Reviews

Xiaomi Redmi 5 Plus (Redmi Note 5) Review

New face, familiar performance

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Xiaomi’s latest budget offering finally arrived in our office and I used it as my daily driver to see if it lives up to its hype. We all know Xiaomi offers the best specs to price ratio, but is the Redmi 5 Plus (known as the Redmi Note 5 in India) the new budget phone king?

The Redmi 5 Plus is all about its new 5.99-inch 18:9 display

Embracing the latest tall display trend

It’s supposed to be a “near-borderless” phone but the bezels are still quite thick

The chin is thicker than the forehead

On top of the phone are the audio port, secondary microphone, and IR blaster

Xiaomi sticks with infrared for controlling appliances

At the bottom are the aging micro-USB port and loudspeakers

When will Xiaomi shift to USB-C for their budget phones?

The power button and volume rocker are on the right side

Both have the same texture, so you’ll have to get familiar with them

The card tray on the left is a hybrid slot for nano-SIM and microSD cards

You can’t have the best of both worlds

The back houses the fingerprint sensor and primary camera along with the LED flash

The back is reminiscent of the predecessors

MIUI 9 is at the helm but still based on Nougat

The UI looks great on the longer display

Redmi embraces the new display ratio

Last year, we saw the trend of tall displays. The new 18:9 standard was not exclusive to the bezel-less flagships, as we have seen them even with midrange phones — then to budget devices. It’s expected that other budget-centric brands like Xiaomi will release their own for the masses, and that gave birth to the Redmi 5. The one we have here is the Plus variant which has a bigger IPS LCD with wide-viewing angles and good color reproduction.

I see Xiaomi as the pioneer of bezel-less phones with the Mi Mix, but they had to make some cuts to keep it within the range of Redmi phones. So, the Redmi 5 Plus still has some bezels all around the display. It’s noticeable that the bottom bezel or the chin is slightly thicker than the top.

As mentioned earlier, the back of the phone looks and feels like its predecessor. The front might look different thanks to the 18:9 display ratio and reduced bezels, but the back is oddly similar. If we are to compare the Redmi 5 Plus to the Redmi Note 4, the latter will just look stouter. The rear camera placement is the same, as well as the LED flash and fingerprint reader. Even the mixed aluminum and plastic build sports the same trick for seamless mixing.

The upgrade is mostly external

The real specs upgrade for the Redmi 5 series is found on the Redmi 5 Note Pro — not on this one. The Redmi 5 Plus (or Redmi 5 Note) is virtually identical to its predecessor with the same Snapdragon 625 processor, up to 4GB of memory, and up to 64GB of storage. Our review unit has the highest-end configuration with 4GB and 64GB of memory and storage, respectively. While the Snapdragon 625 is an efficient chipset, it’s already showing signs of aging.

The processor powering the phone was released back in 2016, and it’s been well-received especially on budget devices from Xiaomi. But with all the extra features that apps are getting, the phone might not be able to keep up for long. For instance, it’s a bit laggy when posting videos or Boomerang clips on Instagram Stories, and I’m getting longer waiting times when opening certain games. Software optimization could address these issues, though.

When it comes to gaming, you shouldn’t worry. The usual mobile games I play like Asphalt Extreme and NBA 2K18 ran fine even on high settings, but you’ll have to turn off some extra effects to get better frame rates. General phone use was also good with little to no hiccups.

The phone runs MIUI 9 out of the box but still based on Android 7.1 Nougat. While I can’t hate MIUI because of its speed and additional features on top of stock Android, it can get quite cumbersome at times with settings and permissions. MIUI 9 is a refinement of everything the MIUI team learned from previous versions and it’s still as colorful as before. There’s no news if it’ll get an update to Android 8.0 Oreo, but with MIUI 9 at the helm, it doesn’t really matter since you already have most of the new Android features and important security patches.

Typical Xiaomi-grade camera

Even with their flagship devices, Xiaomi can’t pull off superb quality shooters. So, what should we expect from their budget phones like the Redmi 5 Plus? The phone is equipped with a 12-megapixel primary shooter accompanied by a dual-tone LED flash. According to spec sheets, the aperture of the lens is just f/2.2 which is disappointing and it shows when shooting in dim environments. Night shots are also just so-so, so don’t expect the phone to capture plenty of details.

As for selfies, there’s a 5-megapixel front shooter that has the usual Xiaomi beauty effect that somehow doesn’t work well with my face, so I turned it off most of the time. It’s also not as wide as other selfie phones.

One thing I like about Xiaomi’s camera is its launcher. It’s pretty straightforward and simple. There are also a few modes you can jump into if you want to get the best possible shot depending on the subject.

Longevity is where the phone triumphs

Battery life is perhaps the most important aspect of an entry-level phone. If you’re sticking to a budget, you might not get the best camera but it should at least last the whole day on a single charge. With a 4000mAh battery, the Redmi 5 Plus can.

