Camera Shootouts

OnePlus 5T vs OPPO R11s: Camera Shootout

Which phone has the better cameras?

Published

on

We are here, yet again. Months after the release of the OnePlus 5T and OPPO R11s, we are left scratching our heads at how much these two phones from supposedly different companies look so alike.

And now, the OnePlus 5T has a Lava Red version, too!

Of course, this isn’t the first time, this happened. These two phones’ predecessors, the OnePlus 5 and OPPO R11, also looked confusingly similar.

And so, I had to ask: Despite looking like absolute twinsies, how do the phones’ cameras perform against each other?

Quick specs

Both phones are equipped with dual-rear cameras: A 16- and 20-megapixel combo. Both phones have ditched using their secondary cameras for optical zoom capabilities and instead champion having two shooters with f/1.7 apertures — to shoot better in low-light situations, they claim.

It’s on the front-facing cameras where these two phones differ. The OnePlus 5T sports a 16-megapixel camera with an aperture of f/2.0 while the OPPO R11s is fitted with a 20-megapixel camera with the same f/2.0 aperture.

Now, on to the shootout!

Rear cameras

At first glance, there doesn’t seem to be a big difference between the two phones in terms of rear camera performance. In great lighting conditions, the OnePlus 5T and the OPPO R11s deliver great color and detailed photos.

As I used the two phones more, however, I noticed a slight difference with the photos they produce.

In very bright or extreme lighting conditions, the OnePlus 5T’s photos had higher contrast while the R11s’ photos were usually brighter in terms of exposure.

With HDR on, the OnePlus 5T did slightly better. This handset was better at balancing the bright sky background and the shadowy flower foreground. The flowers on the R11s sample were visibly darker and less detailed.

Colors come out almost the same — bright and punchy, but not too saturated as other smartphone cameras have been known to do. But, notice that the R11s’ shot is a tad warmer than the 5T’s photo.

This warmth on the R11s photos is more apparent in the photo above. Again, OPPO’s photos are more exposed, though in this case, that led to a lack of detail on this particular photo.

That R11s brightness works for some instances, however. In the pictures above, the brightness on the OPPO R11s photo worked as it made for a more vivid photo of the flowers.

In low-light settings, both devices do good, though we’ve seen other handsets perform better. Colors are brighter and more solid on the OnePlus 5T; its contrast settings work better for scenarios like this.

Portrait mode

The OnePlus 5T and the OPPO R11s both have portrait modes on their rear cameras. For the unfamiliar, this shooting mode just allows for a bokeh effect and slight face-filtering that ensures optimum photos.

On this mode, both devices did well. Bokeh cutouts looked good and natural. As expected and as observed from the other photos, the R11s had a higher exposure which meant less shadows on the face. There was also more airbrushing on the R11s photo with Joshua’s (the photo subject) freckles almost disappearing completely.

There’s also an extra setting on the R11s’ rear camera portrait mode that allows for a tighter portrait shot — I call this the “bust” or “full body” button. Toggling this will either crop into the photo like above, or give you a wider shot like the photo before that.

The same observations are applicable to this next portrait photo. Notice how smooth my skin is on the R11s picture — even golden hour’s great lighting wouldn’t have been able to get my skin to look that great!

Front-facing cameras

Now on to selfies!

This first selfie batch was taken with the beauty mode turned off.

Look closer and you’ll notice subtle differences. The R11s’ photo exposure make it seem like my face is brighter, and even without beauty mode, there seems to be subtle airbrushing done on my face. On both photos, you see the detail on my skin, though I’d say that the OnePlus 5T photo is more true to life — not that I’m happy about that fact.

It should be noted, though, that there is no bokeh mode available on the OnePlus 5T’s front-facing cameras. Alas, you have to deal with crappy backgrounds when you’re on this phone as you can’t blur them out.

It’s really on the beauty mode that these two phones differ. The OnePlus 5T does have a beauty mode contolled by a bar that you can toggle for intensity. The OPPO R11s, on the other hand, has beauty mode settings with choices from intensities one to six, and artificial intelligence-powered beauty mode when set to “Auto.”

