Camera Shootouts

OPPO F5 vs Vivo V7+: Side-by-side comparison

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These days, in the smartphone world, it’s all about the displays and bezels — or the lack thereof. Two nearly borderless contenders are from brands which are known for their selfie capabilities.

OPPO F5 vs Vivo V7+: Side-by-side comparison

The OPPO F5 and Vivo V7+, though still tagged as selfie smartphones, are marketed as “borderless” devices which cost only a fraction of those bezel-less flagships. These recent releases look pretty similar, so we decided to see where the phones differ.

Side-by-side

The OPPO F5 and Vivo V7+ have taller displays with a 18:9 ratio. Both phones are the respective brands’ first attempt at near-borderless displays.

The OPPO F5 has a 6-inch screen while the Vivo V7+’s display is 5.99 inches — not much of a difference. However, the V7+ has a resolution of 720 x 1440 pixels which pales in comparison to the F5’s 1080 x 2160 pixels.

OPPO F5 vs Vivo V7+ displays

OPPO F5 (left) and Vivo V7+ (right)

Both phones have relocated the fingerprint scanner to the back with identical placements, the only difference being the actual shape of the scanner.

These phones have plastic backs, but they feel far from cheap. Both have a nice matte finish that makes them look premium.

OPPO F5 vs Vivo V7+ rear cameras

On the upper-right, the OPPO F5 has the SIM card slot and power button; the Vivo V7+ has the volume rocker and power button.

OPPO F5 vs Vivo V7+

On the other side, the F5 houses the volume rocker while the V7+ has only the SIM slot on there. Both phones have space for two nano-SIMs and a microSD card.

OPPO F5 vs Vivo V7+

The speaker grilles, micro-USB port, and audio jack are all found at the bottom of the phones.

OPPO F5 vs Vivo V7+ ports

Admittedly, the only reason I could tell these two phones apart, face up, is the fact that our units came in different colors. I don’t think that will be the case had they been both black. ?

Camera performance

Now, on to the selfies!

To accommodate smaller bezels, the phones have done away with the dual-cam selfie setup. The OPPO F5 has a 20-megapixel front-facing camera while the Vivo V7+ has a 24-megapixel selfie camera and front-facing LED fill light (no need for these ridiculous light cases).

Both have their respective beauty and bokeh modes, though the F5 gets props for a standalone bokeh mode. On the V7+, the bokeh mode can only be done while on beauty mode, but you can always just toggle the beauty filter to zero.

Selfies come out great on both phones, with Vivo’s photos coming out noticeably brighter and more saturated — something most selfie-loving folks seem to prefer. Software bokeh cut-outs are looking pretty good on both, too.

A notable add-on would be the OPPO F5’s built-in artificial intelligence on its front-facing camera. OPPO claims that this feature allows for a beauty mode that’s more natural, even going as far as recognizing the selfie subject’s age, sex, and race for optimum selfie results.

Naturally, a group selfie was in order to test it.

With one tap (auto mode), better and more natural selfies were shot with the OPPO F5, especially compared to previous OPPO releases. The filter did not blur out features and our faces didn’t look washed out!

A comparable selfie is achievable with the V7+ after experimenting with the beauty mode; you have to find just the right settings. A quick zoom on the photos, though, will show you the slight but very important detail on photos from the F5: That are your pores are still visible, making for a more realistic beauty filter.

Both phones are equipped with 20-megapixel rear cameras with an LED flash. Beauty mode is available on the rear cameras for both handsets, though neither have a bokeh feature on this camera.

The shooters are very capable, even under low-light scenarios — without even activating the manual mode, which of course, both phones have. The photo above, however, shows the phones’ varying treatments for the same difficult shot.

The two devices have built-in beauty modes for video, but the V7+ only allows for this feature while on video calls for certain apps, and the OPPO F5 only has the function on its integrated camera app.

What’s inside

The OPPO F5 runs on a MediaTek MT6763T processor with Android 7.1 and ColorOS 3.2. The Vivo V7+ is powered by a Snapdragon 450 processor (a processor comparable to the older Snapdragon 625 as Dan had explained on his Vivo V7+ review) on Android 7.1 with FunTouch OS.

