Camera Shootouts

Realme XT vs Samsung Galaxy A80 vs Huawei P30 vs iPhone XR: Camera shootout

Yet another four-way shootout

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Most of the smartphones that released a higher megapixel count belong in the midrange category. With this trend, we started wondering if these smartphones can actually hold their own against pricier smartphones from today’s top three brands.

In this shootout, we’re pitting the Realme XT against the Samsung Galaxy A80, Huawei P30, and the iPhone XR. For a fair-fight, we opted to use a regular shot for the Realme XT since its 64MP camera shoots 16MP photos by default. The Galaxy A80’s 48MP camera shoots 12MP by default, and the Huawei P30’s 40MP camera shoots 10MP. On the other hand, the iPhone XR shoots 12MP.

Of course, there were no filters applied and all settings are the same for all the smartphones. As usual, the photos are resized for you to load the images faster.

The answers to this test are found at the bottom of the page. Now, let’s start!

#1 – Ultrawide mode

#2 – Flat lay

#3 – Food

#4 – 2x zoom

#5 – Outdoor

#6 – Greenery

#7 – Selfie

#8 – Saturation

#9 – Macro

#10 – Interior

#11 – Low light

#12 – Lights

#13 – Night

#14 – Portrait mode

Here are the results of this camera shootout:

ARealme XT

BSamsung Galaxy A80

CHuawei P30

DiPhone XR

As you can see, the Realme XT does well despite belonging in the midrange category. Of course, the iPhone XR still leads the shootout with accurate color reproduction while the Huawei P30 and Samsung Galaxy A80 appeal to different kinds of users with a preference for warmer and cooler photos.

Nonetheless, the Realme XT opens up the possibility for consumers with a limited budget but still want to get value for money smartphones. In a few months, more midrange smartphones will shake the upper midrange and premium categories. For now, we can enjoy these midrange smartphones offering more than what we deserve. So, which photos did you like better?


This feature was produced in collaboration between GadgetMatch and Realme Philippines.

Camera Shootouts

Samsung Galaxy A73 5G vs vivo V23 5G: Camera Shootout

Which of these two East Asian 5G midrangers has the better cameras?

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What if you want a good set of cameras in a smartphone but you only have a budget below PhP 30,000/SG$ 700/INR 42,000 in your pocket?

GadgetMatch’s Camera Shootout segment isn’t particularly limited to high-end flagship smartphones with the best-in-class cameras. To prove that, I have tested two midrange phones by two different brands from two different East Asian countries.

Samsung, being a Korean giant, offers their top-notch midranger Galaxy A73 5G with a starting price of PhP 26,990/SG$ 698/INR 41,999. On the other hand, the Chinese phonemaker vivo has the V23 5G — directly competing at PhP 27,999/SG$ 699/INR 37,990.

The price gap isn’t that big to be a dealbreaker. But how about its camera quality? Let’s find out!

Disclaimer: Photo samples were taken in Auto, Portrait, and Night Mode. Photos were collaged, resized, and labeled for faster loading and preview. No other manipulations were applied.

Ultra-Wide

The Galaxy A73 5G and vivo V23 5G both have a decent set of ultra-wide cameras: 12MP vs 8MP respectively — both with an f/2.2 aperture. But which one is wider and better?

#1

#2

#3

#4

Wide

This is where things get a huge gap. The Samsung Galaxy A73 5G rocks a 108MP f/1.8 wide camera with PDAF and OIS. On the other hand, V23 5G’s megapixel count is half the size at 64MP with PDAF without OIS and an aperture of f/1.9 — but you’ll be the judge.

 #5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10 (Portrait)

#11 (Portrait)

#12

#13

#14

#15

#16

Zoom

Both phones don’t feature telephoto lenses. Instead, there are just the 5MP f/2.4 macro and depth sensors on the A73 5G and a 2MP f/2.4 macro sensor for the V23 5G.

