Automotive

Nissan promotes cleaner air at UEFA Champions League Final

Hundreds of vehicles with zero emission

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Now in its fifth season as Official Automotive Sponsor of the world’s largest annual sporting event, Nissan goes for cleaner air and brings a fleet of all-electric Nissan vehicles. The fleet used at UEFA Champions League Final consists of 363 units of the company’s famous LEAF and numerous e-NV200 vans to transport officials and visitors.

This is in line with the company’s long-term goal to electrify transportation and at the same time reduce the environmental impact in this high-traffic weekend in Madrid.


Adding to the lineup this year is a Nissan LEAF NISMO RC 2.0 race car. It will be used by Brazilian football legend Roberto Carlos as he delivers the UEFA Champions League Trophy from the UEFA Champions Festival in Puerta del Sol to the Estadio Metropolitano.

Carrying dual electric motors, all-wheel drive, and aggressive body shape, the LEAF NISMO RC 2.0 is seen as a testament to the latest innovations in the performance side of the Nissan Intelligent Mobility technology. It also has a special custom-designed aerodynamic trophy display case just for this event.

Moreover, this event also serves as preparation for Nissan to begin deliveries of the new LEAF e+ to European customers. This model ships with a new battery that can go as far 385km on a single charge, new personalization options, and is equipped with Nissan’s e-pedal and ProPILOT technologies.

Nissan says one of their goals during the event is to offer attendees the experience of zero-emissions transportation on the streets of Madrid — which is a city that is already at the forefront of electric vehicle revolution.

Just earlier this year, the company held its annual event that discusses and analyzes electrification of transportation in certain regions. You may read more about them to see Nissan’s plans for the near future.

Automotive

She implanted an RFID tag in her arm to operate a Tesla Model 3

A new way to never lose your keys again

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A software engineer who goes by the name Amie DD on YouTube wanted to do an ultimate Tesla Model 3 hack — one that involves implanting an RFID tag in her own body so she could unlock and operate her vehicle with just a wave of her arm.

She released a short documentary on her thought process and how she began the project. According to her, she’s not new to playing with RFID tags and implanting them in her body. So when she got her new Model 3 and found out it uses RFID to unlock and start the vehicle, she immediately came up with the idea.


To make this possible, Amie DD reached out to a body modification place capable of performing such procedures. You may watch the implant process here but be warned that it’s a bit graphic and shows blood.

She didn’t actually show in her video that it actually works but she told The Verge that it does. Amie DD even tweeted Elon Musk jokingly (probably) that she could run Musk’s Body Hacking Division.

It may sound cool and all — and props to her for having the courage to do something like that — but as for me, I think I’m okay with using standard keys right now.

 

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Automotive

Jaguar wants Oxford Dictionary to update the definition of ‘car’

Literally redefining what a car is

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Jaguar is calling for the Oxford English Dictionary and OxfordDictionaries.com to update their official online definition of the word ‘car’.

The need for action is because Jaguar’s I-PACE, the company’s all-electric performance SUV, recently won the 2019 World Car of the Year and European Car of the Year. However, technically, the zero-emission vehicle doesn’t fall under the ‘car’ category if we’re going by its official meaning.


If you check online, Oxford English Dictionary — the principal historical dictionary of the English language — defines a car as, “a road vehicle powered by a motor (usually an internal combustion engine) designed to carry a driver and a small number of passengers, and usually having two front and two rear wheels, esp. for private, commercial, or leisure use.”

Meanwhile, the current definition of a car on OxfordDictionaries.com, a collection of dictionary websites produced by Oxford University Press, is: “a road vehicle, typically with four wheels, powered by an internal combustion engine and able to carry a small number of people.”

Now, being widely regarded as the accepted authority on the English language, it just seems fitting to update the meaning of ‘car’. Jaguar has already submitted a formal application to both groups and have the definitions updated to include additional powertrains, including electric vehicles.

While these groups review the application, Jaguar is encouraging people to support the movement and share their thoughts on how the word should be defined. For those interested, you may use #RedefineTheCar along with your posts.

 

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Automotive

The 2019 Chevrolet Spark is a fun ride for everyone!

Does the job without the fuss

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Who says only the boys can have all the fun driving and testing out cars? Watch as I take the 2019 Chevrolet Spark around the city and explore its features and capabilities.

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