Reviews

Motorola Moto X4 Review: Beautiful and fragile

This phone is just gorgeous!

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The upper midrange phone market has a new contender. Back when Motorola was still under Google, the Moto X was a flagship phone which focused more on actual features than beastly specs. Fast forward to 2017, we now have the fourth-generation Moto X4. It feels familiar but at the same time different.

Before we get to the deets, let’s run through the body of the phone.


It’s got a 5.2-inch Full HD display

It’s also super saturated by default

No dual front cameras, but it has a bright LED flash

Selfies in the dark!

Power button and volume rocker are on the right

Both are easily distinguishable

The bottom houses the USB-C and 3.5mm audio ports

The certification labels are also found here

The glass back’s reflection is gorgeous

Complete with a shiny and wavy light streak

The beautiful back is bothered by a tiny hole

Unusual spot to place a microphone

Currently the prettiest Motorola phone

It’s easy to say that the Moto X4 is Motorola’s prettiest phone so far, or maybe one of the prettiest since the Moto RAZR. The Moto X4 has a smooth and shiny glass finish (front and back), unlike other Motorola midrange phones like the Moto G5S Plus and Moto Z2 Play, which both have cold aluminum bodies. Its 5.2-inch Full HD display also makes the phone fairly compact despite having the usual amount of bezels all around.

We reviewed the Moto Z2 Play, and the Moto X4 surely wins in terms of one-handed usage thanks to its palm-friendly curves. While the glass back looks more pleasing, especially when light strikes it, the phone lacks Moto Mod support since there are no connector pins on the back. It could have been nice if Moto threw in wireless charging, but the glass is just for vanity.

What the Moto X4 has which other midrange phones don’t is waterproofing. Other Motorola handsets usually have minor protection against liquids with nano-coating, but this one is completely IP68-certified so you can take it to take pool and swim with it. Just the pool though, and not the beach.

Moto X series steps down to midrange power

One other thing to point out about the Moto X4 is its processing power. Moto fans (including me) were surprised that the X series came back to the market as a midranger. It looks like we’re not getting a true Motorola flagship this year that’s available across the globe. The shatter-resistant Moto Z2 Force is only in select regions, so we gotta wait for next year. Maybe an 18:9 phone soon?

Our unit has a Snapdragon 630 processor with 4GB of memory for multitasking and 64GB of internal storage. It’s a dual-SIM variant which has a hybrid slot for a microSD card just in case you need it. Despite not having the best processor around, the Moto X4 never lagged during usage. Prior to using the Moto X4 as my daily driver, I’ve been using the Moto Z2 Play (because of the useful Incipio battery Moto Mod) and both are on par in terms of performance. I kinda miss the AMOLED panel though, which is super useful for the Moto Active Display feature.

Since it’s a Motorola phone, you get a somewhat bare version of Android Nougat (no Oreo, yet). There are a few Microsoft apps pre-installed to get you started in doing mobile office. A midranger like the Moto X4 performs pretty well in gaming. Some titles can be played in high settings like Asphalt Extreme, but NBA 2K17 needs to be set somewhere in the middle if you want really smooth frames.

Wide-angle camera is always fun to use

Two is better than one, right? The Moto X4 has dual rear cameras and they’re similar to the likes of LG phones which have a super wide-angle secondary lens. We’re talking about a 12-megapixel f/2.0 primary camera with Dual Pixel autofocus and an 8-megapixel ultra wide-angle shooter without autofocus. While playing around with the super wide-angle lens, it felt like I had a smarter GoPro in my pocket. Selfies is also a thing for the Moto X4 with its 16-megapixel front-facing camera which has its own LED flash.

Quality-wise, the photos taken look great. Dual Pixel works like a charm when shooting in dim places and locks the focus onto the subject really quick. The wide-angle lens doesn’t have any focusing mechanism because it doesn’t really need one. Also, the phone has some sort of portrait shooting mode called Depth Enabled. It works okay if you like to have a creamy bokeh effect, but the camera launcher stutters a bit. The selfie mode doesn’t do justice to the high-resolution sensor, but there’s a beauty mode at least.

Battery lasts longer than expected

Equipped with a non-removable 3000mAh battery, the Moto X4 can last the whole day with moderate use. With a full charge, I start my day around eight in the morning and commute to work for an hour or two while I listen to Spotify or watch something on Netflix to keep myself sane while stuck in traffic. I switch between Wi-Fi and cellular data during work hours, and just before heading home, I have more than enough juice to once again brave the rush hour on the road. I average around four to five hours of screen-on time.