To test both phones’ limits, here are some 2x shots that relied on digital zoom via its main sensor.

#17

#18

Low-Light Mode

I used the default Auto Mode in photos where I think the lengthy Night Mode is unnecessary.

#19 (Ultra-Wide)

#20

#21

Night Mode

For better low-light photo results, I opted to use Night Mode among those scenarios where there’s barely a major source of light.

#22 (Ultra-Wide)

#23

#24

#25A (1x)

#25B (2x zoom)

BONUS: Selfies

Sorry for ruining the great set of photos above but if you value front cameras more than the rear cameras, this is an extra segment for you to see which one is a better selfie shooter — both day and night.

The only clear difference is that the V23 5G has a set of front-facing LED flash versus A73 5G’s fill light through its bright Super AMOLED+ display.

1A: Daytime (1x)

1B: Daytime (Ultra-Wide)

2A: Low-light without flash/fill light (1x)

2B: Low-light without flash/fill light (Ultra-Wide)

3A: Low-light with flash/fill light (1x)

3B: Low-light with flash/fill light (Ultra-Wide)

Results

The camera duel between these two midrange smartphones ends here. To make it easier for you, results are consistent from the beginning ’til the bonus part:

Photo A — vivo V23 5G

Photo B — Samsung Galaxy A73 5G

Conclusion

As evident in the photo samples, the vivo V23 5G produces warmer photos. Meanwhile, the Galaxy A73 5G leans more towards the cooler side.

Although the White Balance (WB) accuracy depends on the photo-taker’s real-life witnessing, the V23 5G produced most of the color-accurate shots in this set — from food, greeneries, skies, inanimate objects, and even portraits.

The samples taken from the V23 5G also look more pleasing with better balance in High Dynamic Ranger (HDR) as well as the right amount of highlights, shadows, and saturation throughout the set.

While the ever-consistent cooler WB of the A73 5G can instantly be fixed by adjusting temperature levels, over-sharpened photos cannot be corrected via post. Although it helps emphasize photo details more, most of the time, it just destroys the image.

The issues are more evident when shooting Night Mode samples. Not because it produced brighter and sharper shots, it doesn’t mean it’s the photo that’s closer to reality. Albeit, Samsung’s software processing technique helped in one instance when I shot a low-light ultra-wide sample with Night Mode turned on and the V23 5G’s version looked badly smudged.

Lastly, the selfies are just a whole lot better in the Chinese midranger thanks to the inclusion of dual front-facing cameras with dual LED flash that its Korean counterpart failed to deliver.

Generally speaking, you won’t get regret getting either of these phones since, in other areas, they are pretty close in performance.

If having a bigger main sensor and an even wider ultra-wide sensor are big factors in choosing your next smartphone, get the Galaxy A73 5G. But if you want to shoot shots that are closer to the naked eye plus selfies that make you look and feel good, the vivo V23 5G delivered better.

Now, I regret saying my hot take before that the vivo V23 5G “doesn’t have the best cameras in any midranger right now” — when it delivered the better photo-centric outturn in this camera shootout.

SEE ALSO:

Taking photos to the next level with the vivo V23 5G

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Camera Shootouts

iPhone 13 Pro Max vs Huawei P50 Pro: Camera Shootout

Head-to-head camera battle between 2021 flagships

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We’re already in the year 2022, but it’s never too late to compare flagships from 2021.

Without a doubt, the iPhone 13 Pro Max is still one of the best mobile camera flagships around. But all before I upgraded to this new iPhone, the Huawei P50 Pro was my everyday companion in taking photos of almost everything from my point of view.

Comparing my everyday phone against my personal fave ever since I held it, can the Chinese giant’s current smartphone forerunner keep up or even beat the Apple to its core?

Disclaimer: All samples were taken in Auto Mode. Photos were collaged, resized, and labeled for faster loading and preview. No other manipulations were applied.

