Entertainment

5 iconic shows with relatable female characters

From silly to badass!

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Happy Women’s month! It’s that time of year to look at all the progress we’ve made and be empowered by stunning women everywhere in the world. But, not all of us are put-together as every woman we strive to be. Some of us are sassy, silly, clumsy, and even sometimes, nasty. Here are a few iconic women characters I personally relate to:

Jessica Day from New Girl

Alright, she needed to be here because she revolutionized quirky nerdy girls and made them so charming in being themselves.

Jess is the only lady living in her shared apartment where she struggles to get almost absolutely everything done. Sound familiar? Yes, it’s all of us lost and struggling ladies out here trying to just get through every day.

Jess is awkward and charmingly so which is why, as much as we may not all be as charming when we’re silly, she’s undeniably relatable.

Gina Linetti from Brooklyn Nine-nine

This one was a little bit sombre for lovers of the Nine-nine but, I’ll skip any sort of spoiling. Gina is essentially Brooklyn Nine-nine’s civilian administrator. She’s funny, sassy, and sometimes, reasonably self-absorbed but, seeing her character progress and mature, she deserves to gloat.

She’s sensitive to everyone in the Nine-nine and is surprisingly the voice of reason sometimes. Gina can be a hell of a lot smart when she wants or needs herself to be so the girl deserves all the cred she’s wanted.

Connie Maheswaran from the Steven Universe Series

Connie is Steven’s best friend. She’s a strong and smart character who has stereotypical strict Asian parents. Granted stereotypical, I admit, having strict Asian parents myself, I relate to her a lot especially when she often plots her future while reassuring her parents of her safety.

She struggles a lot with trying to maintain a sense of almost usefulness to the Crystal Gems since she wants to protect the planet she calls home. She may seem like a bland character but she’ll surprise you with how she develops in the series.

Maeve Wiley from Sex Education

I’ll preface Maeve’s description with the fact that I studied under a curriculum that allowed me to discover wonderful female writers, authors, and novelists. I was pretty much introduced to literary concepts and so it was nice to find a character that had an interest in female writers.

When I brought this up with my boyfriend, he then talked about how she seemed cool and gave me a joking glance. To which, I replied saying, “The girl has baggage too and I can relate to that.” Getting by isn’t easy and Maeve has her own demons, which is why I think she’s relatable in how she forcibly portrays someone who juggles the gritty parts of life.

Nairobi from Money Heist (La Casa De Papel)

Alright, alright. Nairobi isn’t exactly someone we can all relate to. She’s right smack in the middle of a messy heist! How are we meant to relate to her character at all? Well, I think if you’ve been in a group project you’ll understand that Nairobi is the one that puts everyone in their place.

Tokyo is too erratic compared to the sensible-under-pressure Nairobi. She gets things done, says things as it is, and still manages to sympathize. To me, she’s the character I admired the most in the series.

There’s a lot of female characters across platforms that we strive to be, but sometimes, we just need someone to make us feel like we aren’t alone. I’m sure you’ll find something you find relatable in unlikely female characters like Nairobi from Money Heist.

There are a ton more women in series than there were before but, I don’t think there’s been enough. It’s slow-paced progress to giving women a safe and supportive platform where they can speak. We obviously aren’t there yet but, we’ll keep pursuing it. So, to all the fabulous, stunning, and true-to-oneself women out there, Happy Women’s month. Let’s keep kicking ass.

Entertainment

The cost of the post-pandemic movie

Why you should care about Mulan’s terrible premiere

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The fate of the Hollywood blockbuster rests on a fingertip. A formerly grandiose affair with celebrities dressing up to the nines, the red-carpet premiere is now an impossibility thanks to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. On the other side, streaming services blossomed with new titles and exclusives. It was (and is) a great era for the home theater. But the home theater will not last forever. Hollywood is now facing a crisis for the future of the premiere.

If the past year is any indication, Hollywood will, of course, not go down without a fight. Large networks and production houses have released their own streaming platforms to monopolize their content, putting additional weight on a consumer’s budget. Take Disney’s Disney+ or NBC’s Peacock, for instance. Now, a few of these (like Disney and Netflix) make their own blockbuster content as well. We’ve seen Netflix’s streaming-only premieres already. How about Disney’s (or anyone else’s) Hollywood premieres, which often rely on astounding box office numbers?

This week, we got a taste of such a strange premiere scheme. In an earnings call, Disney CEO Bob Chapek detailed the future of a delayed movie, Mulan. Initially premiering in theaters back in March, Mulan was repeatedly delayed because of the continued shutdown of movie theaters. Now, as the company is itching to finally launch it, Chapek announced a hybrid release for the film. Partly premiering in theater in safe countries, the film will also launch simultaneously on Disney+ for unsafe markets.

Now, here’s the catch: the film will cost US$ 29.99 for Disney+ users. Even if you have a subscription already, you have to fork over approximately PhP 1,474 to watch the new film. Of course, the hair trigger response is, “c’mon, Disney; stop haggling money from your customers.” And the response is right. However, there is so much more to this. Mulan can set the stage for an unprecedented era for Hollywood premieres.

Let’s get down to business

In New York, an average movie ticket costs around US$ 15 (approximately PhP 736). Mulan’s price tag is twice as much as a theater ticket. It’s even weightier in cheaper states and, most especially, in the Philippines (where movie tickets are only around US$ 5). Further, you’ll still need an active Disney+ account to access the film, costing an additional US$ 6.99.

(Naturally, it’s impossible to accurately translate the prices to an Asian market since Disney+ has not launched in all of Southeast Asia yet. We can only assume that Mulan’s streaming price is 200 percent of normal ticket prices, whatever it might be.)