Both have 4GB of memory, but the V7+ has a higher storage capacity at 64GB compared to the F5’s 32GB. The V7+ also has a slightly bigger battery capacity of 3225mAh as opposed to the F5’s 3200mAh capacity.

Which is your GadgetMatch?

These phones deliver the bezel-less experience without having to cough up money for a flagship. At the end of the day, this led to certain sacrifices specs-wise — though that certainly doesn’t mean these aren’t capable devices, because they are.

It just depends where your priorities lie: The OPPO F5 for the more capable beauty mode, or the Vivo V7+ for more vivid photos and the more capable processor.

girl holding OPPO F5 and Vivo V7+

The main point is: If a bigger screen is your priority, one of these two phones — depending on what type of user you are — may just be your GadgetMatch. Priced at PhP 15,990 (around US$ 305) for the OPPO F5 and PhP 17,990 (close to US$ 355) for the Vivo V7+, these two are definite contenders for the more affordable bezel-less smartphone category.

SEE ALSO: OPPO F5 hands-on: A nearly borderless selfie phone

[irp posts=”20856″ name=”Vivo V7+ Unboxing and Review”]

Camera Shootouts

Huawei Mate 50 Pro vs HONOR Magic4 Pro: Camera Shootout

Camera battle between two companies that used to be together

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Huawei HONOR

In case you didn’t know, HONOR used to be Huawei’s sub-brand — until they decided to part ways. While still using Huawei’s EMUI software (but calling it Magic UI), HONOR is now operating as a separate entity.

But what actually makes the HONOR Magic4 Pro different from Huawei’s reborn flagship, the Mate 50 Pro?

Well, aside from the obvious Magic vs Mate branding, Huawei has its own “Ultra Aperture” camera. Coined from the term itself, it features a dual-variable aperture versus the Magic4 Pro’s fixed f/1.8 lens opening.

Huawei Mate 50 Pro HONOR Magic4 Pro
Wide 50MP f/1.4-4.0
PDAF + Laser AF + OIS
50MP f/1.8
Multi-Directional PDAF + Laser AF
Ultra-Wide 13MP f/2.2 120º 50MP f/2.2 122º
Telephoto 64MP f/3.5
3.5x optical zoom
100x digital zoom
OIS
64MP f/3.5
3.5x optical zoom
100x digital zoom
OIS
Selfie 13MP f/2.4 + ToF 3D Depth 12MP f/2.4 + ToF 3D Depth

It also looks like the megapixel count is smaller on the ultra-wide unit of the Huawei Mate 50 Pro. Aside from that, the periscope telephoto lens and selfie cameras of the two phones are very much alike.

Now that you get a clear picture between the similarities and differences of each phone’s camera system, let’s get on to our camera shootout!

Wide

As previously mentioned, the Mate 50 Pro features a dual-variable aperture while the Magic4 Pro is consistent with its aperture offering. But can you really tell which is which considering they both feature a 50MP sensor?

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5 (Portrait)

Huawei HONOR

#6

Huawei HONOR

#7

#8

Ultra-Wide

For shots that require a wider Field of View (FoV), which do you think wins this round considering that the Magic4 Pro features a 50MP ultra-wide shooter while the Mate 50 Pro has a measly 12MP UWA shooter? (Despite the same f/2.2 aperture)

#9

Mate 50 Pro Magic4 Pro

#10

#11

Huawei HONOR

Periscope Telephoto: Optical Zoom

Both the Mate and the Magic have a similar 64MP f/3.5 lens that has an optical zoom range of 3.5x. But of course, there would still be a difference in post-processing AI algorithm.

#12

#13

Mate 50 Pro Magic4 Pro

#14

 #15

#16

Mate 50 Pro Magic4 Pro

Periscope Telephoto: Lossless to Digital Zoom

With a similar periscope lens, both phones can both achieve a 10x lossless zoom and up to 100x digital zoom. But in this specific section, I chose to just zoom up digitally to just 60x.

