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Fortnite Battle Royale is officially out on iOS

Victory royale on the go

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The war for battle royale supremacy rages on. While the decision for best BR game is still out, Fortnite Battle Royale is cashing in on a market that PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds already holds — the mobile arena.

Previously, Epic Games’ Fortnite released a beta version of their battle royale game for the iOS. On launch, the mobile app was released on an invite-only basis. Despite the relative laxness of the invite system, the beta version was a speed bump in making their stake on mobile.

After only a short time in beta testing, Fortnite is finally ready for a wider release. Starting today, Apple users running iOS 11 or later can download the game and get in on the action. Compatible devices include both the iPhone and the iPad.

(If you’re holding out for the Android release, there’s no word yet on when it lands. Users speculate that it will launch later this year, though.)

Before Fortnite’s wider launch, only PUBG enjoyed an official release on mobile. Despite its popularity, players reported that bots filled the game to the brim. One can only hope that Fortnite won’t suffer the same computer-controlled fate.

Amid uncertainties, Fortnite is still doing well for itself. Following a blockbuster February in sales, the game has run through a flurry of updates and milestones. It has since added 50-versus-50 battles, sniper-only modes, new weapons, and massive cosmetic options. Epic Games has even launched a dance contest to add to their growing list of dance emotes.

Fortnite is on a roll. Its mobile release is only the latest (but not the last) move to cement its legacy past that of PUBG’s. Fortnite on iOS is now available on the App Store.

SEE ALSO: Is Fortnite Battle Royale a worthy PUBG console alternative?

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Microsoft replaces journalists with AI for its news service

Part of the company’s push towards using AI for its services

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These days, we often hear of AI or artificial intelligence and computers taking over the jobs of people. The latest company to join the party is Microsoft. The Redmond-based company is now replacing its hired journalists with AI to curate news for MSN and Microsoft News.

The move comes after a company-wide reshuffling this month. Microsoft is slowly building its artificial intelligence capabilities like other Silicon Valley companies. As such, MSN and Microsoft News will increasingly rely on AI for news curation and recommendation. This doesn’t mean, however, that Microsoft will stop dependence on human curators and editors. Currently, it employs more than 800 editors around the world.

The layoffs are not only affecting those based in the US. There are also reports that Microsoft is also letting go of people in the UK as part of the broader push towards AI.

Microsoft is no stranger towards using its own AI for its services. As a matter of fact, it is already using AI to scan news content and process it. It is also using AI to suggest photos that a human editor can pair with another one. The company has also been pushing for the use of AI to news publishers and journalists.

Source: The Verge

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Twitter adds draft, schedule tweets on the web

Sending tweets just got more flexible

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Photo by Yucel Moran on Unsplash

Sending tweets just got more flexible. Twitter is now adding an option for users to draft a tweet which they can continue later. Plus, there is now an option to schedule when a tweet should be posted.

Users don’t have to do anything to take advantage of these new features. Twitter has enabled these features just recently to everyone after experimenting with them in November.

For users who want to draft a tweet, they simply have to click “X” on the tweet window. A prompt to save the tweet will appear. Clicking “Save” will send the tweet to the “Unsent Tweet” where users can see a list of their drafted tweets.

It is important to note that drafted tweets will sync only on the web version of Twitter. There’s no option yet to see web version drafted tweets on the mobile app.

Meanwhile, those who wanted to schedule their tweets can do so by clicking on the new calendar icon on the bottom left of the tweet window. By doing so, a schedule option will appear, and users can change the date and time of the tweet’s post schedule.

Twitter Support prepared a little video for those who prefer to watch these new features in action:

These new features are surely a welcome addition to the platform. Perhaps, users who wanted to clarify their thoughts first before tweeting should greatly benefit from this feature. Now, if only Twitter would give its users an option to edit tweets. It’s still a pipe dream, but with new changes being introduced to the platform, it’s not impossible.

Source: The Verge

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Microsoft adds new spellcheck system for Chrome on Windows

Embracing an open-source ecosystem

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There’s no error in the headline, Microsoft is indeed helping Google’s Chrome browser work better thanks to a new spellcheck system. This move will not just help Chrome though, it’ll also enable Edge browser with improved spellcheck. Getting too confusing? Here’s a simple explanation.

The Chromium project is a free and open-source repository, just like Android. Anyone can use it, edit it, or build upon it. Google’s Chrome browser is based on this project, and so is Microsoft’s Edge. Other browsers utilizing this backend technology are Torch, Brave, Amazon Silk, and many more.

How is Microsoft helping Google? It’s bringing a new spell checker on Windows 8.1 and newer for all Chromium browsers.  Until now, Chromium browsers were leveraging open-source proofing tools for spell checking. By collaborating directly with Google’s Chromium engineers, Microsoft has enabled Windows Spellcheck for all Chromium browsers.

The new Windows Spellcheck will support URLs, acronyms, email addresses, additional languages along with various dialects, and a shared custom dictionary. The new system replaces Microsoft’s Hunspell Spellcheck tool.

The update is among more than 1,900 such changes Microsoft has contributed to the browser’s project. The new spell checker is live on Edge with version 83.

While this announcement may not seem to be very exciting, it underlines an essential change in Microsoft’s strategy. The software company has a notorious reputation of being against open-source. However, it has radically changed its position in the last handful of years. After the fall of Windows Mobile, it was a clear lesson that the future is about embracing an open eco-system instead of a partial one.

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