Unfiltered

Our security shouldn’t only be Huawei’s price to pay

The Chinese company is an unfortunate casualty in a war it shouldn’t be fighting alone 

Donald's Trumps tough stance on China leaves Huawei a casualty. MJ Jucutan / GadgetMatch

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It’s official. American companies can again do business with Chinese tech giant Huawei. 

This weekend, a confusing six weeks after the ban went into effect, US President Donald Trump reversed his own executive order following negotiations with Chinese President Xi Jinping during a leader’s summit in Japan. 

It means existing and future Huawei smartphones will continue to enjoy unfettered access to Android updates, as well as other Google services including the Google Play app store. 

It also means US companies like Qualcomm, Intel, and Micron can continue to supply the parts that Huawei needs to continue building phones.

But it doesn’t mean that Huawei can start selling devices in the US, at least not yet. 

The company’s entry into the US market is being left on the table as a talking point in the US’ ongoing trade negotiations with China. Speaking to journalists after the G20 Summit, President Trump said, “We’ll have to save that to the very end, we’ll have to see.”

The move is an interesting turning point in the continuing trade battle between the two superpowers,  where Huawei sadly and unfairly appears to be a casualty of war

Over the last few years, it has become harder for Huawei to do business in the United States following claims that its hardware is a threat to US national security. Claims that have, for the most part, gone unsubstantiated. Warnings have come from both the US Congress and the intelligence community. Mr. Trump himself has been quoted as saying, “Huawei is something that is very dangerous.”

But with Huawei’s access being used as leverage in trade negotiations, one can’t help but ask if there is – or was – any basis for these allegations. Or were fears and assumptions instead blown out of proportion, simply to put pressure on China? 

What’s clear is that consumer confidence in the brand has taken a major hit, so much so that it will be interesting to see how Huawei intends on bouncing back from this crisis. That’s unfortunate to see, considering the company’s massive contribution to the smartphone industry over the last two to three years. Where growth has slowed and many brands have merely iterated, Huawei has arguably pushed innovation hardest.    

Huawei Mate X

Huawei hopes to forge into the future with its foldable Mate X smartphone. Photo by Marvin Velasco / GadgetMatch

The tea leaves point to the company relying on its dominance in the 5G race, where it appears to be miles ahead of its competition. With or without Google, expect the Chinese firm to also push even harder in the smartphone space. Its foldable Mate X smartphone is nearing its release date and could possibly be a game changer. 

Still, I wonder, is it a little too late, and is the damage dealt beyond repair?    

As the story develops. It opens up a host of other questions and issues that beg to be considered.

Sure, concerns about China are not without basis. But how big of a threat is China (the country) to global consumers? And are all Chinese tech companies, solely by virtue of their origin or association, equally worth being wary of? 

While privately owned Chinese corporations like Huawei have insisted that they “will not build backdoors and hand over customer data,” experts fear that no Chinese company can be completely independent of its government. Looming over any such promise, the Chinese Counter-Espionage legislation mandates organizations to assist the government in intelligence work when deemed necessary.

But if this were the case, what about devices built with Chinese-made components? Chances are, you either own or are using one right now. Is it then even realistic to assume that we can live in a world without Chinese tech and manufacturing?

US government concerns about Huawei find ground in the company’s leadership in networking equipment and its potential dominance over 5G infrastructure. Anyone with that much power over something so vital can be a threat. But one can argue that the same can be said of any other company or country: the tech industry, after all, is built on a global supply chain. China does not have a monopoly on spying and hacking. Remember Russia? If China is a threat, so is every other technology superpower — including the US.

So what now? And how do we mitigate these risks in a way that doesn’t simultaneously deprive us of the next generation of industry advances?

By no means am I a security expert, nor do I have all the answers. But what’s clear to me is that restricting trade hinders innovation. And being technologically backward is a security threat in and of itself.     

It’s also clear that the means by which the US has chosen to engage with China hurts all of us. Not only does it set a bad precedent its ramifications also extend beyond innovation and geopolitics.

Our combined national security shouldn’t be only Huawei’s price to pay.

It’s 2019 and we live in a global village that is intricately interconnected. National security is our collective cross to bear because if these threats are otherwise unresolved, we all suffer.

This, even more than a trade issue, is a cybersecurity one. And while governments should be expected to step up to defend their citizens from potential holes in network security with progressive and ethical solutions, while utopic, I would love to see as a next step, the creation of an independent international body supported by us all. A group with no other interest in mind but that of consumers made up of great minds from both the West and the East.