#17 (10x)

#18 (10x)

#19 (30x)

#20 (60x)

Night Mode

This is what makes or breaks a smartphone camera. With the obvious differences in Night Mode processing magic, one phone definitely stands out. That’s either a matter of personal preference or just fans’ favorites.

#21 (Ultra-wide)

Huawei HONOR

#22

Huawei HONOR

#23

Huawei HONOR

#24

Huawei HONOR

#25

Huawei HONOR

#26 (3.5x zoom)

Mate 50 Pro Magic4 Pro

#27

#28

Huawei HONOR

#29

Huawei HONOR

#3o

Huawei HONOR

BONUS: Super Macro

Just like other flagship smartphones nowadays, Super Macro is a feature that uses the ultra-wide lenses instead of the regular wide one in order to take close-up macro shots of objects. Doing so requires you to go closer to the subject you are shooting.

Huawei HONOR

Results

You may already have a hint considering the results are consistent throughout the board:

Photo A — HONOR Magic4 Pro

Photo B — Huawei Mate 50 Pro

Conclusion

What should set both phones apart are the way they process each shot — but Huawei and HONOR’s similar AI camera processing techniques are what actually makes it hard to differentiate one phone from another.

Huawei HONOR

For the most part, you can barely tell which is which. Shots taken during the broad daylight looked barely different regardless if its the regular wide, ultra-wide, or even the periscope telephoto lens.

Huawei HONOR

But in some instances, the HONOR Magic4 Pro boosts saturation while the Huawei Mate 50 Pro samples focuses on brightening up the shots. However, its dual-variable aperture camera did not really make drastic differences in daylight shots for it to be considered a “groundbreaking” camera feature in today’s flagship smartphones.

HONOR Magic4 Pro

Now when it comes to Night Mode “Magic”, the Huawei Mate 50 Pro is the clearer winner — especially with its very wide f/1.4 aperture. As I told in my past camera shootouts, the “better” Night Mode shot isn’t just about being the brightest nor the most vibrant of the bunch.

In the case of the Mate, it displayed the right amount of shadows, highlights, contrast and even the dynamic range. Most of all, its saturation what you can actually see irl.

Honestly speaking, I thought the HONOR Magic4 Pro is one among the best flagship smartphones for night photography. But after seeing how there’s a clear distinction between it and the Huawei Mate 50 Pro, I have reconsidered my opinion.

Huawei HONOR

The less-saturated look of the night shots taken with the HONOR Magic4 Pro is preferential though. Some may still like it because it gives you that flat, RAW-like image. Thus, giving you more creative freedom in post-processing the shot afterwards.

Honestly, you can never go wrong between choosing these smartphones. But the dealbreaker is: can you compromise 5G and proper GMS support over a set of cameras that perform better at night?

SEE ALSO:

 

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Camera Shootouts

iPhone 14 Pro Max vs iPhone XS Max: Camera Shootout

Do you really need to upgrade now?

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iPhone 14 Pro Max

The iPhone XS Max was announced way back in 2018. It was the first “Max” model introduced alongside its smaller sibling, the iPhone XS.

Four years later, we now have the iPhone 14 series. Aside from the two base models, there are also the “Pro” variants. Thus, making the iPhone 14 Pro Max as XS Max’s direct successor.

Obviously, the newer iPhone has better cameras across the board — especially with its evident trio set of eye-boggling cameras.

iPhone 14 Pro Max iPhone XS Max
Wide 48MP f/1.8
Sensor-Shift OIS + Dual-Pixel PDAF
12MP f/1.8
OIS + Dual-Pixel PDAF
Ultra-Wide 12MP f/2.2 120º N/A
Telephoto 12MP f/2.8
3x optical zoom
12MP f/2.4
2x optical zoom
Others Dual-LED Dual-Tone Flash
LiDAR Scanner
Up to 4K/60fps
Cinematic Mode 4K
Quad-LED Dual-Tone Flash

Up to 4K/60fps

But is it really time for iPhone XS Max users to upgrade? Or should you wait a little longer for the next best camera(s) in an iPhone?