Objectively, Mulan’s price is worse than a regular movie ticket. It’s easy to conclude the argument with this statement and head home. However, there is a way to justify the price.

The whole family plus your cow

Now, a single movie ticket typically admits one person. Buying Mulan pays for the streaming privilege which can typically include an entire family. With a 15-dollar average, two people watching the same Mulan purchase is already a break-even point. In the same vein, a family of four obtains double the value of the 30-dollar film price. Even better, a family can watch the film over and over again. And, as any parent who has a Frozen-loving child can tell you, unlimited playbacks is a blessing for your wallet (albeit a curse on your sanity).

Unfortunately, despite the mathematical mind-bending, Mulan’s price is still far from ideal. The movie-going experience is not the same on a streaming platform as in a cinema.

An assumption of equality

A cinema ticket is price of equality. Besides a few slight differences, everyone is paying for the same product. All other things considered equal, a 20-year old college student is paying and enjoying the same experience as a 50-year old CEO. Same film, same seat cushions, same facilities, same projector.

On the other hand, a streaming subscription cannot assume the same thing. A platform cannot control where and with what device a user will watch the movie from. A 20-year old college student watching the film on a laptop screen in a poorly lit dorm room is not enjoying the same experience as a 50-year old CEO watching the same thing in their high-end home theater with Dolby Atmos.

Likewise, the platform cannot assume how many people will watch the film in one purchase. Now, Mulan is a family film. Disney can easily assume that multi-person families will buy and watch the film. However, how will the audiences take the same price tag for a more polarized movie like Christopher Nolan’s Tenet or the next James Bond film?

All of Hollywood knows you’re here

In the same announcement, Chapek hints that Mulan’s price is just a “one-off.” Basically, other films might not follow the same pricing scheme. In a way, it makes sense. Mulan was made with a pre-coronavirus budget. It was expected to make millions from box office tickets. This might be the only way for Mulan to recoup its many losses. In the future, Disney might make films with lesser budgets and lesser expectations.

However, make no mistake; other filmmakers are intently watching Mulan’s performance on streaming. If Mulan succeeds, they can likely charge the same amount without incurring a lot of losses. That said, streaming premiere prices will likely vary from film to film. Even then, this isn’t the last discussion on the future of the film industry.

If the industry hopes to adapt to the new normal, it needs to rethink its strategy even further. Disney is offering only one solution for the problem of streaming. Unfortunately, the brand’s solution leverages a family-oriented release, one that might not appeal to the average moviegoer today.

A price worth fighting for

My suggestion: Implement a tiered premiere price. Not everyone will want to pay the full 30 dollars for a film they’re not wholly interested in. Most will watch it once and forget about it. Some won’t even care about watching it in HD.

Why not implement a pricing scheme based on those different preferences? For example, charge US$ 5 for a standard-definition, one-time playback premiere; US$ 10 for an HD, one-time playback premiere; US$ 20 for a standard-definition, unlimited playback premiere; and US$ 30 for an HD, unlimited playback premiere. In one swoop, a film can appeal to all streaming markets and needs.

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Get NBA League Pass with PLDT Home

It’s a whole new game!

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It’s a whole new game! The NBA is back and hoop junkies subscribed to PLDT Home are in for a treat!

PLDT Home subscribers can now conveniently access NBA games and exclusive programs live and on-demand for as low as PhP 485 per month by charging their NBA League Pass subscription to their existing PLDT Home account.

This offer comes as the NBA Restarts after being unceremoniously postponed due to the Coronavirus pandemic.Will LeBron and the Lakers make it all the way to the Finals? Can the Toronto Raptors repeat as Champions despite Kawhi Leonard heading to the Clippers? And can “The Greek Freak” Giannis Antetokounmpo cement his legacy by finally adding an NBA Championship to his resume? If you want to know, having NBA League Pass is the best way to follow the league.

NBA League Pass gives you access to the seeding games as well as the 2019-2020 NBA Playoffs with new statistical overlays, alternative audio, and multiple viewing options.

League Pass subscribers can watch in new camera angles, multiple in-language streams, influencer commentary, as well as in-depth analysis and live game stats. Viewers will also have the ability to impact visual effects and sounds in the venue through a “tap-to-cheer” function.

There’s also a 3-Game Choice that lets users watch up to three games of their choice per month.

To subscribe, visit pldthome.com/nbaleaguepass.

SEE ALSO: Kobe is the cover of NBA 2K21 Mamba Forever Edition

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Entertainment

The Emmys will be a virtual ceremony in 2020

Will they be in formals or pajamas?

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The 2020 Emmys Awards on Primetime will a fully-digital event to avoid public gathering amid a pandemic. The nominations were announced this week and Emmy executive producers, including host Jimmy Kimmel, sent a letter to key acting nominees informing them that this year’s ceremony will be virtual.

It also asked them to be prepared to participate from home or wherever they are. The Coronavirus pandemic has forced countries to announce lockdowns and curtail public gatherings to prevent further spread of the virus. The US alone has reported more than 4 million positive cases so far and the rising graph shows no sign of dropping.

Unlike the usual formal wear, the letter said, “If you want to be in formal wear, we’d love that, but equally if you’re in the UK and it’s 3 a.m., perhaps you want to be in designer pajamas and record from your bed!”

The letter added the organizers are assembling a top-notch team of technicians, producers, and writers to work closely with Jimmy Kimmel and invited guests, to make sure everyone can be filmed.

The Emmys can’t ignore the current circumstances and “we also acknowledge that our world is going through a challenging moment in many ways.”

A virtual award ceremony is a very modern concept and its implementation matters the most. TV viewership has spiked since work-from-home models got implemented in March, prompting people to seek out new shows and binge older ones. Reality award ceremonies are a dose of fresh content, bringing back some level of normalcy.

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