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Samsung: ‘We’re more secure than any other brand’

Your data is safe

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The digital age ushered an era where cybersecurity issues pose a threat to our personal safety and big risks in businesses and the economy. As if the world isn’t cruel, violent, and scary enough, we’re all forced to stay on our toes and double up our guard.

Several data breaches and news about tech companies spying on us has been alarming to say the least. “Is our data still safe?” is the common question among concerned individuals.

Recently, the CxO Innovation Summit 2019 — a data and security conference held by VST-ECS Philippines — was mounted in Boracay. GadgetMatch had an exclusive interview with executives from Samsung Global and Samsung Philippines.

Samsung’s series of unfortunate events

In a press conference, Samsung discussed its attempts to protect its consumers’ data. Samsung recently faced a series of unfortunate mishaps concerning security and privacy, causing concerns among its loyal customers.

Samsung Mobile B2B Asia’s Corporate VP and Chief Revenue Officer David Kim stated how Samsung isn’t the only one that suffered from malicious attacks. He reiterated how the company uses Knox as a security measure along with its authentication factor. Kim explained, “You can only control the hardware, software, and who access the phones.”

The executive added, “There are also Wi-Fi and networks. If someone can sneak in your network, they can sneak in your email.”

Samsung believes they’re more secure than any other brand. Kim confidently claimed to GadgetMatch, “We don’t have a perfect security rating, but we are well received. That’s why the White House is comfortable with us.”

Amidst the issues surrounding the company, Samsung also took pride in how they’re one of the few companies that organically make their hardware components and develop their software.

Knox makes the difference

Samsung’s Product Manager Anton Andres supported the claims, stating how Samsung’s Knox sets them apart. “The main difference is the Knox platform. It has two components: Platform security and the solutions we offer in the market like Knox Manage and Knox Configure.”

The young executive demonstrated, “Knox Platform is embedded on a smartphone. At first, it was just a security platform that automatically encrypts and decrypts information every time you boot up the device.”

Andres further explained how the Knox Platform has multi-layers of security. “First is the hardware chip. If a device — like a Samsung Galaxy S8 — was compromised and reset, Knox automatically blows the fuse.”

“If you have corporate or personal info, your data is automatically wiped, preventing any data leakage and security risks.”

Be careful of what you download

Similar to Huawei’s warnings, Andres warned about downloading third-party apps and keyboards. Though it may customize your keyboard to your liking, it can compromise your security. Andres believes the challenge is the keyboard loggers, which sends your credentials to third-party servers every time you put your credentials.

“If you access your mobile banking credentials on a third-party keyboard, they can phish your information,” Andres said. “With Samsung Knox, we identify specific applications and URLs. Once identified, Knox automatically hides your information to prevent potential threats.”

Currently, Samsung is constantly updating the Knox Platform and its security solutions. Recently, the Samsung Galaxy A50s highlighted Knox. The Korean company is also looking for more ways to make Knox easily understandable for everyday consumers. Presently, the Knox Platform is limited to Samsung devices while Knox Solutions are compatible with Android, Windows, and iOS.

SEE ALSO: Huawei: ‘We do not touch data’

Enterprise

Lee Kun-hee, the titan behind Samsung’s rise, dies at 78

South Korea’s richest person

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Lee Kun-hee, the tech titan who transformed Samsung into a technology powerhouse, died at the age of 78. Samsung said Mr Lee died on Sunday with family by his side, but did not state the exact cause of death.

“All of us at Samsung will cherish his memory and are grateful for the journey we shared with him,” the company’s said in a statement. His family will hold a private funeral.

He was South Korea’s richest person with Bloomberg Billionaire Index estimating his net worth to be US$ 20.7 billion. When Lee took over the company, it was already a massive conglomerate. But its stake in the electronics sector wasn’t dominant. Lee made the electronics division a priority, changing the face of the brand forever.

