xbox consoles, and laptops that support it. There’s even an extra VGA port for older PC and laptops configurations with less fancy resolution output.

What you don’t get is a DisplayPort (DP) and an Optical Audio Output — which might be a dealbreaker for some of you. There’s also no room for USB-C port since having one would add more to its cost. For my part, I just use a Bluetooth speaker for loud music sessions or a pair of wireless earbuds when I’m editing.

Cable management is a little tricky though as it doesn’t include clips for fixing those cluttered cables behind the monitor.

Real IPS panel

Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD

There are different types of monitors out there that are being sold around the same price. You may have heard of them before: TN and VA panels are the most common in the list. They’re cost-efficient especially because they feature less bright and desaturated panels. But what made me choose the Armaggeddon PF24HD is the inclusion of a real IPS panel.

Just like in your smartphones, IPS displays offer excellent colors, contrast, and viewing angles. These are display features I’ve said from the very beginning that I need for the type of work I do.

Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD

Yes. I’m still not over Ko Mun Yeong and Moon Gang Tae

For what its worth, the display is excellent. Colors pop while there’s little to no degradation when you look at the monitor even at the narrowest viewing angle. Other advertised “IPS” monitors I found online were just re-configured TN/VA panels with poor viewing angles and color accuracy. It’s not a good thing to fool customers with product misinformation.

With my desk setup facing parallel to the window, screen glare is unavoidable. But with PF24HD’s bright panel, it wasn’t that big of a deal for me. I even adjusted the monitor’s brightness from 70 down to just 40 because it’s just too bright for me.

In my case, my IPS panel doesn’t suffer from severe “backlight bleeding” that shows brighter areas near the edges among most IPS panels. A built-in Anti blue-light filter also comes handy to protect your eyes when using it.

True 75Hz refresh rate

During my time of comparing, I noticed that other popularly-branded IPS panels of the same price only feature a modest 60Hz refresh rate. Meanwhile, faster refresh rates of 75Hz and 144Hz are available but they feature TN or VA panels — which is a deal breaker for me (and if you were paying attention earlier, you already know why they’re not advisable for creative tasks).

Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD

Having Armaggeddon’s 75Hz IPS panel is a true feat. I first tried it on macOS Catalina and I haven’t experienced any hassle after connecting my MacBook through the HDMI port. It’s automatically set to the highest refresh rate available.

Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD

I was also able to run both of my MacBook Pro and eGPU through Windows 10 Bootcamp. Although this one is more of a complicated process before it actually detects and runs the external GPUs, the monitor detection together with its higher refresh rate setting worked for my case.

If you have a PC setup or a Windows laptop, I think you shouldn’t worry as your device will automatically detect the monitor through HDMI port.

Photo and video editing

Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD

The main reason why I bought an external monitor is to maximize my screen workspace. Even if my 15-inch MacBook Pro displays a higher resolution while this 24-inch monitor only supports 1080p Full HD, it significantly improved my workflow when editing our YouTube videos through the latest update of Final Cut Pro. That added space for color correction, transition, and effects tab as well as the inspector and nearby windows really helped me work faster.

Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD

Other than that, I was able to post-process these shots for my Nike Air Max 720 review with ease. This is where color accuracy comes into play. Armaggeddon PF24HD’s IPS panel together with its 100% sRGB support helped in displaying the shot’s correct color information.

To maximize the monitor’s contrast ratio, I then changed the screen calibration. On macOS, I adjusted it through System Preferences > Displays > Color and set it to Apple RGB profile to show deeper grays and blacks and better red hues as well.

If that’s not enough, there’s also a contrast adjustment setting through the monitor’s native menu accessible via its joystick at the back.

Gaming

Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD

Gaming on a Mac was possible thanks to this fast 75Hz monitor. As said a while ago, I was able to run the MacBook Pro and eGPU configuration through Windows 10 Bootcamp drive. That gave me the ability to play GTA V (Grand Theft Auto V) at high graphics settings without any stutters and lags.

The monitor’s 75Hz monitor also worked like a charm. Having an AMD Radeon graphics card helped a lot especially because the monitor features AMD Freesync without the need for a DisplayPort.

Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD

“Why is he playing Call of Duty: Mobile with such gaming setup?” — well, I know what you’re thinking. By installing GameLoop, I was able to test out CoDM with max graphics settings available. I know it’s a smartphone game but trust me, running it on a large 75Hz monitor is a feast for the eyes.

Its 5ms response time might not be as responsive as other 1/2ms-rated monitors but it’s ultra responsive especially when aiming and hitting opponents in the game.

A lot of users are hyping up curved monitors for a “greater” playing experience, but I oppose. The flat display with a 178-degree viewing angle still does the job of keeping you immersed when playing.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

In a sea full of well-known monitor brands, it’s hard to tell which relatively unknown brand delivers a better display quality at a reasonable price. Armaggeddon, being Singapore-based, gave me a huge assurance and relief. Not that I don’t support Chinese products but it’s hard to rely on products with negative reviews about false advertisements.

I’ve been using this monitor for more than a month now and it’s definitely worth your hard-earned money. If you’re like me who’s a creative that needs a reliable 75Hz IPS monitor on a budget, this is definitely one of, if not the, best options out there.

If you’re someone who’s planning to build a gaming setup with a limited budget on peripherals, this is also a great purchase especially with its fast refresh rate and response time.