There’s Quick Charge 3.0 on board, and a compatible fast charger is included in the box. A zero to 25 percent charge takes only 15 minutes, while a full 100 percent charge takes about an hour and 15 minutes.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

After using the Moto X4 for more than a week, it crossed my mind that this phone battles its own cousin — the Moto Z2 Play. Both are similarly priced, but they offer something different from each other. For instance, the Moto X4 is waterproofed and sexy while the Moto Z2 Play is industrial-looking and has modular accessories available. Both are on par in performance and display quality (minus the true blacks of Z2 Play’s AMOLED), but their size difference is something one should consider, too.

Grab the Moto X4 if you want a packaged Motorola smartphone concealed within a beautiful glass body. The phone retails for PhP 23,999 in the Philippines and INR 22,999 in India for the same 4GB/64GB configuration. If you can, there’s an Android One version of the Moto X4 in the US which is available for US$ 325 under Google’s Project Fi network.

SEE ALSO: Moto G5s Plus Unboxing and Hands-on

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Reviews

Xiaomi Mi 9 SE Review: For those who like it small

A pocketable flagship-like phone

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Xiaomi‘s line of flagship phones for 2019 has been in the market for a few months now. The Mi 9 is indeed a smartphone that offers a great specs-to-price ratio; however, some users find high-end phones nowadays to be larger than usual. That includes the Mi 9 and the newly announced OnePlus 7 Pro.

We certainly miss the Compact models of the Xperia line, but it seems like Sony isn’t announcing anything new soon. Good thing  Xiaomi made its upper-midrange offering pocket-friendly — not just in price, but also in size.


This is the Mi 9 SE and it’s not as expensive as Xiaomi’s flagship models, but it’s also not that cheap. Aside from specs, the phone’s highlighted feature is its pocketable size.

It has a 5.97-inch Full HD+ AMOLED display

The panel is made by Samsung

There’s a tiny notch for the front camera

It’s not different from other notched displays

The dual nano-SIM card tray is on the left

There’s no space for a microSD card

The physical buttons are all on the right

The power and volume rocker blend well in the frame

The top has the IR blaster and secondary mic

The IR is a rare feature among phones

The bottom houses the loudspeaker and USB-C port

The main microphone is also at the bottom

The back is a flat slab of shiny glass

It’s so reflective, it’s like a mirror

The camera layout is similar to the Mi 9’s

Three cameras in one row

A pocketable all-display phone

The Mi 9 SE doesn’t look any different from its more expensive cousin. It also has an edge-to-edge display with a small notch on top to house a front-facing camera. The display measures just below six inches and it’s a Super AMOLED panel from Samsung. The screen’s resolution is at Full HD+ which is pretty sharp.

Since its an AMOLED, the color reproduction is top-notch and the blacks are indeed black. Beneath the display is a fingerprint scanner that lights up when needed. It takes less than a second to read, but it’s not the fastest I’ve tried. Thankfully, a smooth slab of Gorilla Glass 5 protects the display from unwanted scratches.

In the sea of sizable Android phones, the Mi 9 SE’s pocketable dimensions is welcoming. The phone’s display doesn’t look small and limiting because of its thin bezels. Once you get a hold of the phone, you’ll appreciate its size. It’s not as petite as former Xperia Compact models from Sony, although it’s fairly small by today’s standards.

The overall design of the Mi 9 SE isn’t special, but it doesn’t look and feel cheap either. The use of glass in the front and back elevates the phone’s premium touch, but I’m not a fan of its chrome-like side frame. Still, the Mi 9 SE is an attractive piece of hardware that can also act as a mirror with its uber-reflective rear glass.

Flagship-like performance in a smaller package

Powering the Mi 9 SE is the Snapdragon 712, a brand-new flagship-grade processor from Qualcomm. While the Snapdragon 712 is a new chip, it’s not that different from its predecessor which powers last year’s Mi 8 SE. The new processor is just slightly faster on paper, so the real-world difference is hardly noticeable. That means Mi 8 SE users can skip the Mi 9 SE if they are after a performance upgrade.

The phone runs MIUI 10 out of the box and it’s based on the latest Android 9 Pie. Xiaomi is good at keeping their devices updated, which is one of their strengths. With 6GB of memory to work with, the Mi 9 SE can handle multiple apps at the same time. So far, I haven’t encountered any lag during my time with the phone.

Moreover, MIUI 10 is one of the nicest skins for Android. The changes aren’t just cosmetic, they are also functional. The extra features from Xiaomi surely come in handy, especially the built-in system-wide dark mode.