Today, the company has an interest in every possible segment of technology. Samsung is one of the world’s top smartphone makers, has a state-of-the-art fabrication production lineup, and quite literally sells everything. From refrigerators to insurance, Samsung does everything.

His son Jay Y. Lee has been the conglomerate’s de facto leader since his father’s hospitalization due to a heart attack in 2014. Lee stepped down as Samsung chairman in 2008 after he was charged with tax evasion and embezzlement. But suspended sentences meant he never served time in jail and he received two presidential pardons.

Furthermore, Lee is also credited for successful efforts to secure the 2018 Winter Olympics, which were held in South Korea. The cause of his death is unknown and the company did not confirm whether he’s left a will.

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Samsung is officially developing a 10000ppi display

Currently in research phase

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How many pixels can you see on your screen right now? With screen technology today, you probably can’t see where one pixel ends and another starts. Of course, some devices today still have easily discernable pixels even on a large screen. That said, screen technology is about to get a massive boost. Samsung is officially developing a 10000ppi display.

Partnering with Stanford University, the South Korean tech company is packing in the titanic amount in a single screen, a mouth-watering improvement on today’s standards. Currently, a smartphone can only pack in 400 to 500 pixels per inch. A larger TV screen only goes for 100 to 200 pixels per inch.

Usually, different pixels emit red, green, and blue light, mixing all three to create vibrant colors. In Samsung’s new screen, OLED films can emit white light through reflections. As you might expect, the pixels are much smaller than normal, allowing Samsung to pack in as much as it can into the screen.

Thankfully, you don’t have to worry about grabbing the new feature on your phone or TV set just yet. The screen’s developers predict the technology’s earliest application in the virtual reality industry.

Currently, VR headsets are still woefully inadequate in pixels. Using a VR screen is still too much like staring at a screen up close. With 10,000 pixels per inch, a VR headset in the future might looks as good as the real thing. Moreover, it can even go beyond VR headsets. The study itself names “glasses or contact lenses” as potential applications.

Regardless of when it comes, the future is looking good, real or virtual.

SEE ALSO: Watch smarter on Samsung’s TU8000 Crystal UHD TVs

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PayPal and Venmo will now accept cryptocurrencies

Good news for Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Ethereum

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PayPal has announced it’ll let users transact via cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Litecoin, Ethereum, and more. Now users can buy, hold, and pay using cryptocurrencies on the online wallet and payments platform.

Using its leverage across tens of millions of merchants, PayPal can help bitcoin and rival cryptocurrencies gain wider adoption as a viable payment method. PayPal has almost 350 million users worldwide along with 26 million merchants.

PayPal owned Venmo will also let users make peer-to-peer cryptocurrency transactions and a general rollout is scheduled for the first half of 2021. Following the announcement, the value of Bitcoin surged by 5 percent on the same day.

The company says it’ll initially support Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, Litecoin, and Ethereum. Behind the scenes, Paxos will handle the trading as well as custody. For users, the biggest benefit will be they can store their cryptocurrency with PayPal and won’t have to go through real time exchange before each payment.

All cryptocurrencies will be first converted to fiat currency (like US$) at the time of settlement. Access to the service will be available in the coming weeks. However, users won’t be able to pay until early 2021.

PayPal isn’t the first major company to adopt crypto payments. Mobile payments provider Square as well as trading service Robinhood Markets already support cryptocurrencies. But PayPal’s reach is considered to be massive, having a ripple effect on the whole industry.

In the second quarter, PayPal processed payments worth a whopping US$ 222 billion. Hence it’s adoption of cryptocurrency goes a long way in supporting the niche industry.

Bitcoin and many other virtual currencies have been around for a long time, but exposure to retail customers for general payments has been close to zero. These currencies are extremely volatile, making them perfect for traders and short-term investors. Although their inherent benefits are yet to reach the average Joe.

With one of the world’s largest fintech institution opening doors for virtual coins, the future looks optimistic for increased adoption.

Read Also: Basics of cryptocurrency: Risks and benefits

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