Features

Will Apple kill iPhone 7 headphone jack?

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At 7.1 mm today’s iPhone 6S is almost as thin as your average pencil.

But can it get any thinner?

Among the many engineering challenges smartphone manufacturers face, reducing smartphone component size has always been a work in progress. For Apple, the last 8 years of innovation have shaved off more than 4.5 mm from the original iPhone.

But there is at least one component, even the best engineer can’t shrink — the headphone jack. And so, in an effort to make the next iPhone thinner than ever, Apple is reportedly planning on ditching it altogether.

Sure, in doing so, Apple risks upsetting millions of iPhone users that have invested in a pair of wired headphones, but this isn’t the first time Apple’s tested its vaunted brand loyalty.

Back in 2012, the company phased out its 30-pin cable in lieu of the more technologically advanced and space efficient Lightning port. In one sweeping motion, Apple effectively crippled the iPhone’s ability to work with hundreds of accessories that relied on the 9-year-old connector.

It was a painful transition process, but not one without merit. The new Lightning port brought with it faster charging times and data transfer speeds, and the ability to dock new iPhones and iPads to external monitors.

In 2016, another painful technological shift is upon us, and this time around, it’s all about space.

Universally, the standard size for any headphone port is 3.5mm. Barring some engineering miracle, if you add that to the millimeter or two taken up by the phone’s display and frame, you’ll hit the physical limits of a phone’s thinness. By removing the headphone jack altogether, Apple is removing this limitation, and freeing up a considerable amount of space in the process.

More space means more room for other features that previously weren’t possible. Maybe dual front facing speakers, an additional (or better) camera module, or perhaps, and more likely, a larger, longer lasting battery.

But how then will users listen to music?

iphone-6s-headphone-jack

According to the Internet rumor mill, Apple is working on cordless earbuds that resemble ear plugs. These wireless buds will let you listen to music while untethered from your phone, and will come with built-in microphones so you can speak commands to Siri.

While wireless earbuds are cool and all, don’t count wired headphones out just yet. Among its many talents, Apple’s superstar Lightning port is also capable of carrying audio signals, meaning it can also function as a headphone jack. In fact, you can already buy Lightning port headphones for $300 on Amazon (see the Philips M2L/27). To appease critics, it also isn’t far fetched that Apple may also offer, for a fee, a Lightning port to headphone jack adapter or its own lightning port headphones. Whatever the case, we wouldn’t bother breaking a sweat.

Just like the time Apple removed the Ethernet port and CD-ROM drive from its MacBook line of laptops, just like the time it phased out FireWire from the iPod and the 30-pin port from the iPhone, we expect users to grumble under their breath and live with it until the day they realized Apple was right all along, just ahead of its time.

With reporting from Nico Baguio

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Features

Samsung Galaxy S10 vs Galaxy S10+ vs Galaxy S10E: What are the differences?

A decade of Galaxies

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Samsung has launched three new flagship phones: the Galaxy S10, Galaxy S10+, and Galaxy S10E. With three new models to choose from, it might be difficult to choose which Galaxy S10 is the one for you.

To help with this, we took the liberty to show you the differences between the three. Which of the Galaxy S10 models will be your GadgetMatch?

Display

Starting with the screen, the three Galaxy S10 models sport Super AMOLED displays in different sizes. The Galaxy S10E is the smallest among the bunch with a 5.8-inch display. It’s followed by the regular Galaxy S10 with its 6.1-inch display and, of course, the Galaxy S10+ with its large 6.4-inch panel.

It’s also worth noting that the Galaxy S10E has a completely flat display, while the other two Galaxy S10 variants have the curved panels we’ve come to expect from Samsung.

All three models don’t sport a notch, but they do have holes on the upper-right corner for their front cameras. The Galaxy S10E and Galaxy S10 have a perfectly rounded hole-punch camera, while Galaxy S10+ has a pill-shaped cutout since it has two front-facing cameras.

Performance

Despite the size differences of the phones, all models are powered by a flagship processor. Depending on where you are, the Galaxy S10 family will sport either a Snapdragon 855 or an Exynos 9820.

Memory and storage configuration will also vary depending on the region. The lowest possible memory available is 6GB and it can go as high 12GB. As for storage, it starts at 128GB and will reach up to 1TB. The 12GB+1TB combo will be exclusively available for the Galaxy S10+.

Another significant difference between the Galaxy S10 phones is battery capacity. The Galaxy S10E has a modest 3100mAh battery, the Galaxy S10 owns a pretty standard 3400mAh battery, and the Galaxy S10+, being the biggest of the three, comes with a huge 4100mAh battery.

All three variants support fast charging using wired or wireless chargers. They can also do reverse wireless charging (which Samsung calls Wireless PowerShare) to charge other devices using the Qi wireless standard.

Lastly, both the Galaxy S10 and Galaxy S10+ feature the new ultrasonic in-display fingerprint reader, which is definitely faster than any of the in-display fingerprint readers we’ve tried before. The Galaxy S10E has a more conventional side-mounted fingerprint reader that’s still accurate and fast, but not as advanced.

Cameras

The Galaxy S10 and the Galaxy S10+ are the first among the Galaxy S lineup to have triple rear cameras. The setup is composed of a main 12-megapixel Dual Pixel and Dual Aperture camera, a 16-megapixel ultra wide-angle, and a 12-megapixel telephoto with 2x optical zoom.

Since the Galaxy S10E is priced lower, it only has two of the three rear cameras of its more expensive siblings: the main Dual Pixel camera and the ultra wide-angle shooter.

The situation in the front is quite different, though. Both the Galaxy S10 and Galaxy S10E have a single selfie camera, while the Galaxy S10+ gets an extra depth sensor for a more precise bokeh effect or Live Focus.

Pricing and colors

The cheapest model is the Galaxy S10E which starts at US$ 750. The regular Galaxy S10 will set you back US$ 900, while the bigger Galaxy S10+ is priced at US$ 1,000.

All three models will come in Prism White, Prism Black, Prism Green, and Prism Blue. In addition, the Galaxy S10E will be available in Canary Yellow, as well. The Galaxy S10+ also has premium Ceramic Black and Ceramic White variants, but these are only available for the high-tier configurations.

Colors option may vary per region, so not all colors will be available in all markets.

Get to know more about the latest Galaxy S10 series by watching our hands-on video:

SEE ALSO: Samsung Galaxy S10 Hands-on: A refinement of everything

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Galaxy S10

Instagram photo challenge with the Samsung Galaxy S10

Hands-on with all three versions!

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Samsung’s newest Galaxy S devices have just been announced and we’re blessed with three versions: The Samsung Galaxy S10e (small), the Galaxy S10 (big), and the Galaxy S10+ (big big!).

Each phone is equipped with a number of cameras so you know what that means: IG photo test!

In our Her GadgetMatch video, we check out what’s so cool about the new Samsung phones and test what the cameras can do. Spoiler: They do a lot!

In case you’re having trouble viewing, watch HERE.

SEE ALSO: Samsung’s new LED light cover is the phone case we’ve always wanted

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Galaxy S10

Samsung Galaxy S10 Hands-On

Does it live up to the hype?

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Infinity-O Display, five cameras, in-display fingerprint reader, next-generation wireless charging: these four features define Samsung’s new Galaxy S10.

When you take its features apart like this, it makes it seem like what we have is yet another underwhelming phone with no new groundbreaking feature. But to look at the S10 that way does the phone an injustice. It’s one that needs to be taken as a whole, not a sum of its parts.

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