For fairness’ sake

iPhone 14 Pro Max

I only compared the two iPhones using their respective wide (main) sensor — together with some 2x shots:

  • The gigantic 48MP main sensor on the 14 Pro Max wasn’t maximized; shots were taken via Auto Mode instead of ProRAW
  • 2x digital zoom was used on the 14 Pro Max instead of its dedicated telephoto zoom lens that optically zooms in to 3x
  • Ultra-wide was not used because the XS Max doesn’t have one
  • Night Mode was also turned off as the iPhone XS Max lacks Night Mode capabilities

And unlike our other camera shootouts, the order of these photos are not time-dependent.

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10

#11

#12

#13

#14

#15

#16

#17

#18

#19

#20

#21

iPhone 14 Pro Max

#22

#23

iPhone 14 Pro Max

#24

iPhone 14 Pro Max

#25

iPhone 14 Pro Max

#26

#27

iPhone 14 Pro Max

#28

#29

#30

BONUS: Macro Control

Macro mode was introduced in last year’s iPhone 13 Pro series. Instead of using the regular wide lens for taking macro closeups, it utilizes the ultra-wide lens. While most may not notice the split-second camera behavior, your iPhone detects and automatically switches the camera to the ultra-wide lens.

iPhone 14 Pro Max

The same case happens in the iPhone 14 Pro Max. If you don’t toggle the ‘Macro Control’ feature via Settings, you would barely notice that you’re already taking a photo using the ultra-wide lens instead of the regular wide (main) sensor.

iPhone 14 Pro Max

It may not matter to most but the photo sample above just shows how there’s a major difference in focus and depth-of-field. Can you tell which is which?

Results

As obvious as the photos look, here are the results:

A – iPhone 14 Pro Max

B – iPhone XS Max

Conclusion

Even if you’re not leaning towards photography, the iPhone 14 Pro Max displayed better photos. And if I were to be specific, its post-processing techniques have improved over the last four years — be that its contrast, dynamic range, AWB (Auto White Balance), and most of all, sharpness.

iPhone 14 Pro Max

But in some instances like in Photos #2 #4 #11 #16 #18 and #26, the iPhone XS Max doesn’t really lag too far behind. If it weren’t for the obvious (over)sharpening, you wouldn’t totally guess that the iPhone XS Max is the contender.

iPhone 14 Pro Max

For the most part, the iPhone XS Max can still keep up — especially in daylight photos. The iPhone 14 Pro Max barely showed real improvements especially in the last three daylight photos in the set. And as I already mentioned the Macro Control feature earlier, it’s also worth pointing out that unlike past iPhones, the iPhone 14 Pro Max cannot go closer to a subject (for reference, see Photo #9) or else it will force you to switch to Macro Mode / ultra-wide lens usage.

iPhone 14 Pro Max

But for all the obvious reasons, upgrading from the iPhone XS Max to the all-new iPhone 14 Pro Max won’t be a disappointment.

You’ll get an ultra-wide lens and on top of its 2x crop zoom, there’s an extra 3x optical zoom lens if you like taking zoomed shots more. Lastly, even if Night Mode was turned off (and both phones have an identical f/1.8 aperture), low-light samples on the iPhone 14 Pro Max are just ahead of the game compared to its predecessor. Its brighter, has shallower bokeh, and most of all, has plenty of detail thanks to the new chipset, larger image sensor, and better lens optics.

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Camera Shootouts

vivo V25 vs V23 5G: Camera Shootout

Are there even significant improvements?