The OnePlus 5T’s beauty mode is noticeably mild compared to the R11s’. Even on the highest setting, OnePlus’ filters weren’t as strong as some of OPPO’s. Although OPPO’s filters run the risk of too much smoothing and plastic-y skin, the improved AI-beauty mode has me impressed with natural-looking selfie results.

Even in group selfies, the same results carry over. Again, there is no bokeh or portrait mode on the OnePlus 5T’s selfie camera, which is a shame especially for group photos like above.

Verdict

While these two devices look confusingly similar, they are designed for two different markets. Aside from camera treatment, there are notable differences between two phones in terms of user experience (OnePlus uses OxygenOS which is near stock Android, while OPPO is on ColorOS which mimic’s Apple’s iOS) and specs (the OnePlus 5T uses a high-end Snapdragon 835 while the OPPO R11s uses a midrange Snapdragon 660 processor).

The OnePlus 5T, slapped with a flagship processor, is aimed at power users who look at utility and value for money as primary priorities. Even this phone’s lack of portrait or bokeh mode on the front-facing camera, if it’s any indication, shows how selfies just aren’t a priority on this device.

The OPPO R11s, on the other hand, sticks to the brand’s selfie roots. It caters to an audience that puts importance on selfies and beauty modes, even going as far as installing artificial intelligence on said beauty mode.


To be completely honest, there isn’t much of a difference in terms of picture quality between these two handsets. It all boils down to preference. Unless you’re very particular about your beauty modes, either phone would work for you.

In this particular case, the cameras aren’t a tie-breaker.

SEE ALSO: OnePlus 5 vs OPPO R11 shootout: Which has better cameras?

Camera Shootouts

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra vs iPhone 13 Pro Max: Camera Shootout

Do you need the best camera hardware to achieve desirable results?

Published

on

Remember when we did an in-depth camera shootout between Apple’s iPhone 13 Pro Max versus its 12 Pro Max counterpart? Well, we’re doing it again!

The new contender? It’s none other than Samsung’s Galaxy S22 Ultra with better camera hardware and software features.

Even though the iPhone 13 Pro Max was released four months earlier, it’s safe to say these two phones can go head-to-head against the odds of most users.

If you’re curious to find out which smartphone is the best for your “phonetography” needs, watch our Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra vs iPhone 13 Pro Max camera shootout now!

SEE ALSO: Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra vs Huawei P50 Pro: Camera Shootout

Continue Reading

Camera Shootouts

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra vs Huawei P50 Pro: Camera shootout

Can Huawei’s latest flagship phone keep up with the Samsung’s greatest Galaxy yet?

Published

on

By

The Huawei P50 Pro may not be a direct rival to the Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra in terms of camera hardware (that’s more the Galaxy S22+), but this is also a good chance to compare and see if Huawei’s latest flagship can keep up with the biggest brother in the whole Galaxy S22 lineup.

Ultra-Wide

The Galaxy S22 Ultra has a 13MP f/2.2 shooter while the P50 Pro has a 12MP UWA camera of the same aperture — albeit with difference in the overall focal length / angle.

#1

#2

#3

Wide

There’s a gap between the main cameras The S22 Ultra has a 108MP while the P50 Pro has a tad smaller 50MP camera — but both still having an f/1.8 aperture.

Can the smaller sensor keep up with the bigger one?

#4

#5

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

#6

#7

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

#8

Telephoto Zoom

For a fair and square fight, I only used the first telephoto camera of the Galaxy S22 Ultra versus the Huawei P50 Pro’s sole zoom lens.

#9

#10

#11

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

#12

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

#13

#14

#15

#16

#17

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

#18

#19

#20

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

Portrait Mode

When shooting in Portrait Mode, one smartphone uses its 3x Telephoto Zoom lens while the other sticks with its 50MP wide camera. But which is which?