Such a group would be responsible for testing hardware and software, and coming up with transparent solutions, separated from politics and uncolored by trade negotiations. Solutions that allow us to navigate this new world without paranoia, and with the freedom to choose the devices that we believe best match our needs. 

Want to read this post in German? Visit MobileGeeks.de to see a translation!

Smartphones

What we want to see on the Samsung Galaxy Fold 2

It can only get better

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By now you’ve all probably heard or read everything that people have to say about the Samsung Galaxy Fold. It certainly made several headlines in 2019 for various reasons.

While we do think it is a step in the right direction, we also believe it needed a bit more time in the oven. After spending roughly two weeks with the Galaxy Fold, here are a few things I wish would happen with the inevitable Galaxy Fold 2.

A form factor that makes more sense 

As it is now, when folded, the Galaxy Fold’s screen feels like it’s half a phone, and when unfolded it feels like it’s three-fourths of a tablet. This current form factor just isn’t it.

That’s really bad screen-to-body ratio

We’ve already seen reports of a Galaxy Fold that’s more of a phone and then folds into something smaller. Something reminiscent of the Motorola razr.

I don’t think that’s the only thing Samsung is doing. Best believe the direction is still to have something that’s a fully functioning smartphone when folded, and a full-sized tablet when unfolded.

Better app support

If they can figure out how to do this properly, that might solve many of the Fold’s shortcomings. For instance, as of writing, the Galaxy Fold doesn’t support the latest version of Netflix.

No Netlfix and chillin’ on this one :(

I was so excited to binge on this thing only to find out that, unfortunately, I can’t.

Because of the form-factor, some games also just do not look right. The controls on NBA 2K20 take up nearly half the screen. It’s nearly impossible to see what’s going on, making the whole experience just unenjoyable.

Controls completely blocking off a huge part of the screen

I guess it doesn’t make sense to have regular app updates for a device that only a handful of people own. That’s one of the major hurdles of foldables.

Take away that ugly notch

Whatever you’re watching, whatever you’re playing, it’s impossible to not notice the eyesore that is the front-facing camera. I also dread the punch-hole solution but that would have been way better than what we got.

Not a pretty sight

Make it thinner and lighter

The Galaxy Fold is just unwieldy. Sure, you can grip it with one hand when it’s folded but it’s a little too thick than what I’d like.

Hard to tell here because I have fat hands 😂

The tablet form is pretty much what you’d expect from other tablets when it comes to weight and thickness. Which might be an indication that the Galaxy Fold was first a tablet before a phone.

Here’s the folded Galaxy Fold next to a PS4 game’s Blu-ray case

Whatever the case is, a thinner and lighter version will be more than welcome.

Race to be the best

Everything I mentioned here are pretty much expected growing pains from a first-generation device. We don’t always get it right the first time and that’s okay.

Samsung can now claim they are the first to market this new device category. But will they also be the first one to perfect it? If they are the innovators they claim to be, then I wouldn’t be surprised if they completely re-imagine their approach to foldable devices.

For more thoughts on the Galaxy Fold read our hands-on. For some laughs, check this one out.

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Unfiltered

Our data shouldn’t be used as currency for technology to move forward

Companies shouldn’t mine it like gold and oil

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Illustrations by Marcus Jucutan

Security and privacy have become the issues we’re concerned about in this generation. Technology has cemented itself as a commodity; a constant in our lifestyle and in everything we do.

For the past year, we’ve seen data breaches from Facebook particularly the Cambridge Analytica scandal, hackers attacking big tech companies, voice assistants listening to our conversations, and technology being used to further one’s political agenda.

Right now, we all fear for our personal data. The world isn’t safe anymore, and here we are, being more afraid of cybersecurity posing a threat to our safety.

Is data the most important thing right now?

When I was in Hong Kong, my friend and I stayed in Tuen Mun, a 20-minute drive away from Shenzhen, China. Due to proximity, my browser and location have geo-tagged China instead of Hong Kong. Websites have been translated to Mandarin, too.

My friend and I laughed, whispering to ourselves “Welcome to China.” Amidst the jokes and frantic laughing, I was fearful about my personal security. Throwing away the naivety, we all know the issue surrounding this country relating to data and privacy. For years, we’ve accused China of harvesting our information that we became cautious about visiting the country or when using a Chinese-branded smartphone like Huawei, Xiaomi, Vivo, and OPPO.