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vivo V25

It hasn’t even been a year but vivo has already revealed the successor to the V23 5G that was launched earlier this 2022. But is it actually worth upgrading to the new vivo V25? Or should you save yourself some money and buy the older V23 5G instead?

vivo V25

Don’t let that new camera bump with bigger circular cutouts on the vivo V25 fool you. On paper, the cameras are close to one another but the V25 has the advantage of having a slightly wider aperture and OIS (Optical Image Stabilization) that the V23 5G doesn’t have.

vivo V25 vivo V23 5G
Wide 64MP f/1.79
PDAF, OIS + EIS
64MP f/1.89
PDAF, EIS
Ultra-WIde 8MP 120º f/2.2
Macro 2MP f/2.4
Selfie 50MP f/2.0 wide

 

50MP f/2.0 wide
8MP f/2.28 ultra-wide
+ Dual-tone Spotlight

The sad news though is that, vivo has decided to remove the extra ultra-wide selfie camera and dual flash system on the new V25.

vivo V23 with the Dual-tone Spotlight Flash feature

But how do these phones perform side-by-side knowing the new V25 also has a slightly less-powerful MediaTek Dimensity 900 chipset over V23 5G’s Dimensity 920? Are there enough convincing differences or is the older model actually better? Feed yourself some photo sample comparisons below.

Daylight

In any given circumstance, a valuable Android midranger should take at least a decent photo with natural light around — thus me taking lesser photos to compare.
Still, your judgment matters.

#1A (Ultra-wide)

vivo V25

#1B (Wide)

vivo V25

#2

#3A (Wide)

#3B (Zoom)

Food

Taking food shots (mostly with indoor lighting) is a better way to test which phone camera is capable of producing the better image output with the right amount of highlights, shadows, contrast, sharpness, temperature, as well as Dynamic Range.

#4

#5

#6

#7

#8

#9

#10

#11

*Left photo was taken multiple times with the focus tapped on the baked roll. Lens coating was also cleaned several times but still resulted to the same output.

#12

Night Mode

Low-light photos can either make or break the capabilities of a smartphone’s camera.
While it’s a mixed bag of outputs, it still depends on the user if Night Mode photos are important in a midranger or not.

#13A (Wide)

#13B (Ultra-wide)

#14

#15

#16

#17

#18

vivo V25

#19

vivo V25

#20

vivo V25

BONUS: Low-Light Selfie

For users who love taking selfies even in the dark, both phones can take fill-in flash (using the display) to brighten up your faces.

Without Flash

vivo V25

However, the ultra-wide selfie and Dual-tone Spotlight feature were removed completely from the vivo V25. You just have to guess and pick which is which.

With Flash (Aura Fill, Dual-Tone Dual Spotlight Flash)

vivo V25

Results

No more confusions, the results are consistent all throughout the board:

Photo A — vivo V23 5G

Photo B — vivo V25

Conclusion

vivo V25

While it’s barely a big camera quality improvement, the vivo V25 has rendered some of the scenes quite well such as in Photos 1A, 11, and 12 which the V23 5G failed to display at least an acceptable output. Other times, the vivo V23 5G delivered better results like in Photos 1B, 2, 3A, 4, and 13A. Those images delivered overall better photos with a sufficient amount of HDR (High Dynamic Range) and AWB (Auto White Balance).

Overall, the V25 produced better images with decent amount of highlights, shadows, contrast, sharpness. The newer model also has some slight edge on focusing and making shots brighter and more stable at night.

vivo V25

While only two selfies were provided, the V23 5G obviously has the edge — especially with its extra selfie lens and dual-flash feature.

vivo V25

If you’re coming from the V23 5G, you don’t need to upgrade to the vivo V25. Period. But, if you’re looking for a phone to replace your old vivo smartphone (or pretty much any old budget phone or midranger for that matter), buying the V25 won’t hurt.

vivo V25

Unless you’re looking for a used unit, a brand new vivo V23 5G is being sold at PhP 27,999. Whereas, a brand new V25 retails at a cheaper PhP 23,999 price tag.

vivo V25

Imho, choosing the V23 5G over the V25 is advantageous for some reasons: a more premium-looking design with metallic sides, slightly faster chipset, and the extra selfie camera.

vivo V25

But realizing how more capable the cameras of the V25 are, you can also choose it for its bigger battery and brighter display. Also, the OIS feature is very handy if you love taking photos in action or at night or just record stable-free videos without worrying about warping and jitters. At the end of the day, you should know what you value the most in buying a new smartphone.

SEE ALSO:

vivo V25 is a Night Portrait Master

Taking photos to the next level with the vivo V23 5G

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