Wide

These two phones have obvious gaps in their respective main camera hardware: The iPhone 13 Pro Max has a smaller 12MP camera but with a wider f/1.5 aperture. Meanwhile, the Huawei P50 Pro has a smaller f/1.8 lens diaphragm but a bigger 64MP sensor.

#1

#2

#3


#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

Ultra-Wide

Both ultra-wide sensors of these phones are not far from each other: the P50 Pro has a 12MP sensor while the iPhone 13 Pro Max is equipped with a 13MP camera. The iPhone is at an advantage when it comes to low-light since it has an aperture of f/1.8 over P50 Pro’s f/2.2.

#9

#10

#11

#12

Zoom

The iPhone 13 Pro Max may lag behind in terms of lossless and cropped zoom since the P50 Pro can achieve 7x and 100x but the fruit phone can still keep up with its 3x telephoto lens over the Chinese flagship’s 3.5x periscope zoom.

#13

#14

#15

#16

#17

#18

Night Mode

Apple and Huawei have different Night Mode processing but for the sake of fairness of shooting in low-light scenarios, we’ve decided to turn on Night Mode on both phones completely.

#19

#20 (Zoom)

#21

#22 (Zoom)

#23 (Zoom)

#24 (Zoom)

#25

BONUS: 15x Moon Shot

Just for fun, I tried comparing moon shots between the two phones. I’ve only maxed both shots at 15x since it’s the maximum distance the iPhone 13 Pro Max can zoom in.

Results

Just like our recent camera shootout articles, this one also has consistent results all throughout:

Photo A — iPhone 13 Pro Max

Photo B — Huawei P50 Pr0

Conclusion

While the order of images were coherent since the beginning, some of you might have a harder time thinking which phone is which. Honestly in most scenarios, both phones can deliver great output regardless if you’re shooting food, architectural perspectives, portraits, pets, among others.

But if you’ve all noticed, the P50 Pro has the less brighter photo with lesser amounts of highlights but warmer all throughout. Meanwhile, the iPhone 13 Pro Max is in the more “cooler” side of the spectrum with an increased amount in highlights and contrast.

Sometimes, the 13 Pro Max is more color accurate as it was what I’ve seen with my naked eye, sometimes it’s the P50 Pro because of its warmer hues.

One thing is for sure: both phones delivered a consistent look in ALL lenses from wide, ultra-wide, and up until their zoom lenses. Huawei and Apple’s software engineering has marveled me over the years — especially with both of the companies’ power in AI and camera software algorithm.

On the flip side of the coin, the P50 Pro delivered brighter night shots versus its Apple counterpart. While its Leica coating and color science make up for most of the better low-light shots, the persistent warmer AWB (Auto White Balance) even at night is sometimes too much. Another minor issue that isn’t much of a big deal is that, it failed to deliver better output when capturing neon lights for over-reducing highlights.

But if you’ll ask me, I would still take the P50 Pro over the iPhone because it has the most flexible cameras — including a periscope lens that can zoom in further and even shoot the moon and the night sky whenever and wherever I want.

SEE ALSO:

vivo X80 Pro vs Huawei P50 Pro: Camera Shootout

vivo X80 Pro vs iPhone 13 Pro Max: Camera Shootout

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Camera Shootouts

vivo X80 Pro vs Huawei P50 Pro: Camera Shootout

Two Chinese “Pro” flagships, two premium camera partnerships

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Huawei’s P50 Pro may not be the most updated Android flagship out there. The phone being first launched in China last August 2021 (and January 2022 globally) makes it quite older than the vivo X80 Pro — its fresher counterpart from the same land, the People’s Republic of China.

But which Chinese “Pro” flagship is your best bet when it comes to mobile photography? vivo with ZEISS or Huawei with its last Leica-branded smartphone?

Disclaimer: All samples were taken in Auto Mode (except for Night Mode). Photos were collaged, resized, and labeled for faster loading and preview. No other manipulations were applied.