When it comes to gaming, the Mi 9 SE can deliver high-quality graphics anytime. By default, most games are already set to high settings which means this phone is ready for mobile gamers. The screen does feel a bit small when compared to my previous devices, especially to my daily driver –the Huawei P30 Pro. My go-to games like Asphalt 9: Legends and PUBG Mobile run smoothly on the device.

Triple the sensors, triple the fun

The biggest upgrade of the Mi 9 SE is found in the camera department. From two cameras, the new model now has three: a regular, a telephoto, and an ultra wide-angle.

The primary shooter is a 48-megapixel camera with an f/1.8 aperture designed for everyday shooting. Paired with AI scene recognition, the Mi 9 SE’s main camera can take great stills in various lighting conditions.

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The second one is an 8-megapixel telephoto camera with 2x optical zoom. I personally don’t feel the need for a telephoto lens on a mobile phone, but it’s available for situations when you need to get closer to your subject. Take this ground signage as an example:

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What I enjoy using is the ultra wide-angle lens. The phone’s third camera, which has a 13-megapixel sensor, can take a different prospective. When taking a photo of landscape or any open space, the phone’s AI will suggest to also take a photo using the ultra wide-angle camera. The quality doesn’t match the main shooter, but it’s highly usable.

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As for selfies, there’s a 20-megapixel camera inside the display’s notch. Like with most front-facing cameras, it comes with beauty filers and artificial bokeh effects to mimic a high-quality portrait shot. For a front camera, it’s one of the sharpest and most detailed selfie shooters I’ve tried.

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With a total of four cameras, there are a lot of ways you can take photos (and also videos) with the Mi 9 SE. Having both an ultra wide-angle and telephoto lens is the perfect setup for a modern camera phone, especially within the phone’s price point.

Fast charging battery

Despite the relatively pocketable dimensions of the Mi 9 SE, it still has a respectable battery capacity at 3070mAh. The efficiency of the new Snapdragon processor and the battery-saving features of Android Pie-based MIUI 10 help the Mi 9 SE last long on the road.

The phone was able to last a full day with heavy use which includes consistent internet connection over Wi-Fi or LTE, push notifications, and some gaming on the side. On lighter days, I am able to get almost two days of battery life. My average screen-on-time is around three to five per charge.

When it’s time to charge the battery, the bundled fast charger fills up the Mi 9 SE from zero to 47 percent in just 30 minutes. A full charge takes an hour and a half.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

The Mi 9 SE unit I have for review retails for PhP 15,990 (6GB+64GB) at Authorized Mi Stores in the Philippines, which is roughly US$ 310 when converted. For that price, the phone already offers a lot. I can’t think of any new phone that matches the Mi 9 SE in terms of price and features, making it an easy recommendation for those looking to buy a new phone.

The phone doesn’t have any flaws (nothing major, at least) that’ll turn off potential buyers, including myself. Is the Mi 9 SE the perfect midrange phone existing today? I can’t say for sure, but it’s clearly the best you can get in its range.

SEE ALSO: Xiaomi unveils the Mi 9 SE Brown Bear Edition with custom case and themes

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Gaming

ASUS ROG Zephyrus S (GX701) review

Refinement of a modern classic

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A lot of credit has to be given to ASUS for pushing gaming laptop designs forward. Back in 2017, the original ROG Zephyrus paved the way for a new category of high-powered laptops that didn’t weigh a ton.

Since then, we’ve seen different variations of the Zephyrus that either upped the power or modified the original look. That evolution eventually led to the Zephyrus S (GX701) I’m currently reviewing.


With the some of the latest components and refinements based on previous generations, this Zephyrus already seems like a winner in my book. The question is: Does it have enough oomph to compete against the laptop brands that have caught up?

It all starts with the design

Once again, it’s the overall makeup that makes the Zephyrus S stand out. Every design cue was placed not just to make the magnesium-alloy body look sleek, but to improve airflow and cut as many grams as possible.

For one, ASUS managed to cram a 17.3-inch screen within a body normally reserved for 15-inch laptops. On top of that, its height tops out at 18.7mm and weighs about 2.7kg. That’s larger than what we’re used to from the Zephyrus line, but this beats every other high-end machine with equal specs.

Back as well is the Active Aerodynamic System (AAS) which lifts the bottom panel for more air intake. It sounds similar to ASUS’ ErgoLift on its ZenBooks, but the implementation here is more performance-centric, and unfortunately, not comfortable on a lap.

However, AAS is still the key to better cooling while staying slim. It’s complemented by two 12V fans and five sets of heatpipes to get as much heat away from the high-powered components. The only tradeoff is the awkwardly placed keyboard and trackpad; the former sits really low with no palm rest while the latter takes getting used to in its rightmost spot.

