Connect with us

Features

Persona 5’s developer doesn’t want you doing this — it’s nonsense

Published

on

50 hours into Persona 5, I’ve been having a great time getting to know its cast of stylish teenage misfits and conquering the twisted psychological palaces of bad adults. It’s just baffling that Atlus, the company behind this JRPG gem, doesn’t want me to share screenshots and video clips of my experience. Not easily, at the very least.

Atlus put in heavy restrictions for the average gamer on what can be shared about Persona 5. The game is out exclusively on Sony consoles, the PlayStation 3 and the PlayStation 4. The latter platform has built-in social features, allowing users to take screenshots, record videos up to 15 minutes long, or broadcast live to streaming services such as YouTube Gaming and Twitch. Apart from the intro screens and the brief opening moments of the game, all this sharing functionality is disabled for the rest of Persona 5.

Dedicated streamers who use external hardware to capture and broadcast footage of the game aren’t free from constraints. According to the official statement put out by Atlus USA, those who plan on posting videos are limited to showing only 90-minute chunks among other rules. Those live streaming the game are strongly warned to not exhibit anything past a specific point in the game’s story. Doing so risks video takedowns and account suspensions. All these restraints are for containing spoilers, supposedly.

This is a picture I had to take with my phone because the PS4’s sharing features were disabled

Never mind the fact that the game has been out in Japan since September of last year, and that spoilers will always be easily found online when you go looking for them. Forget the emotional benefits game makers and fans get from shared experiences. I just have to consider my own time trying to cover the game for a review without the help of a capture device to declare that this sucks.

I’m either frantically reaching for my smartphone to snap a picture of a funny line of dialogue before the scene advances, or I’m looking through my phone’s relatively small, dark, and low-res screen while playing instead of my optimally lit Full HD monitor in anticipation of a screenshot-worthy image. Either way, the result is subpar, and I’m distracted from actually playing. This wouldn’t be the case at all if I were able to simply get a screenshot from the PS4 by pressing the SHARE button on my controller.

Another picture I took with my smartphone’s camera thanks to Persona 5’s restrictions

Adding to the frustration is that this limitation is dripping with irony given the presence and importance of technology in the world of Persona 5.

As the first game in the series that has come out in the 2010’s, Persona 5 is as modern as it gets. Your friends and confidants are constantly in touch via chat through your smartphone. The Phantom Thieves, your ragtag group of psyche vigilantes, gain public support through the aptly named online message board “Phan-Site.” There, followers share their love for the gang, as well as info that might lead to potential targets. The fictional hacker collective “Medjed” figure into the story as a global cyber threat. The very method by which you infiltrate the dungeons of the antagonists’ minds is through a mysterious GPS-like app on your phone called the Metaverse Navigator.

There’s even this fancy new feature called the “Thieves Guild,” which is basically the worldwide network of Persona 5 players. It shows percentages of what all the other players do with their time on in-game days, so you can get live tips on how you can better optimize your character’s busy schedule. It also shows the answers they choose for the random questions you get from teachers while your character is in class. The Thieves Guild is essentially a handy cheat sheet that brings the Persona gaming community closer!

Here’s an actual screenshot I got from the opening cutscene

And there’s also the undeniable feeling of rebellion throughout the game, of breaking free from the shackles of society, and of teenagers sticking it to the man.

These story and design choices are all so very now, especially in this tumultuous social climate. By locking down the simple act of sharing, Atlus undermines the contemporary, free-spirited, and always-connected message of Persona 5, revealing just how short-sighted, narrow-minded, and old-fashioned the company can be.

SEE ALSO: 5 must-have Nintendo Switch games that aren’t Zelda

Camera Shootouts

Flagship Smartphone Camera Shootout: Best of 2017

Find out which premium smartphone comes out on top

Published

on

The iPhone X, Pixel 2, Mate 10 Pro, and Galaxy Note 8 — they may all look different, but they share one important feature: an excellent set of cameras.

