Enterprise

UK could allow Huawei to build its 5G network

The US isn’t going to be pleased

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Huawei has been at the center of the ongoing US-China trade war and has been barred from selling its phones and 5G equipment in the US. Due to security concerns, the US has also tried to influence its allies in a bid to sideline the Chinese company.

However, the US’s closest ally, the UK might look the other way. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is preparing to allow Huawei equipment in certain parts of the country’s next-generation networks.

Senior sources in Whitehall and the security services say the government is moving towards a decision that will see Huawei allowed access to the “non-contentious” parts of the network.

The US has refused to cooperate with Huawei in the construction of its 5G networks citing spying concerns and urged all its allies to follow suit. Though some countries, including Germany and France, have turned a deaf ear to Washington’s pressure.

An earlier report also suggested that all four of the UK’s largest carriers — EE, O2, Three and Vodafone, were using Huawei gear in their 5G networks. A few months back, previous Prime Minister Theresa May made a similar decision and sparked a cabinet crisis. The decision was ultimately revoked and witnessed the end of her term.

No formal decision has been announced, and the cabinet is expected to meet within the next five weeks to finalize the ruling. Experts see the decision as a diplomatic tactic to snub the US amid a deteriorating relationship between the two countries.

Similarly, even India let Huawei demo its 5G equipment early this month. Experts say Huawei has a considerable edge in 5G deployment due to its massive investment in research and development. Barring Huawei would mean delaying 5G deployment by at least two years since all other alternatives are nascent at this point.

Enterprise

UK will allow Huawei to build 5G network

With a few exceptions

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Huawei and “banning” have become so synonymous today. Every headline practically begs the question: Who will ban Huawei next? When will Huawei catch a break?

To those following the entire saga, Huawei is already on the cusp of a much-needed breakthrough. Several countries are still on the fence regarding the Chinese company. The international outlook isn’t as bleak as the American one makes it seem.

Today, one of those ambivalent countries has made a decision. After meeting with the country’s National Security Council, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has allowed Huawei into its 5G network industry. The development comes after Brussels has reportedly made the same decision as well. (Belgium has not issued an official statement regarding its decision yet.)

Regardless of the initiating country, Johnson’s decision is conclusive. Like a stack of dominos, the world’s 5G industry is falling into place, in favor of Huawei. Naturally, no one wants to feel left out. “We want world-class connectivity as soon as possible,” British Digital Secretary Nicky Morgan said.

“But this must not be at the expense of our national security,” he continued. Despite the favorable decision, the UK remains vigilant regarding potential cybersecurity risks. Though allowed in the country, Huawei cannot touch the country’s “most sensitive networks.” These will likely include networks that specialize in transferring official information.

Previously, the country was on an on-and-off relationship with the Chinese company. For some moments, the UK considered a favorable decision from the get-go. For others, you noticed their warier side. Regardless, Huawei has landed a significant blow against America’s crusade against Huawei integration.

The US is still adamantly warning nations against adopting Huawei, encouraging them to implement bans just as they did. The country has even threatened to disconnect from countries that allow Huawei in. With the UK’s decision, will the US keep enforcing its iron fist against Huawei’s technology?

SEE ALSO: UK Prime Minister caught using a Huawei P20

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Enterprise

Vietnam’s Viettel develops its own 5G equipment

5G rollout in Vietnam imminent

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The race to 5G is on. Vietnam’s leading carrier, Viettel, just developed its own 5G equipment for use in the country’s transition towards the next-gen cellular service.

Vietnam becomes the sixth globally to develop its own 5G technology. Other countries that built homegrown infrastructure are Sweden’s Ericsson and Finland’s Nokia. Viettel’s development of its own 5G equipment makes it one of the few tech companies to have such capability.

Many countries in Southeast Asia, including the Philippines, are using Huawei infrastructure to launch their 5G service. Vietnam’s resistance to partnering with Huawei stems from its territorial dispute with Beijing over South China Sea.

The carrier will start the rollout in larger cities initially in June. Viettel also intends to use 5G equipment from Nokia for the initial rollout.

In the future, Viettel is looking to supply 5G equipment to its subsidiary carriers in countries like Myanmar and Cambodia. While some may interpret this as the carrier’s potential entry to the competitive 5G equipment market, it has to pay patent royalties owed to Huawei, Ericsson, and other companies.