#21

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

#22

Low-Light

Once the sunset is out, smartphones tend to change their AI algorithm in making low-light shots brighter but with less noise

#23 (Ultra-Wide)

#24 (Wide)

#25 (Zoom)

Night Mode

Unlike low-light photos taken using the Auto Mode, Night Mode is more suitable for making night shots pop with the right amount of highlights, shadows, and contrast altogether.

#26 (Ultra-Wide)

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

#27 (Wide)

#28 (Zoom)

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

BONUS: 10x Zoom

The Galaxy S22 Ultra has a dedicated 10x telephoto lens while the P50 Pro only relies on digital zoom and AI when zooming in on 10x.

#29

#30

Galaxy S22 Ultra P50 Pro

Results

Which are your top photo picks? It may already be obvious to some of you at the beginning but here are the results:

Photo A – Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra

Photo B – Huawei P50 Pro

Conclusion

Despite Huawei not making the P50 Pro+ variant, it’s still safe to say that this camera shootout between the top-tier flagship phones of each brand is still pretty close.

Samsung’s Galaxy S22 Ultra may have the better camera hardware out of the two, but it doesn’t mean that the P50 Pro is a slouch when it comes to camera performance.

As a matter of fact, it was able to keep up from day ’til night. If we’re looking at the specifics, the Galaxy S22 Ultra has a wider main camera whereas the P50 Pro has a wider ultra-wide camera. The difference in optical zoom lenses was also evident.

But in some shooting scenarios, the Galaxy S22 Ultra won especially when it comes to processing HDR (High Dynamic Range), sharpness and details, as well as overall exposure and contrast in most wide and zoomed shots.

And just like in my P50 Pro review, the AWB (Auto White Balance) when using Night Mode (or shooting in low-light for that matter) leans more into the warmer range of the spectrum whereas the Galaxy S22 Ultra is more on the cooler (or maybe neutral) one.

While my P50 Pro vs Galaxy S21 FE camera shootout looks more comprehensive with 60 photo sets, being able to show half in this camera comparison article still proves a point that the Huawei P50 Pro can keep up with Samsung’s latest and greatest smartphone yet.

SEE ALSO: Huawei P50 Pro vs Samsung Galaxy S21 FE: Camera shootout

Continue Reading

Camera Shootouts

Huawei P50 Pro vs Samsung Galaxy S21 FE: Camera shootout

The Korean versus Chinese turmoil reaches our camera shootout section

Published

on

By

2022 already started a bang with new smartphones such as the Samsung Galaxy S21 FE and the Huawei P50 Pro (well, internationally).

While this may not be the fairest camera comparison of them all due to some hardware differences that favor the P50 Pro over the S21 FE, I tried to be objective while still being meticulous when shooting the sample photos below.

Buckle up as I’ve prepared as much as 60 sets (yes, sixty) for you to nitpick. This might also be the longest camera comparison article in this site ever — unless there will be a more comprehensive one sooner 😉

Disclaimer: Just like our previous camera shootouts, photos were collaged, resized, and labeled for faster loading and preview. No other manipulations were applied.

Ultra-wide

On paper, they’re practically the same: P50 Pro is equipped with a 13MP sensor while the Galaxy S21 FE has a 12MP one. Both phones feature a FoV (Field of View) of 123-degree and an f/2.2 aperture. But which one is better at ultra-wide shots?

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

Telephoto Zoom

The P50 Pro might be ahead due to its 64MP f/3.5 periscope telescope zoom lens (up to 100x digitally), but for the sake of this comparison, we only used 3.5x zoom that favors both phones since the Galaxy S21 FE’s 8MP f/2.4 telephoto zoom lens starts at 3x optical.

#7

#8

#9

#10

#11

#12

HDR (High Dynamic Range)

Shooting against the light? Well, newer smartphones, chipsets, camera sensors, and optics should be able to enhance and improve the overall quality of an image unlike how phones try to capture and process it during the past few years. We’ll also see here if P50 Pro’s 50MP f/1.8 main sensor has an edge over the 12MP f/1.8 camera of the Galaxy S21 FE.