Data has become the new currency that people are trading off; the new gold and oil, where people fight to mine and own it.

Of course, I’m afraid of my data being stolen for unknown purposes. There was an added fear during my stay since I was in the midst of rallies. But what scared me isn’t the chances of me getting caught in the crossfire, it was all the stuff I have on the internet.

What if the government caught wind of my political statements in my social media accounts and private messages? What if they knew I was siding with Hong Kong and their fight for democracy? Will I be deported? Jailed? I spiraled in anxiety and fear.

Gratefully, I left Hong Kong safe and sound. On a series of flights bound for Manila and Boracay, I pondered about the fear I had: Was data the most important thing right now?

Finding the answer

It seems the stars aligned because my thoughts happened right before the annual CxO Innovation Summit. Held by VST-ECS Philippines, the conference discussed the future and importance of data in today’s technology.

“There is no doubt that in today’s digital economy, most companies — if not all — are aware of the importance of data and the value it provides,” said Jimmy Go, President/CEO of VST-ECS Philippines. Of course, this conference was meant for enterprises to tackle how they can utilize data to improve their businesses.

Technology is here to stay and we can’t hinder progress because we’re scared.

Go further explained how big companies like Netflix and Amazon uses data analytics to track a user’s pattern based on their searches and activity, then recommends content and product for you, which is mostly things you don’t like (or do you?).

But it wasn’t Go who only shared insights and industry trends. The summit is joined by leaders in the cybersecurity, computers and electronics, and information technology industries. Among the top players with key representatives are Cisco, Lenovo, Fortinet, Hewlett-Packard, Dell Technologies, IBM, Schneider Electric, Samsung, Huawei, Aruba, and Oracle.

Data mining is a circular economy

Throughout the sessions, most companies discussed how to harness data and utilize available technology to further an enterprise’s progress. Channeling my self-obsessed personality, I asked: “Where am I in this narrative?”

Consumers don’t realize that companies use their data for research and marketing purposes. Some use it for noble goals like improving one’s life through technology, and some do it for the sake of expanding and future-proofing their businesses.

It’s like a cycle: Your data was acquired, analyzed, shared, translated, received and find its way back. Data has become the new currency that people are trading off; the new gold and oil, where people fight to mine and own it.

We need companies we can trust

When the conference ended, I left and sipped margaritas by the beach — allowing myself to absorb all the truths I found. Come to think of it: Isn’t it scary that Facebook suggests items you’ve previously viewed on Lazada and Shopee? How about the promoted post on your news feed about a lipstick you recently talked about with your friend on Messenger? This is how our data is being used and learning a lot about this process, I was astounded.

It dawned on me: Technology is here to stay and we can’t hinder progress because we’re scared. But what we can do is to find companies we can trust.

To find better resolve, I asked Samsung and Huawei — two of the biggest players in the consumer technology industry. I first met with Patrick Low, Principal Architect for CTO Office Huawei Enterprise Business Group.

Big Data is the enemy (or not?)

In an exclusive interview with GadgetMatch, Low discussed how consumers’ data are being acquired everywhere. Contrary to myths about Huawei, the executive debunked the rumors and discussed how apps are the culprit of data mining, not smartphones.

Samsung Product Manager Anton Andres supported Low’s statement in another exclusive interview. Andres expounded how third-party apps like keyboards try to hijack personal information. Both executives warned users about the apps they download.

On the bright side, both companies believe they’re doing enough to protect their consumers’ data and security. Huawei claims they don’t touch data, while Samsung parades its security solutions found exclusively on their devices. Of course, take everything with a grain of salt. It’s okay to trust at this point, but with reservations.

Taking into consideration what both Low and Andres stated, I started to wonder if big data is the enemy here. If big data sounds martian to you, it’s a technology used to analyze and help companies understand our behavior and preferences. It’s primarily the reason why you get advertisements about an item you were browsing in an e-commerce site or getting contact suggestions from the people in the same vicinity as you.

But as one friend pointed out, big data isn’t our enemy. It’s the abusers of the technology and the perpetrators who use it for their greed and personal agenda.

How can we protect ourselves?

As the world gets more connected, it is up for us to arm ourselves against the threats looming in. Start first on your devices: Use strong passwords and make it a habit to change them regularly.