Vietnam’s rollout of its homegrown 5G equipment is a clear break from other countries willing to pay tech companies for such. Since the Vietnamese government owns it, the carrier will subsidize the full rollout of 5G in the country.

Elsewhere, other countries are scrutinizing tech companies since 5G is a critical infrastructure that is supposed to be free from interference. Huawei has faced an entity ban in American soil over spying concerns regarding its own 5G equipment.

The Chinese company is also facing a similar ban in other countries, but it breathed a sigh of relief last October when the UK reconsidered Huawei for its own 5G rollout.

Source: Nikkei Asian Review

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Dell taking concrete steps towards sustainability, inclusivity

With the help of digital data

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Once in a while, tech companies unveil their roadmaps to orient their mission, vision, and goals into the future. Peering into roadmaps, however, is not enough. Tech companies also need to fulfill their objectives and ensure progress at every step of the way.

Only then will they make progress a reality by ensuring concrete steps to the future.

For Dell, making progress a reality is a matter of listing down bold agenda. As part of its “Progress Made Real” campaign, the company has unveiled three innovative goals it will accomplish by 2030. The company hopes its moonshot goals will drive responsibility and innovation while making societal impact.

Here are Dell’s goals as part of its campaign.

Advancing sustainability

Dell is following the general trend of most companies in reducing carbon footprint and using recyclables with its products. Unlike most companies, however, the company stated concrete goals by 2030 that will make it accountable to the planet.

One of those is recycling an equivalent product for every Dell product a customer buys. Now that’s a bold goal — but necessary if the world will eliminate e-waste. Elsewhere, Dell is also announcing the start of a circular economy by making products from recycled or renewable materials.

That goal is not just an empty promise — after all, Dell already started using bamboo packaging on its XPS 13 laptops.

What remains to be seen, however, is the company’s commitment to 100 percent recycled or renewable materials in all its packaging.

Cultivating inclusion

Part of Dell’s goals for 2030 is ensuring gender inclusivity in its workplace. As such, the company wants 50 percent of its global workforce and 40 percent of global managers to be women.

According to Ronnie Latinazo — Dell’s country manager for the Philippines — the country comes ahead of this goal with 45 percent of the workplace comprised of women.

Country Manager Ronnie Latinazo discussing the future of Dell’s technologies

By 2030, Dell wants 95 percent of its workers educated yearly on issues regarding unconscious bias, harassment, micro-aggression, and privilege. Such a bold goal is sorely needed at a time when more cases of sexual abuse are being uncovered every year.

The company is not lagging on these goals as it already took the first steps with its annual women empowerment summit, which inspires women in the workplace to do more and go the extra mile.

Shaping an ethical company

Establishing a company with ethics at its core means transforming the lives of many people and respecting fundamental human rights. Dell hopes to achieve 75 percent worker participation in charitable giving and community volunteerism. With the help of digital data, the company will make it easier to measure and monitor sustainable living goals for more than a billion people on the planet.

Privacy, as one of the fundamental human rights, remains a top priority for the company’s 2030 goals. By fully automating data control processes and making it easier to access customer’s data, Dell hopes to lead the way when it comes to digital privacy in the 21st century and beyond.

To ensure fulfillment of these goals, the company partnered with its workers, customers, and third-parties in fine-tuning and making progress towards these a reality.

Unveiling a streamlined PowerOne system

Along with making progress in sustainability and inclusivity, Dell is pushing ahead with the expansion of its cloud products designed for business managing dedicated data centers.

Dell recently launched its PowerOne infrastructure, which automates every step in creating and managing a data server for cloud deployment. As such, IT professionals will spend lesser time figuring out how to make software work to ensure smooth operations.

PowerOne is fully automated and uses Kubernetes and Ansible as its back-end technology. It is made up of other singular components such as PowerEdge, PowerMax, PowerSwitch, and PowerProtect. Gone are the days when businesses need to purchase these components individually since they can buy PowerOne to take care of everything.

“We believe that PowerOne would be a game-changer in the industry because it is the first autonomous infrastructure in the market,” said Ronnie Latinazo.

To know more about PowerOne, head to Dell EMC’s site for more information.

Making progress a reality

Dell is facing a challenging decade ahead as it unveils its goals towards a sustainable and inclusive future. With a plethora of options to choose from, the company is ensuring it will be the customers’ go-to brand for everyday computing and professional needs.

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