Gaming

Finally: Japan welcomes Pokémon Go

Published

on

Pikachu is home, and by that we mean you can now catch Pokémon’s iconic yellow mouse where it all started.

Pokémon Go is “finally broadcasting” in its native Japan, Niantic Labs, the company responsible for the now-wildly popular mobile game, announced. It was only a matter of time; in fact, the game was supposed to launch in Japan on July 20, but its release was postponed after a leaked email that gave the public a heads up became viral.

Japan is Pokémon Go‘s first stop in Asia, but other countries in the region are likely to follow soon. The game is now available in 36 countries and regions, including the U.S. and most of Europe. Niantic Labs chief executive John Hanke said in an interview he wants to make the title available to 200 more countries.

Japan is also the first location where the hit Pokémon title has a sponsorship deal that will see more than 3,000 McDonald’s Japan restaurants become Pokémon Go gyms, where players can train and battle their pokémon. Fast-food restaurants across the country will also sell Happy Meals with limited-edition Pokémon toys in them.

The partnership will no doubt drive unprecedented foot traffic to McDonald’s locations, though a company representative said stores would “call on players not to become a bother to customers who are eating.” Because the last thing you want to worry about while eating your matcha McFlurry is a kid breaking into your private space and obsessing over a Charizard (read: rare pokémon) on your table.

Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 3.23.54 PM

The warning issued by Japan’s National Center of Incident Readiness and Strategy for Cybersecurity on Twitter and Line

Fearing the worst, Japanese authorities have taken measures to promote public safety, unsurprisingly, in cartoon form. Players have been asked to use “cool names that are different from real names” and try not to stay under the sun too long.

Pokémon phenomena has its roots in The Land of the Rising Sun, where the original Pokémon video games for the Nintendo Game Boy were released in the late 90s. The franchise has since spawned other video-game titles, trading card games, an animated TV series, animated movies, countless merchandise, and a real-life pokémon training facility in Osaka.

[irp posts=”3841″ name=”Pokémon Go goes live in PH, 14 other countries in Asia, Oceania”]

Gaming

Practically no one is playing Netflix’s games, report says

Despite being free to play

Published

on

Recently, Netflix gambled big on the future of its platform. Besides cutting a plethora of titles in production, the platform introduced a gallery of mobile games for all of its subscribers. As the gaming library grew, it acquired impressive titles from the best of the mobile gaming world. However, despite Netflix’s efforts, only less than one percent of the platform’s subscribers are playing the games.

In a new app study (via CNBC), Netflix’s games average only 1.7 million users daily. Overall, the games have been downloaded 23.3 million times.

Though not an insignificant number, the figure is a tiny, tiny portion of Netflix’s main user base. For reference, Netflix currently has around 221 million subscribers. That’s less than one percent of Netflix subscribers playing their games.

Netflix’s gaming strategy is an ongoing experiment. While the company has eyed the industry for a while now, Netflix is facing deeper gravitas with making sure every endeavor succeeds. As of late, the platform has bled for subscribers, new and old.

For the first time in a while, Netflix has lost subscribers, marking the rise in popularity of other streaming platforms. It isn’t the only shark in the lake. Hulu, Disney+, and HBO Max are creating compelling cases for a switch.

That said, if you still pay for a Netflix subscribers, the gaming library comes with the price of admission. Besides inspired titles from its properties like Stranger Things, the library also comes with heavy hitters like Spiritfarer.

SEE ALSO: Netflix’s The Gray Man is getting its own cinematic universe

Continue Reading

Accessories

Razer releases giant-sized gaming mouse mats in the Philippines

The Strider Chroma and Goliathus 3XL

Published

on

Strider Chroma

What’s better than a regular-sized gaming mouse pad? Giant-sized gaming mouse mats! In fact, two new ultra-sized gaming mouse mats from Razer, the Strider Chroma and Goliathus Chroma 3XL, are now both available in the Philippines.

The warp-and-water resistant Strider Chroma measures 900mm by 370mm and is 4mm thick. It is the world’s first hybrid soft/hard gaming mouse which come with 19 customizable lighting zones.

For an even larger mat that can cover an entire desk, the Goliathus Chroma 3XL measures a massive 1200mm by 550mm and is 3.5mm thick.

This soft mat is ideal for gamers who use lower DPI, or need to cover more ground while moving their mouse.

The two new accessories come with non-slip bases and are powered by Razer Chroma RGB to provide dynamic lighting effects while in-game.

The Strider Chroma is priced at PhP 8,490 while the Goliathus Chroma 3XL is available for PhP 6,990 via the Razer official website, Shopee, Lazada, and their authorized sellers nationwide.

Continue Reading

Gaming

Steam will support Joy-Cons soon

Plus other Nintendo controllers

Published

on

For how much they cost, the Nintendo Switch’s Joy-Cons could certainly see more use outside of console exclusivity. Thankfully, developers are finding new ways to use controllers for other applications. If you want to get more use out of your Joy-Cons, Steam is working on compatibility for the Switch controllers.

In a new Steam beta test, Valve released support for Joy-Cons and other Nintendo controllers. As you can do with a Switch, players will soon be able to use either just one Joy-Con or both as a pair. However, since it’s in beta, individual games have not announced support specifically for the Joy-Con.

If anything, connecting the Joy-Con through Steam should be relatively easy. The gaming hub already offers plug-and-play support for most controllers available in the market. Of course, better support means that developers (and fans) can tailor settings depending on controller.

With the number of third-party games on the Switch, it’s believable that there are Switch players who are making first-time transitions to PC gaming. In that case, allowing Joy-Cons into PC gaming — albeit not the best controller for such — will prove a necessary jumping point.

Besides Steam, Apple is also working on support for the Switch controllers, adding new life to the tiny pair. As for Steam, however, Joy-Con support should officially come soon after the beta test.

SEE ALSO: iOS 16 will support Nintendo Joy-Cons

Continue Reading

Trending