What I loved was the placement of the volume roller to the upper-left of the keyboard. It makes adjusting the two 2.5W speakers so easy. Pressing the roller mutes them. Less vital, but greatly appreciated, is how far the power button is from everything — safe from accidental touches.

To the side, we’re treated to two USB-C ports (one of which is capable of DisplayPort 1.4 and Power Delivery for charging), three USB-A, one HDMI 2.0, and a 3.5mm audio port. There’s no mention of Thunderbolt 3 which is a bummer at this price range.

The features we actually want

ASUS definitely went for the no-compromise approach when creating the Zephyrus S. On top of all the features mentioned above, the specs are a collection of the must-haves and great-to-haves in both gaming and content creation.

The screen in particular, while only 1080p in resolution, owns a refresh rate of 144Hz with a 3ms response time and NVIDIA’s G-Sync tech for smoother visuals. Even more interesting: the panel has a Pantone color certification for 100 percent sRGB coverage — ideal for creators who value color accuracy.

On the software side, Armoury Crate is a pleasantly comprehensive piece of software that allows you to monitor CPU and GPU frequencies, temperatures and voltages, and how much work the fans are putting in.

In addition, the program lets you change settings such as the RGB lighting of the keyboard and bundled mouse. But what makes the software so intuitive is that it can be accessed anytime by pressing the ROG button above the trackpad and monitored through a smartphone. I’ve always loathed non-stock Windows apps, but Armoury Crate is definitely an exception.

One more cool feature is the ability to charge the Zephyrus S using any PD-certified adapter or powerbank. Chances are you’ll always have its lightweight power supply on you, but for the few instances you don’t, this is a lifesaver considering how below-average the battery life is.

The one feature that’s missing is a built-in webcam. ASUS decided to leave it out in favor of slimmer bezels around the display. This might be a downer to some; at the same time, this opens the opportunity for folks to use an external webcam which would be far superior to the low-end cameras most laptops these days come with.

Performance you’d expect

It goes without saying that raw performance is what the Zephyrus S excels at most. From the Core i7-8750H and GeForce RTX 2080 Max-Q to the 24GB of RAM and 1TB M.2 PCIe storage, there’s no shortage of power in this machine.

Since the panel is of the 144Hz kind, you really feel these specs push the laptop to what it’s truly capable of. I’ve used gaming notebooks with a 4K display stuck at 60Hz, and I never felt that their high-end components were maximized to their full potential.

Personally, I find the 1080p resolution with a 144Hz refresh rate and G-Sync support to be the best-possible combination. After all, I honestly can’t tell the difference going any higher in pixel count on a 17.3-inch monitor. This is the sweet spot, and the Zeph nails it.

Here are a few benchmark numbers:

Shadow of the Tomb Raider: 95fps (1080p, Highest preset)

Unigine Superposition: 4858 (1080p Extreme)

Cinebench R15: 112.19fps (OpenGL), 1176cb (CPU)

Truth be told, the results only speak for a small portion of the big picture. Having an 8th-gen Core i7 chip and RTX 2080 (even if it’s a slightly slower Max-Q variant) should instantly signal that AAA game are no problem for this setup.

Even though we’re seeing silicon manufacturers pushing out newer, faster chipsets than ever before, rest assured the configuration we have here will run through games for years to come. We’ve reached a point wherein the next generation of games will stop being so demanding on hardware and instead focus on optimizing for current-gen processors.

On the downside, the battery life is lackluster as usual. When not plugged in to a wall socket, I’m lucky to get 2.5 hours out of this thing with a balanced workload consisting of web browsing and Photoshop usage. It’s expected out of any gaming laptop at this point and should be anticipated by any potential buyer.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

Even though gaming laptops are becoming increasingly common and more affordable in some cases, beasts like the Zephyrus S deserve the distinction of pushing the category to new heights. The model I reviewed here retails for PhP 199,995 or around US$ 3,835. It’s a heavy price to pay, but you’re getting top-notch hardware in return.

While this is certainly too much for mainstream users, creators and hardcore gamers will see the value in its top-notch components and attention to detail. ASUS has taken the Zephyrus line to yet another level, which is a major achievement considering how great the series had been to begin with.


The ASUS ROG Zephyrus S is available in ROG Megamall and ROG Concept Stores in the Philippines.

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Reviews

OPPO A5s Review: Is it really any different?

