Her GadgetMatch

LG Pra.L’s Galvanic Ion Booster makes your skincare products more effective

Makes your visits to the facial clinic less frequent

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The marriage of beauty and tech is not an entirely new thing. Ionic products, tools that are supposed to help slow down the signs of ageing, even water bottles that will supposedly make water better for your skin — they have been around for a while. LG’s new, Pra.L line is one of the most recent launches which was met with both shock and awe. This is mainly due to the new claims of what their high-grade devices can do but also because of the price tag they come with.

I personally love this whole movement. In the advent of the informed consumer trend, more and more people are becoming concerned about what they put on their skin. It’s highly common now that women who are into skincare are vigorously discussing ingredients. A lot of us are also becoming more interested in the details of what aestheticians are doing for us.

The entire Pra.L line is practically a beauty clinic within the convenience of your own home. It is democratizing the technology of some of the most common, non-invasive treatments and making it accessible to consumers who want to do things on their own.

One of the notable devices in the line is the Galvanic Ion Booster. The idea of an ion booster to help skincare products penetrate deeper into the skin is not entirely new. LG’s version of the device, however, is definitely a cut above most of the products in the market.

As someone with sensitive skin which is on a recovery period from hormonal breakouts, I tend to be quite picky with anything I put on my skin. It has also been recommended that I go for simpler routines using as few products as possible. With little product, you’d want them to be as effective as possible. This is where this device comes in.

Ease of use

For the past month, I’ve been using the Galvanic Ion Booster religiously — morning and night. I would use the cleansing mode with my CeraVe Hydrating Facial Cleanser (green bottle, for normal to dry skin). The device literally tells you which part of your face you should be using it on. The voice is not too loud but perky enough to get you out of your own head. Just in case you get too in the zone. Using galvanic ion technology, the device helps the cleanser draw out the impurities in your pores. Expect a slight vibration that is more relaxing than uncomfortable.

For the boost mode, I either use it with a vitamin C serum or The Ordinary’s Alpha Arbutin 2% + HA. Both serums are helpful in brightening the skin and fading out the marks left behind by intense breakouts. For the boost mode, the same technology is applied but in a reverse direction, helping the product and its ingredients penetrate your skin deeper. The boost mode is something I enjoy a lot as you can actually feel your products getting absorbed right away. I top everything with a gentle moisturizer from La Roche-Posay and on days when it’s extremely dry outside, a face oil from Australian indie beauty brand Ipsum.

I also use it with retinol treatments once a week but would make sure I double up on sunscreen the next day. The heat and vibration from the device do render retinol to be more effective. However, it will also make your skin more susceptible to sun damage.

When a stubborn pimple decides to pop up unannounced, I also use the boost mode to help my Mamonde AC Balance Spot Serum be absorbed faster. I wake up the next day with the little bugger dry and ready to be forgotten in the next couple of days.

Worth the price tag?

The device’s triangular head is made out of medical-grade titanium, making it safe for use on your skin. The shape is also effective in reaching the small nooks around your face like the sides of your nose. I just make sure to clean the device with running water and wipe it dry before putting on the cover.

LG’s Galvanic Ion Booster also has a good weight to it without being too heavy. The device also travels well — it comes with its own carrying pouch — and can charge with a micro USB cable or through the charging dock it comes with. The sleek design of the device makes it an easy hold and a joy to use. This, despite having to move it around your face for about three minutes per mode. Sounds like a short time but not when you’re a busy, working woman. I found it to be a lesson in slowing down and just making sure I enjoy doing my skincare routine instead of rushing through it like a chore — a form of self-love if you will.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

After a month of use, my skin feels more plump and healthy. It’s also brighter and blemishes became more manageable. I can highly recommend this for the skincare junkie; It’s a game-changer.

The device retails for SG$ 529 which might seem like a huge blow to the wallet. However, prevention is definitely less expensive than cure so think of it as an investment for the future.

Her GadgetMatch

Short hair? Here are three fun hairstyles using the Dyson AirWrap

Different yet easy!

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These days, a lot of us spend more time at home. With a lot of free time at hand, why not practice serving looks that you’d want to do when things go back to normal? If you’ve always wanted to have beautifully-styled tresses for events, the office, and even casual get-togethers, we got you. Using the Dyson AirWrap, we’ll show you three different styles that you can do throughout a regular week.

The Dyson AirWrap is available online for EUR 489 for the complete set. Installment plans start at EUR 20,79 per month.

Special thanks to Hotel Bristol Berlin for the venue
Makeup by Mel Montajes

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Apps

9 new Memoji stickers and what they mean in the time of coronavirus

There’s an appropriate Memoji for the guy who ghosted you 💁🏻

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Now more than ever, most of our communication has gone virtual. Identifying and expressing how we feel at a time like this can be difficult, especially when everything is exclusively done via messaging.