Social-media wise, check your privacy and sharing settings. When you have an inactive account, find a way to close it. Additionally, read the terms and conditions for every app you download. Consider the risks of using digital assistants like Alexa and keeping an unsecured Wi-Fi, too.

The world is getting more connected, and there’s no stopping it.

There are so many things to do. Make sure you understand what data you’re sending and how your location is being tracked. Right now, it might be easy for you to say that tech companies like Google and Facebook already have a lot of information about us, or they don’t have anything to get since we’re not rich. But cybersecurity isn’t only for the rich people to worry about, it’s for everyone who has access to a connected world.

Sure, we won’t be a hundred percent safe from the possible threats. Thieves are getting smarter, and we need to be smarter than them. Keep yourself informed, that’s the best you can do to significantly decrease the chances of your personal security being compromised. The world is getting more connected, and there’s no stopping it.

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Editors' Choice

Foldable phones arrived in 2019 but do we really need them?

Or is it just a gimmick?

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2019 has definitely been an exciting year thanks to the numerous advances we’ve made in mobile technology. We’re one step closer to the 5G revolution, the number of camera lenses on a phone has drastically increased, and affordable phones offer more features than ever.

However, this year witnessed a major milestone. Samsung has been working on foldable displays for years. Their AMOLED display technology is unchallenged and the brand wanted to leverage it for other futuristic projects like a bendable phone.

The Samsung Galaxy Fold was unveiled and was supposed to go on sale soon. But, the initial units were found to be extremely delicate and journalists ended up with broken display within no time. Samsung was quick to acknowledge the fault and delayed the commercial launch by a few months. In the end, the Fold was available commercially and despite its hefty price tag, the response has been positive.

Though, everyone who bought the phone knew what they’re getting — first-generation technology. This means the product still has a lot of room for improvement due to future advancements and this is just the stepping stone. Samsung has been confident that it’ll be able to carve out a new market for foldable phones and recent reports have also suggested a low-cost foldable phone could be in the works.

But why do we need a foldable phone?

Ideally, a foldable phone has a lot of use case scenarios. A phone can be easily converted into a tablet for a bigger display (Fold’s implementation) or we could just fold a phone and make it smaller (Motorola razr’s setup). The technology offers more room for designers to play around with.

Following the footsteps of Samsung, Huawei too unveiled the Mate X this year, but there’s no word on its commercial launch due to the ongoing US ban. Ultimately, every phone maker is keen on getting on board this trend because everyone is talking about it.

Why foldable phones are still a niche?

Practically though, it’s a risky bet to actually replace your conventional phone with a foldable one. Firstly, the body of the phone is often considered sensitive and cannot handle drops like a usual phone. A single crack on the screen could render it useless and fixing a bendable screen isn’t going to be a pocket-friendly affair.

Secondly, the industry is yet to accept foldable phones as a mainstream offering. A decade back, the developer industry was scrambling to make their apps work on a 16:9 screen of a smartphone. Similarly, foldable phones have a unique set of challenges in the user interface that need to be addressed individually. Samsung has implemented a pretty smooth UI, but not all apps are actually scaling or transitioning smoothly.

Adding to this, foldable phones lack a standardized size. The modern standard for a mobile’s screen is anywhere between 16:9 and 20:9. The Fold has an aspect ratio of 21:9, while the smaller display is extremely tall. On the other hand, the Motorola razr gets a different size, increasing the complexity.

Obviously, this isn’t the first time we’ve seen sensitive phones or weird display sizes. The Mi MIX series looks stunning with an edge-to-edge screen but is also extremely delicate. BlackBerry has launched a few phones that have a square display and a physical keyboard.

But these phones don’t cost as much as a foldable phone. And that’s exactly why a customer would think twice before getting one. Is the folding property enough to convince a potential customer?

Foldables vs 5G

While we’re discussing foldable phones, another technology is maturing fast and ready to take over the world. Qualcomm recently held its 5G Summit and announced two new chipsets — Snapdragon 765 and 865.

Both of them support 5G network and the flagship 865 chipset only supports 5G. There’s no extension available to support 4G. In the coming year, the two most trending keywords shall be “foldable” and “5G”. What will you prioritize?

There’s no doubt that foldable phones are the future. But with so many brands trying to make a mark in a short span of time, it just feels a little early to join the party. Especially because a lot of brands lack long-term goal and are simply trying to milk the current trend.

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