After using the phone as my daily driver for more than a week, I rarely looked for the charger. I don’t even worry about running out of juice while on the road. Based on actual usage, the phone can last for more than 24 hours with about eight hours of screen-on time. On a really busy day, the phone can do around 20 hours. If you’re wondering, my usage is all about mobile data. I connect to Wi-Fi from time to time when in the office and at home, but LTE is my savior when in public places.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

If you’re a Redmi fan looking for an upgrade, you might want to skip this one. The true upgrade is found on the Redmi Note 5 Pro with its latest processor and familiar-looking rear cameras. If still available, you can opt for the good old Redmi Note 4 which is supposedly cheaper now with the new releases in the market.

Honestly, it’s disappointing to see Xiaomi recycling their design for the budget series. The Redmi 5 Plus doesn’t bring anything new to the table even with its 18:9 display. But, that could have been the point of the phone all along since they released the Redmi Note 5 Pro shortly after.

The Redmi 5 Plus starts at CNY 999 or around US$ 150 for the base 3GB/32GB model, while the top-of-the-line 4GB/64GB variant sells for CNY 1,299 or about US$ 180. You can purchase the Redmi 5 Plus just like the one we have from GearBest.

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Honor Band 5 Review: Reliable fitness companion

Counting steps was fun!

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We went hiking with the Honor Band 5 and I learned a few things about hiking, the fitness wearable, and myself — which is mostly just about how generally unfit I am.

The hike took place at Masungi Georeserve. It’s a conservation area in the Philippines that’s about 47 kilometers away from Metro Manila. One of the staff told us that during the prehistoric era, the entire reserve was submerged in water. Millions of years later, it’s now a mountain range inhabited by different species of plants, insects, and animals. Fun!

A view of a section of Masungi Georeserve

Unlike other trek sites, the Masungi Georeserve is  more… tamed. The rangers have built a path for curious hikers but if, like me, you have zero experience trekking or hiking, then don’t think for a second that this is going to be easy.

You need to have the right gear

The thing about having fitness goals (or just goals in general, really) are they need to be measurable for you to know your progress. With the Honor Band 5 slapped on my wrist, I was excited to find out several things but I didn’t expect to learn as much as I did when the hike wrapped up. More on this later.

MJ showing he has all the right gear for the hike

Another proper gear you need to take note of is your shoes. Just as there’s a pair meant for running, playing basketball, and training, there are also shoes made specifically for hiking.

I went out of my way to get a pair prior to the hike and it made a huge difference. I had a relatively easier time going through the terrain than some of the people I went with who wore regular running or training sneakers. This meant I had one less thing to worry about.

Getting started

Before we started, we first set up the Honor Band 5. To do so, you’ll need to download the Huawei Health app. Through the app you can see all your metrics as well as update the firmware and download more watch faces.

There were a variety of watch faces. They ranged from simple ones that just show you the time and the number of steps you’ve taken to those that showed the time, steps, and even heart rate.

For this particular trek, I wanted to check on my heart rate. I was happy to know it was still beating despite multiple failed romantic pursuits. In fact, it spiked more than I thought it would during the hike.

Design-wise, none of the watch faces really stood out. But there are enough options that I’m confident you’ll find something you’ll like and would want to stick with.

Tracking is insightful and fun

Onto to the hike! We were told it would take about four to five hours to complete the route. Naturally, we took longer than that. To completely track everything you need to go to workouts and choose outdoor walk.

The Honor Band 5 supports other workouts too like outdoor and indoor running, outdoor and indoor cycling, free training, and much more.

The trek had several stops — some were for resting, others were for the accompanying ranger to tell us more about the reserve. At each stop, I would check on the watch to see how many steps I’ve taken so far. Especially since the trail varies from straight and narrow paths to ones that require climbing.

The trek involved climbing down nets like this

Having the heart rate monitor up, I also made a conscious effort to check on my breathing. I’ve never really had strong lungs. Even when I still used to play basketball regularly when I was a lot younger, I was quick to run out of breath.

When I saw my heart rate going up so much higher than usual, I made it a point to stop for a while and take a few deep breaths to gather myself. The SpO2 Monitor2 also came in handy here. It detects your level of oxygen at different altitudes and thankfully mine stayed in the normal range for much of the trek.

There were too many of these nets. Not apparent in photo is the fear and dread I felt climbing down

Additionally, the colored amoled display on the Honor Band 5 made it easy to check on my numbers. This is also through even when it started to rain. I could still see the numbers clearly despite the watch being drenched.

The Honor Band 5 is water resistant for up to 50m. So not only can it survive the rain, it’s also made to accompany you during your swimming sessions.

Taking a closer look at the numbers

After the hike, you’ll need to stop the tracking so you get your entire workout summary. It took us nearly eight hours to complete the trek and the rest of my numbers are pretty interesting.

The Masungi Georeserve took our collective breaths in more ways than one

I took a total of 11,611 steps on an average cadence of 24 steps per minute with an average speed of 1.78km/h and an average heart rate of 129 bpm. If you thought that was confusing, it only means I’m about as out of shape as I expected myself to be.