Bang for the buck, at a cost of key features

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Smartphone companies are trying to bring a premium experience to its consumers at an affordable price. Gone are the days when budget smartphones keep getting the lowest version of everything, all to meet the price point. Now, smartphones get better cameras, near full-screen displays, a faster charging port, and much more.

OPPO’s latest smartphone, the OPPO A5s, mixes the days of old with some new tricks. At its price point, this budget smartphone caters to anyone looking to own a smartphone for the first time. But with better options for the same price, you gotta wonder how different this phone is from the rest, and if it’s worth it.


Here’s a rundown of the phone’s key features:

It has a 6.2-inch display with a waterdrop notch

At the back, there is a dual-camera setup and fingerprint sensor

The bottom contains the micro-USB port and headphone jack

The overall performance gets a pass

The highest possible combination you could get is the 3GB+32GB option, with a 2GB+32GB config, as well. Performance-wise, you can’t really expect any quick response on ColorOS but it is responsive, nonetheless. Apps open quite seamlessly in my experience, but I also noticed the little spikes in load time when multitasking. This mostly happens when I try to switch to another active app.

Still, I don’t recommend opening too many apps. There’s little RAM available, and the phone’s OS takes up almost 40 percent of that. I do recommend getting the Lite versions of apps if you want to maximize the RAM.

One great feature I’m genuinely surprised this phone has is OPPO Game Space, which activates once you start up a game. Not a lot of budget smartphones have this kind of feature integrated into the system.

With the feature on, games such as Mobile Legends and Clash Royale load quickly, with no observable loss in graphic performance. Of course, with it on, battery life depletes relatively faster than just using the phone as is. While we’re on the subject…

The phone almost lasts a day thanks to its battery

The OPPO A5s has a 4230mAh battery, which lasts almost the entire day on a single charge. I mostly used the phone for social media purposes, watching YouTube videos, and a little bit of gaming. Of course, I had to turn Game Space off for the times I played games in between because it automatically turns on. The device tends to feel warm after just an hour and a half of use, even if I was in an air-conditioned room.

One full charge took close to two and a half hours, which is pretty decent considering it still uses a micro-USB port instead of a USB-C. Although, I really wished they switched to USB-C, since other companies are starting to roll that out for their budget lineups. Charging time would be a bit faster, especially for a phone with that big of a battery.

The cameras are confusing to me

OPPO is more commonly known to people as a selfie phone brand. So obviously, even if this was a budget smartphone, I was expecting the cameras on this device to be satisfactory, at best. Until I got to use both cameras, and got a mixed bag of results.

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The dual-rear camera setup was great, but not overwhelmingly fantastic. Don’t let the iPhone-looking interface distract you; the 13-megapixel sensor takes fairly decent photos for a budget smartphone. Shots at night, under ample lighting, are decent in terms of color and detail.

If you really value details on your photos, keep the HDR setting on the whole time and prepare a microSD card. I would have wanted more modes, like Pro Mode since other companies are doing it with the same camera setup.

As for the front camera, I’m a little disappointed. I get it: it’s just an 8-megapixel sensor so I really shouldn’t expect much. But if you’re someone on a budget and likes taking selfies, you would be a little disappointed in the image quality this front camera has.

No amount of AI beautification settings could compensate for how washed the images look at times, especially with group shots. I guess if you had to sacrifice one thing, it was this camera.

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Other design features worth noting

I personally found the touch of golden copper at the back a great addition. It adds a hint of premium to an otherwise very basic phone design. I’m also pleasantly surprised that the headphone jack is still there, and it’s handy too. The single-grille speaker at the bottom just isn’t as loud as I would have wanted it.

Setting up your fingerprint is easy and quick, it’s actually trying to unlock the phone that makes it troublesome. I can’t remember any device I’ve used with a super sensitive fingerprint sensor like this one. You really need to be gentle with it, not hard press your finger on the sensor. But even then, the phone still wouldn’t unlock to the point that I just opted to use a pass code instead.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

At PhP 7,990 for the 3GB+32GB variant and PhP 5,990 for the 2GB+32GB variant, the OPPO A5s can be a good budget option depending on who wants to use it. First-timers in smartphones will enjoy a fast, responsive, and easy-to-navigate OS. If you’re a gamer on a tight budget, this device is very capable of providing enough juice for any game. And if you like taking pictures, its dual-camera rear setup gets the job done.

Despite it being a bang for the buck deal, there were features that this phone missed out on. Selfie lovers honestly should look for another option. In addition, the device doesn’t seem all too different in terms of design, plus there is no available option for higher storage and RAM, so performance will eventually dip.

The OPPO A5s caters to everyone looking for a great deal, but ultimately comes at the cost of key features not living up to expectations.

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