In Singapore, you can buy the Armaggeddon Pixxel+ Pro PF24HD with a discounted price of just SG$ 169 that comes with a free BT150 soundbar. If you live in the Philippines, it’s being sold for just PhP 5,990 through a local distributor‘s Shopee page.

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Gaming

NBA 2K21 review: Fading glory of basketball

Apart from a few fixes, it doesn’t try to reinvent anything

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As of writing, we’re still in the midst of the NBA Playoffs taking place in Orlando, Florida. As the NBA turned to a quarantine bubble setup, the game just doesn’t feel the same. Fortunately, this time of the year — as weird as 2020 has gone — brings one constant thing to NBA fans alike. That’s right, a new NBA 2K video game!

NBA 2K21 comes around with almost the exact same flavor as its predecessor. It’s still the same kind of sports simulation that mirrors pre-pandemic NBA basketball. The live crowds, the clutch plays, and the jaw-dropping moments — it’s the same full NBA experience. But is this version of the game worth even looking at, now?

Is there anything new to look forward to?

Rodneil: There really wasn’t anything that’s remarkably new that was announced leading up to the game. It’s a little disappointing. But that may also be because 2K has already done everything it can do on the PS4/PS4 Pro platform?

Gab: I personally had zero expectations coming into the game. I got to play the demo a little bit and I got a glimpse of some of the changes — like the shot meter. Also, that demo pretty much jinxed the NBA Finals by putting the Bucks and Clippers in it. But again, it’s still the same NBA 2K game as before.

What made NBA 2K21 stand out from last year?

Gab: In my opinion, they didn’t do much to make this version stand out in any way. It’s still the same core experience as the previous two games. However, they tweaked the Pro Stick a little bit to add more fluidity to certain actions done in-game. And of course, there’s the change in the shooting controls when using the Pro Stick.

Rodneil: Some face scans and overall character models for players in the all-time and classic teams also look better. Previously, they looked like “lite” versions of players models in current teams, but no longer seems to be the case. 

That said, some classic teams are in desperate need of more real players. If all 2K has rights to are just five players from that classic team, that isn’t much of a team. Either they put more thought into the generic players or they just scrap the team altogether and just add them when they have at least 8 players from that team. 

What about the game modes? Are they any different from before?

Rodneil: I only really spend most of my time on three game modes: Quick Play, MyCareer, MyLeague/MyGM. For MyLeague/MyGM, I mostly customize the experience to my liking. Since I grew up looking up to players that entered the league around the 90s to 2000s, I would usually load user-created rosters and relive a particular NBA season. 

I’m not sure if there are enough players like me, but I think a good addition would be a “What if” or “Legacy” option in MyLeague. What it will do is let you relive a particular season and make your own trades. 

Of course, I understand the challenges of getting the rights to all the players but perhaps what 2K can do is highlight user-created rosters that can be used for each mode but have the year change from 2020-201 to whatever season you’re trying to relive. 

Gab: Apart from the usual Quick Play and MyCareer, I do play MyTeam from time to time. Even in the previous versions, I always found myself going through this game mode to take a break from getting triple-doubles in MyCareer. I honestly felt that this time around, there’s actually an incentive to keep playing.

The usual roster of mini game modes and weekly challenges are there, which also ultimately test your game skill. This time, they even included a whole progression-type of reward system like how most shooter games have battle passes. Essentially, you earn XP to level up and earn rewards as you reach certain levels.

This is honestly a great addition to MyTeam as a whole. Before, I felt like there’s really nothing much you could do in it when you’ve finished the challenges. With this added feature of a progression-style reward system, I get to explore more of MyTeam.

Speaking of MyCareer, how did NBA 2K21 handle it?

Gab: MyCareer this time around was disappointing, at best. Last year, they did an entire college stretch, and it just felt like it wasn’t worth the wait. While I applaud going all the way back into a high school root, it just made the tedious part even more so.

For starters, I don’t know if it’s pretty common to switch sports in your senior year of high school. But somehow, that’s how this story begins: with Junior switching to high school basketball at the wake of his dad, Duke’s death. It doesn’t necessarily add anything new to the MyCareer experience, and instead makes the campaign longer.

Rodneil: The whole prep-to-pro thing just feels really out of place now. Plus your player during that period just doesn’t feel like it’s worth playing.

I want a story that chronicles an NBA journey, not some forced narrative about who I am as a player.  It’s called MyCareer but every year it just keeps feeling like the story doesn’t match the game mode. 

After all of that, is this still worth playing?

NBA 2K21 serves the obvious mixed bag of great basketball with roughly the same mix of game modes to boot. The action, player movement, and dynamic player moments is still top-notch. And while questionable decisions were made to the core gameplay, it’s still a joy to play even when you’re just passing time.

If you were getting into NBA 2K21 with a lot of expectations, I assure you that you will be disappointed, at best. An extended MyCareer storyline, coupled with not-so-stacked Classic teams for Quick Play don’t seem to incentivize you to maximize the game. While MyTeam actually gets some shine, I was sort of hoping every other game mode did too.

In the end, you will still consider getting this game, and possibly go for the Mamba Edition if you’re dead set on the PlayStation 5. If you still love playing the game of basketball from the comfort of your home, it will surely bring you that. 

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