You can check your data against what is supposed to be the average for a healthy human being. With this you can start working towards that goal. The idea is to gradually reach a state of being healthy and tracking your numbers will help you do that.

Other features and final thoughts

The Honor Band 5 also has a few other nifty features like Find Your Phone. Say you forgot where you last put your phone, the fitness band can ring it for you.

There’s also TruSleep tech that I didn’t get to try as much on this device but I did on the Honor Watch Magic so watch out for that article as well.

Just me trying to look triumphant midway through the hike

The Honor Band 5 promises up to 14 days of battery life. I had it on for a few more days post the trek and didn’t really charge it up until the 10th or 11th day. Which is still pretty darn good.

At PhP 1,699 (US$ 33), the Honor Band 5 lives up to its billing as your personal fitness tracker. The colored AMOLED display is great and the tracking is where you’d expect it to be. It’s also comfortable enough that you won’t mind having it on while you workout.

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Vivo V17 Pro Unboxing and Review

Overpriced and gimmicky?

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Vivo’s newest smartphone has cool camera features, including the world’s first dual pop-up selfie camera.

But is that enough for you to want to upgrade, or is the Vivo V17 Pro overpriced with a lot of gimmicks?

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Her GadgetMatch

LG Pra.L’s Galvanic Ion Booster makes your skincare products more effective

Makes your visits to the facial clinic less frequent

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The marriage of beauty and tech is not an entirely new thing. Ionic products, tools that are supposed to help slow down the signs of ageing, even water bottles that will supposedly make water better for your skin — they have been around for a while. LG’s new, Pra.L line is one of the most recent launches which was met with both shock and awe. This is mainly due to the new claims of what their high-grade devices can do but also because of the price tag they come with.

I personally love this whole movement. In the advent of the informed consumer trend, more and more people are becoming concerned about what they put on their skin. It’s highly common now that women who are into skincare are vigorously discussing ingredients. A lot of us are also becoming more interested in the details of what aestheticians are doing for us.

The entire Pra.L line is practically a beauty clinic within the convenience of your own home. It is democratizing the technology of some of the most common, non-invasive treatments and making it accessible to consumers who want to do things on their own.

One of the notable devices in the line is the Galvanic Ion Booster. The idea of an ion booster to help skincare products penetrate deeper into the skin is not entirely new. LG’s version of the device, however, is definitely a cut above most of the products in the market.

As someone with sensitive skin which is on a recovery period from hormonal breakouts, I tend to be quite picky with anything I put on my skin. It has also been recommended that I go for simpler routines using as few products as possible. With little product, you’d want them to be as effective as possible. This is where this device comes in.

Ease of use

For the past month, I’ve been using the Galvanic Ion Booster religiously — morning and night. I would use the cleansing mode with my CeraVe Hydrating Facial Cleanser (green bottle, for normal to dry skin). The device literally tells you which part of your face you should be using it on. The voice is not too loud but perky enough to get you out of your own head. Just in case you get too in the zone. Using galvanic ion technology, the device helps the cleanser draw out the impurities in your pores. Expect a slight vibration that is more relaxing than uncomfortable.

For the boost mode, I either use it with a vitamin C serum or The Ordinary’s Alpha Arbutin 2% + HA. Both serums are helpful in brightening the skin and fading out the marks left behind by intense breakouts. For the boost mode, the same technology is applied but in a reverse direction, helping the product and its ingredients penetrate your skin deeper. The boost mode is something I enjoy a lot as you can actually feel your products getting absorbed right away. I top everything with a gentle moisturizer from La Roche-Posay and on days when it’s extremely dry outside, a face oil from Australian indie beauty brand Ipsum.

I also use it with retinol treatments once a week but would make sure I double up on sunscreen the next day. The heat and vibration from the device do render retinol to be more effective. However, it will also make your skin more susceptible to sun damage.

When a stubborn pimple decides to pop up unannounced, I also use the boost mode to help my Mamonde AC Balance Spot Serum be absorbed faster. I wake up the next day with the little bugger dry and ready to be forgotten in the next couple of days.

Worth the price tag?

The device’s triangular head is made out of medical-grade titanium, making it safe for use on your skin. The shape is also effective in reaching the small nooks around your face like the sides of your nose. I just make sure to clean the device with running water and wipe it dry before putting on the cover.

LG’s Galvanic Ion Booster also has a good weight to it without being too heavy. The device also travels well — it comes with its own carrying pouch — and can charge with a micro USB cable or through the charging dock it comes with. The sleek design of the device makes it an easy hold and a joy to use. This, despite having to move it around your face for about three minutes per mode. Sounds like a short time but not when you’re a busy, working woman. I found it to be a lesson in slowing down and just making sure I enjoy doing my skincare routine instead of rushing through it like a chore — a form of self-love if you will.

Is this your GadgetMatch?

After a month of use, my skin feels more plump and healthy. It’s also brighter and blemishes became more manageable. I can highly recommend this for the skincare junkie; It’s a game-changer.

The device retails for SG$ 529 which might seem like a huge blow to the wallet. However, prevention is definitely less expensive than cure so think of it as an investment for the future.

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