With the new iOS 13.4 update, you get 9 additional Memoji stickers that you can use to react to the different messages you’re sending and receiving in the time of coronavirus.

1. Person behind a computer

Person behind a computer is the new work from home symbol. Wear it (send it) like a badge of honor — you are, after all, doing humanity a favor by staying home.

2. Huffing with anger

Huffing with anger is how we react when we learn that other people are not self-isolating, not practicing social distancing, or not taking the necessary precautions to keep themselves and their community safe and healthy.

3. Person with tipping hand

Person with tipping hand is the humble brag Memoji. Send it right after the photo of the sumptuous meal you made for yourself, when you’ve had a productive day, or when you feel proud of finally doing spring cleaning!

4. Gesturing no

Gesturing no is the only correct response when you get THE text. You know, that message from the guy who ghosted you but suddenly remembered to respond 10 months later because, well, he’s probably alone, bored, and is *hopefully* in quarantine like everyone else.

5. Smiling face with three hearts

Smiling face with three hearts is the Memoji your friends, family, and of course, your crush deserve to receive when they check up on you and wish you well.

6. Party horn

Party horn is what you should send when you and your friends finally agree to do a virtual date — whether that’s a Netflix party, happy hour, or a book club. Express your excitement about hanging out, albeit via FaceTime, with the proper Memoji.

7. Rolling eyes

Rolling eyes is appropriate when we see insensitive things posted on social media, or when we get a text from the toxic ex.

8. Screaming in fear

Screaming in fear is a cute way to express that panic you’re feeling during situations like not being able to buy rice from the supermarket, or when your friend comes up with horrendous ideas like cutting her own bangs!

9. Folded hands

Folded hands is what we attach to messages of good news at a time like this, no matter how shallow they may be. Alternatively, it’s also an appropriate Memoji to send when you’re feeling zen after a virtual yoga or meditation session.

It will be a while before we get a new set of Memoji stickers, but here’s to hoping we get the face mask one 😷 really soon!

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Features

Her story: Shyama Golden

On childhood memories and creating work that make people more involved

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Shyama Golden is a visual artist from Brooklyn, New York. She was born in Texas, but also lived in New Zealand and Sri Lanka, where her family is originally from. These influences didn’t start coming out in her work until she became more distanced from them. “Sometimes you have to be taken out of an environment to realize what was special about it,” she notes.

The huge painting in her living room called Road Trip was inspired by both her Sri Lankan background and growing up in Texas. Central to the painting is a yakka, a demon character in Sri Lankan folklore that performs exorcism rituals to cure people of their ailments. Shyama says the rituals are something that people have been doing for thousands of years, although they are much less common now — almost like a dying art. In a way, she hopes to resurrect that through the piece.

Shyama draws inspiration everywhere — from distant sources, to forgotten artists, to old books, to obscure references — but so much of her work also reflects her own childhood memories.

“Sometimes you have to be taken out of an environment to realize what was special about it.”

Catsquatch is a collaboration between her and her husband. She did a large painting for it, but it’s also a children’s storybook that they wrote together — a story of house cats running away from home, yearning independence.

Her memory of seeing stray cats wandering everywhere while living in Sri Lanka is also evident in a portrait of the younger versions of her mom and her aunt.

The most notable facet of her body of work, however, isn’t their size or the presence of felines, but the number of digital portraits of women of color she’s drawn over the years.

From flat, minimalist digital work as a graphic designer, having the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil has allowed her to create work that still looks like an oil painting but at a much faster pace.

“What the iPad did is allow me to keep my style. It was really helpful to me because over two years I was able to output what used to take me 5-6 years,” says Shyama.

Among the portraits that she’s done, her favorite is the one of Indian author and activist Arundhati Roy for The Atlantic. She says she liked working on it because it tells a story within the portrait, “beyond just the face, it actually has a whole narrative to it.”

She also uses the iPad to do studies and mockups of what she intends to be a physical work. Initially drawn on Procreate using its symmetry feature, The Feminine Mirage uses a custom panel and a mirror to convey myths perpetuated by different social constructs. Although extremely challenging and time-consuming, she enjoys working on pieces that have a presence in the physical world but are still interactive as they make people more involved.

Her story: Shyama Golden

Shyama Golden is a visual artist whose memories of growing up in Texas and Sri Lanka are evident influences in a number of paintings that she's done. Most notable of her body of work, however, are theportraits of women of color she's drawn over the years using the iPad Pro and the Apple Pencil. This is her story.

Posted by Her GadgetMatch on Friday, 27 March 2020


Her story is a series featuring women we admire from a wide array of cultures and industries — women who excel and work hard at honing their craft by using the tools and technology they have at their disposal. They tell stories of their journey through life, their influences and dreams, their unique experiences, and how they navigate the modern world.

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