Wide

On paper, the vivo X80 Pro and Huawei P50 Pro has similar main camera hardware: a 50MP sensor with Laser AF (Auto Focus), PDAF (Phase Detection Auto Focus), and OIS (Optical Image Stabilization). The noticeable difference is that the X80 Pro has a wider aperture of f/1.57 compared to the P50 Pro’s f/1.8.

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

Ultra-Wide

There’s a big gap between the megapixel count of the two ultra-wide sensors. The X80 Pro has a 13MP “wide-angle” camera while the P50 Pro boasts a 48MP image sensor. Both have a f/2.2 lens opening though.

#9

#10

#11

#12

Zoom

On paper, the vivo has two zoom lenses: a 12MP f/1.9 telephoto lens with 2x optical zoom and a 8MP f/3.4 periscope lens capable of 5x optical zoom.

Huawei’s P50 Pro only has a single periscope telephoto lens with a f/3.5 aperture that can zoom optical up to 3.5x. For an (almost) equal fight, we only used the X80 Pro’s telephoto lens instead of the periscope.

#13

#14

#15

#16

Night Mode

Most of the time, Android smartphones automatically capture in Night Mode under low-light shooting conditions. But for equality, I’ve decided to shoot these in Night Mode instead. The main differences? Tthe lens coating and color science between vivo and ZEISS versus Huawei and Leica.

#17

#18

#19

#20 (Zoom)

BONUS A: 60x Moon Shot

While the P50 Pro can achieve as far as 100x digital zoom, vivo’s X80 Pro can only shoot up to 60x despite having a farther 5x periscope zoom lens.

BONUS B: Portrait Mode

For the curious ones who always take photos of people, the X80 Pro is at an advantage here. I can’t show you comparison shots since the P50 Pro isn’t as effective as how the X80 Pro does shots under Portrait Mode. Still, here are some samples using the special ZEISS Portrait Modes (that mimic ZEISS lenses) equipped in vivo’s camera software.

Whether day or night, the X80 Pro ZEISS Portrait Mode works wonders!

It even works on two people that some phones fail to achieve…

…regardless if it’s 1x “wide-angle” or 2x zoom.

Results

Just like our previous vivo X80 Pro shootout, this one also has consistent results all throughout:

Photo A — vivo X80 Pro

Photo B — Huawei P50 Pro

Conclusion

If you have read the first part of our vivo X80 Pro camera comparison that was compared to the iPhone 13 Pro Max, you would already have hints which of the photos belong to the X80 Pro — which are those that lean more into the less contrast-y and desaturated side.

Considering that the consumer population usually vote for the more saturated image output, I wouldn’t be surprised that most of you picked those under Photo B — which were taken using the Huawei P50 Pro.

In some scenarios, the vivo X80 Pro’s overall camera software and hardware comes handy where it relies on better color accuracy, HDR (High Dynamic Range) and AWB (Auto White Balance) that the Huawei P50 Pro has overdone with its particularly different camera processing algorithm.

Despite the output, I still care less as I’m the type of user who usually post-processes my shots via third-party imaging software such as VSCO, Lightroom, and Snapseed.

Still, the Huawei P50 Pro with its “color-boosted” photos are the ones you can directly post on socials. It simply is most people’s cup of tea, and that’s not a bad thing. Choosing the X80 Pro’s images isn’t a bad thing either. Food shots are just a tad better on the Huawei without the annoying radial blur effect.

If we compare Night Mode samples, the P50 Pro and X80 Pro are actually quite close in performance. The only difference is that, P50 Pro relies on warmer temperature with less highlights that make lights appear less bright. Also, if you’re dreaming about clear moon shots without buying a telescope or any other accessory, the P50 Pro is one among the few phones that can truly deliver — just next to the Galaxy S22 Ultra and S21 Ultra.

SEE ALSO:

iPhone 13 Pro Max vs Huawei P50 Pro: Camera Shootout

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra vs Huawei P50 Pro: Camera Shootout

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