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Motorola announces Moto G6, G6 Play, and G6 Plus with 18:9 displays, Android Oreo

The latest midrange phones to beat

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Meet the new Moto G6 family, Motorola’s latest trio of midrange smartphones. Each comes with its own strengths, but they have a number of similarities.

Each G6 phone has Android 8.0 Oreo out of the box with no skin on top, a display with an 18:9 aspect ratio, front LED flash, water-repellent coating, and fingerprint reader. They also share a common design that’s starting to get old since every Motorola phone has had the same shape.


Moto G6

The regular Moto G6 comes with a 5.7-inch Full HD+ display and Snapdragon 450 processor which easily puts it in the same league as lower-midrange phones. It’ll have up to 4GB of memory and 64GB of storage. There’s a microSD card slot just in case you need more space.

A dual rear setup is onboard with a 12- and 5-megapixel combo and bright f/1.8 lens. It records video up to 1080p at 60 frames per second. An 8-megapixel front camera takes care of selfie needs.

With a 3000mAh battery and 15W TurboCharger bundled in the box, you can quickly charge the phone and it’ll last (most likely) the whole day.

It uses Gorilla Glass 3 for both of its front and back with similar curves we first saw on the Moto X4. The same goes for the G6 Plus variant.

Pricing starts at EUR 250.

Moto G6 Plus

The Moto G6 Plus gets the best features in the series. It has the biggest display with a 5.9-inch IPS LCD sporting a Full HD+ resolution. It also has a more powerful Snapdragon 630 processor with up to 6GB of memory and up to 128GB of expandable storage.

Camera-wise, the G6 Plus features dual rear cameras as well — a 12- and 5-megapixel combo with a large 1.4µm pixel size and f/1.7 aperture. It has Dual Pixel autofocus for quick focus times and support for 4K video recording. As for selfies, there’s an 8-megapixel front camera complete with beauty mode and filters.

The Plus model has a slightly larger battery than the regular variant with its 3200mAh capacity. Fast charging is also a feature of the Plus using the included 15W TurboPower charger and USB-C cable.

Pricing starts at EUR 300.

Moto G6 Play

Lastly, we have the G6 Play — the G6 phone with the biggest battery at 4000mAh packed into a body sporting a 5.7-inch display. Motorola claims it can last up to 36 hours on a single charge which is pretty impressive. The large battery phone is also bundled with a 15W TurboPower charger just like its siblings.

The Play version is all about longetivity, so its specifications are not the best in class but still capable. It’s powered by a Snapdragon 430 processor with 3GB of memory and 32GB of expandable storage.

There are no dual cameras here but the single 13-megapixel rear shooter should be enough for quick snaps, while the 8-megapixel selfie camera is on par with the more expensive models.

Its price is only EUR 200.

All of the new Moto G6 phones are going to be available in markets where Motorola is present, except for the Moto G6 Plus which will skip North America.

SEE ALSO: Motorola Moto X4 Review: Beautiful and fragile

India

India is banning the consumption of e-cigarettes

This includes flavored vapes

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E-cigarettes or vapes are considered to be a better alternative than actual cigarettes. Many active smokers have shifted to these electric pens and have been successful in overcoming their addiction. Countries around the world recognize the benefits of an e-cigarette, but India has a different opinion.

India has banned e-cigarettes amid growing fears over the health risks posed by vaping. The Union cabinet has made the manufacturing, import, sale, distribution, and advertisements of e-cigarettes a cognizable offence.


Justifying the ban, Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman said, “E-cigarettes were promoted as a way to get people out of their smoking habits but reports have shown that many people are not using it as a weaning mechanism but are rather addicted to it.”

E-cigarettes are the most common form of Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS). These are basically devices that do not burn or use tobacco leaves. Instead, they vaporise a solution using a battery. This vapour is then inhaled by the user.

The government said the decision to ban e-cigarettes is aimed at protecting the youth, the section that is most vulnerable to the health hazards of e-cigarettes. Though, India isn’t the only country to have concerns.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported six deaths due to unknown lung disease in the last few weeks. Governments have long considered a plan to regulate or limit the usage.

Justifying the ban, Sitharaman cited a US report that said e-cigarette sales have risen 77 percent because of consumption by students. Storage of e-cigarettes shall now be punishable with imprisonment of up to six months or a fine of up to INR 50,000 or both.

Obviously, following the announcement, tocks of cigarette makers ITC and Godfrey Phillips ended higher by 0.9 percent and 5.3 percent, respectively. Conventional tobacco-filled cigarettes are still legal in the country but heavily taxed. The government has repeatedly tried to make them more expensive to discourage consumption, but the plan never worked.

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Enterprise

Apple is trademarking the slofie

Is the slofie a thing now?

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“Selfie” will always be a part of our everyday lexicon. Even if you don’t like taking selfies, you still know what a selfie is. Since the invention of the front-facing camera, everyone has taken a selfie in one form or the other. Likewise, most people also know what a groufie is — the selfie’s group-oriented cousin. Both the selfie and the groufie have seemingly covered all the bases in the front-facing phenomenon. Besides, we have enough of these terms to last us a lifetime.

Apparently, Apple doesn’t think so. At its latest iPhone 11 launch event, the company introduced another monstrosity into our packed vocabulary — the slofie, a selfie but shot in slow motion. The slofie promotes Apple’s newest camera feature. The iPhone 11 Pro’s front-facing camera packs in a slow-motion shooting capability. The camera shoots at an astonishing 120 frames per second.


As with the Animoji years ago, Apple is going all-in on the slofie. The company has applied for a trademark on the term. The trademark application covers all software involved in shooting the slow-motion selfie. Basically, Apple wants to control the market when the iPhone 11 drops. If the slofie does gain traction, it will likely face competitors and imitators. (For example, the Animoji had its fair share of imitators.) A trademark can prevent that from happening.

In another vein, Apple is still trying to make slofies a thing. Apple, please don’t make slofies a thing.

SEE ALSO: The Apple Watch Series 5 is here!

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India

A government portal will let you find lost phones

Have you ever lost a phone?

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India is a very happening market for mobile phones right now. Every week we’ve seen a new phone launch in the country and every brand has flooded the markets with options. So far, there are no signs of a cooldown and a vast chunk of the population still hasn’t moved to a smartphone.

With hundreds of millions of phones around us, imagine how many phones would be lost every day. The government of India wants to make it easier for you to find a lost phone and is working on a new project.


Since 2017, the Department of Telecommunication (DoT) has been working on the Central Equipment Identity Register (CEIR), a database for storing IMEI numbers. International Mobile Equipment Identity (IMEI) is a 15-digit unique number that identifies mobile devices. India has over a billion wireless subscribers.

Every device with a SIM slot has an IMEI number. In case of a dual SIM phone, each tray has a separate number. These are used to establish a unique identity and help to trace phones via a wireless connection.

Telecom minister Ravi Shankar Prasad will launch the web portal to report a theft in Maharashtra on Friday. If your mobile phone is stolen or lost, you will have to file a police report and inform DoT via helpline number 14422.

After the police complaint, DoT will blacklist the IMEI number which would result in the handset being blocked from accessing any mobile network in the future. For now, the project is having a pilot run in the state of Maharashtra and will be opened up to the rest of the country soon.

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