#13 (Wide)

#14 (Ultra-Wide)

#15 (Wide)

#16 (Wide)

#17 (3.5x Zoom)

#18 (3.5x Zoom)

Auto White Balance (AWB)

Admit it or not, most of us prefer warmer photos over the cooler shots to add warmth and drama. But sometimes, the”cooler” ones are what we see in real life.

#19 (3.5x Zoom)

#20 (3.5x Zoom)

#21 (Ultra-wide)

#22 (Wide)

#23 (Ultra-wide)

#24 (Wide)

#25 (Ultra-wide)

#26 (Wide)

#27 (Indoor)

Saturation

Do you like ’em too colorful or just bland? Regardless, this gives another hint which phone is actually better that might make (or break) your purchasing decision.

#28 (Ultra-wide)

#29 (3.5x zoom)

#30 (3.5x zoom)

#31

#32

#33

#34 (3.5x zoom)

Food

You were already spoiled by how each phone performs in saturation and AWB (Auto White Balance). Now, let’s apply those algorithms in food shots.

#35

#36 (3.5x zoom)

#37 (3.5x zoom)

#38 (3.5x zoom)

#39 (3.5x zoom)

#40

#41 (3.5x zoom)

Portraits & Selfies

While preferential, being able to preserve the right amount of skin color and face details are better. Brighter photos don’t actually mean they’re better (at least IMO). If you’re curious about the specifics, the P50 Pro has a 13MP f/2.4 punch-hole camera while the S21 FE is equipped with a larger 32MP f/2.2 shooter.

#42

#43

#44 (Ultra-wide selfie)

#45 (Ultra-wide selfie)

#46

#47

#48 (Ultra-wide selfie)

Night Mode

Finally! My favorite part of this shootout. Different phone brands have different night mode processing algorithms. Which phone do you think is better in this category?

#49 (30x zoom)

#50 (Ultra-wide)

#51

#52 (3.5x zoom)

#53

#54

#55

#56

#57

#58

#59

#60

Results

Do you like your picks? Well, here’s the final result for all photos:

Photo A: Huawei P50 Pro

Photo B: Samsung Galaxy S21 FE

Conclusion

Hands down, the cameras of the Huawei P50 Pro performed better in most situations. But considering the Galaxy S21 FE is “underpowered” in terms of camera hardware with lesser number of sensors and megapixel count, I’ll still give props to how it was able to produce photos that can compete (and sometimes beat) the P50 Pro.

That being said, the obvious downside of the rear cameras of the Galaxy S21 FE is none other than its cooler temperature / lesser saturation despite Samsung’s Scene Optimizer being on all of the time. If there’s one thing to consider that’s better is that it has en even wider ultra-wide lens over the P50 Pro.

The P50 Pro doesn’t do much justice in sceneries and pitch black nightscapes (TMI, I didn’t show any comparison of this one because P50 Pro always results to a dark image).

Moreover, the P50 Pro produced more of the accurate shots but sometimes, its AI mode does some over-processing in certain situations such as awkwardly-lit night shots, greenery, and food. This results to warmer, more saturated shots that are not based on reality.

While these problems can be corrected through color-grading software such as Lightroom, VSCO, and Snapseed, most people still post their photos straight out of the gallery.

Night mode shots are also better despite just capturing the photos below 1 second (more like 0.9 seconds). Whereas the Galaxy S21 FE resulted to darker and grainier photos even if it takes around 2~4 seconds to finish a shot minus the time it takes to process the final shot.

We shouldn’t forget that the arrival of the Galaxy S22 series is coming real soon. We may not be able to test a more extensive camera comparison with the recently launched S21 FE, but who knows? There might just be another P50 Pro camera shootout waiting to battle the upcoming Galaxy once we have our hands on it.

SEE ALSO: 

Huawei P50 Pro review: 5 topnotch cameras, 5 drawbacks

Samsung Galaxy S21 FE 5G review: An all around wonder

Continue Reading

Trending