Join us as we compare photos taken by each of these flagship smartphones around Indonesia and Singapore. Which shooter comes out on top? Watch and find out!

Continue Reading

Features

Dyson V8 Carbon Fibre cordless vacuum hands-on

The future of housekeeping

Published

on

Made a mess? Dyson’s got you.

The V8 Carbon Fibre, the newest addition to Dyson’s renowned cordless vacuum line, has just been launched in Southeast Asia.

The new cleaning device utilizes the same technology from previous Dyson innovations, which ensures optimum performance of this lean, mean, cleaning machine. Certain features — like a better battery and a more powerful engine — are improved on this new vacuum release.

Dyson engineer Sam Twist explains what the V8 Carbon Fibre can do

Dyson engineer Sam Twist explains what the V8 Carbon Fibre can do

At the launch in Bangkok, Thailand, I got to go hands-on with the device. Quite literally, I made a mess and cleaned it up with the V8 Carbon Fibre. Here are some initial observations:

Easy to handle

What amazed me most is how intuitive this device is. There was no learning curve. I picked it up for the first time, pulled a trigger that’s perfectly positioned in the area where my hand goes, and voila, I was vacuuming!

Now, call me uninformed on the workings of a vacuum (and general housekeeping) but I always thought vacuums were heavy. At least I didn’t expect something with this power to be as light as it was.

Like their Supersonic hairdryer, the V8 Carbon Fibre is ergonomically balanced. Simply put, it’s designed in a way that ensures easier handling.

Power!

This engine, tiny and light as it is, isn’t just a load of hot air (pun intended).

This device has 30 percent more suction power than its predecessors. That capability was shown off in a curious exhibition, one that entailed a vacuum-sealed container and some water. Yep, this vacuum sucks, in the best possible way.

This device tests the vaccum’s suction power! You can see the water rising as the device is turned on.

From corn chips to oregano, sprinkles to baking soda; we tried the vacuum and another Isa-made mess was averted.

Leave no dirt in sight

And, if the newly cleaned surface isn’t enough proof for you, you can just take a gander at the dirt you’ve picked up in the vacuum’s compartment.

This machine runs on an improved battery that’s capable of 40 minutes of non-stop, cord-free cleaning on low mode.

Very versatile

Aside from the fact that it’s a pretty capable machine, this thing also works well on different surfaces and different scenarios.

Different Dyson-engineered heads allow for cleaning a variety of textured spaces. There’s a tool specifically designed for carpets, hardwood floors, mattresses, and even one for “mess-free dog grooming!” Various accessories also mean that you can modify your vacuum specifically for the spot you want to clean — imagine a multi-angle brush attachment that allows you to clean hard to reach areas.

An added feature is that these vacuums have a wall-mounted charging dock, which is the most convenient thing. I’m definitely reserving a spot for this device in my future hypothetical high-tech house!

Now, these are just my initial thoughts on the V8 Carbon Fibre, but it’s enough to get me excited over vacuuming — who would’ve thought?

Quite honestly, I’ve never really enjoyed cleaning up my messes, but this thing might just change that.

The Dyson V8 Carbon Fibre will retail for PhP 47,500 in the Philippines starting February 21. It will be available in Thailand come March.

SEE ALSO: Dyson Supersonic review: Bladeless hair dryer

Continue Reading

CES 2018

Episode 001: Getting lost at the world’s largest tech show

Published

on

In this first epidose of GadgetMatch Podcast we talk about the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show (CES 2018) which just wrapped up in Las Vegas. Michael Josh and Isa share behind the scenes challenges of covering the world’s largest tech show. And the team talks about the most attention grabbing tech from the show including an entire range of Artificial Intelligence and Google Assistant gadgets, Vivo’s new phone with an in-display fingerprint sensor, Sony’s new robot dog, and Razer’s Project Linda.

Continue Reading

Trending