Features

Top 10 best-selling video games of all time

Can you guess the top spot?

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You can easily name your favorite video games of all time, but can you guess the best-selling ones? Since the question of which games strike out for someone is irrevocably subjective, it’s time we check the stats and see which ones won in the sales department. We’ve had the Top 10 best-selling video game consoles of all time before — from hardware to software we go. Play along and see if you can predict which games made it to the top ten! Can you guess them all right?

10. New Super Mario Bros. (2006)

Sales: 30.8 million

Mario and Luigi, heard of them? New Super Mario Bros. brought a spin on the 1985 classic side-scroller by bringing in shiny 3D graphics, new power-ups, and some of the iconic abilities Mario has learned through his long video-game career. The game struck a chord with the public; Nintendo sold a million copies in the first 12 weeks and the title quickly became the top-selling Nintendo DS title of all time.

9. Pokémon Red and Blue (1996)

Sales: 31.38 million

What kind of childhood did you have if you weren’t collecting Pokémon cards or leveling up your Jigglypuff in one of the many Pokémon video games? Pokémon Red and Blue were the start of the worldwide phenomenon, selling over 10 million copies within their first year in Japan. In 2009, 13 years after their release, The Guinness Book of World Records added this classic as the “Best-selling RPG on the Game Boy” and the “Best-selling RPG of all time.” Pokémon Red and Blue were both such amazing games that they had to re-release them on the Nintendo 3DS in 2016 while commemorating the franchise’s 20th anniversary!

8. Wii Sports Resort (2009)

Sales: 33.08 million

This is definitely the first surprise entry of the list. Wii Sports Resort was the second in the Wii Sports franchise — famous for, well, overzealous Wii remote swings causing all kinds of injury and destruction. While the series is known for using motion controls to play sports mini-games, this was the first title that introduced the Wii Remote Plus, meaning you had a lot more accuracy when it came to swinging your sword around.

7. Overwatch (2016)

Sales: 35 million

The first non-Nintendo title on the list! Surprised? To actually show how much this game blew up, Blizzard reported over US$ 1 billion in revenue during just the first year of its release. Overwatch is essentially the top best-selling first-person-shooter game of all time — beating Call of Duty with 10 titles between them. It is rightfully considered one of the best games released in 2016, receiving awards such as “Game of the Year” at The Game Awards 2016, D.I.C.E. Awards, and Game Developers Choice Awards.

6. Mario Kart Wii (2008)

Sales: 37.1 million

The Mario series is known for putting its colorful characters through multiple challenges, whether it’s playing yet another sport or simply beating each other up. But so far, the most successful game featuring Mario’s entourage is the sixth installment of the Mario Kart series: Mario Kart Wii. The Wii edition brought the roster together for another ride, this time with motion controls and an online mode. The Wii remote acted like a steering wheel and there was the option of buying a clip-on plastic steering wheel. Forget your realism in Gran Turismo or Forza; you’re looking at the best-selling racing game of all time!

5. Super Mario Bros. (1985)

Sales: 40.24 million

Did you forget that this long-running series is 35 years old? Super Mario Bros. is actually the second game in the series, where instead of fighting his younger brother, Mario has to rescue Princess Toadstool from his arch-nemesis Bowser. The side-scrolling platformer held the title of best selling game of all-time for 20 years and paved the way for the Italian plumber and his brother to stay in the hearts of kids around the world!

4. Wii Sports (2006)

Sales: 82.85 million

It’s the third Wii title on this list. Wow! It’s where injuries began despite the virtual reality aspect. Yes, my friends, when gaming was more than just thumb-work. A great example of technological advancements, it not only sustained the fun in playing games, but also integrated a healthier lifestyle within the confines of your home. Nintendo showed everyone that playing games doesn’t mean being a couch potato nor does it necessarily mean playing alone. Wii Sports was the perfect game to bond over with friends and family, and was so well-received that it’s actually the best-selling single-platform game of all time.

3. Grand Theft Auto V (2013)

Sales: 90 million

Can you believe this is nearing five years old already? The ultra-violent Grand Theft Auto series has had players stealing cars since 1997. The latest installment tried to innovate the series by having the plot revolve around three lead protagonists, giving the player the luxury of switching between the three characters to further the plot. While Grand Theft Auto V gave its fan base all of the street violence the series is known for, it also introduced Grand Theft Auto Online. The online mode allows up to 30 players to roam the streets of San Andreas and compete in challenges against each other. The main titles in the GTA series have always sold extremely well, but the latest title outsold the rest by 62.5 million copies. That’s 16th on the list.

2. Minecraft (2011)

Sales: 144 million

Ah, yes. Here we have the Lego of video games where players get to explore, build, and craft in a cubed 3D world. If you think you’re going to be spared the daunting feeling of old age, you’re wrong: Minecraft was released seven years ago. The game has come a long way. It has integrated multiple gameplay modes, from the familiar survival and ridiculous creative modes to a fun spectator mode. It’s really no surprise how Minecraft has received so much praise from critics and has won numerous awards since its release. Clones, parodies, adaptations, and merchandise have consistently grown the title’s popularity.

1. Tetris (1984)

Sales: 170 million

I guarantee you didn’t expect this to be here. The best-selling video game is the oldest game on the list. Tetris is the most iconic puzzle games of them all, forcing the player to micro-manage falling colored blocks and avoid getting overwhelmed and losing. But how is it here? The game, or its variant, is available for nearly every video game console and computer operating system. While you might remember this as being one of the most defining Game Boy releases, Tetris has become the best-selling paid and downloaded game of all time. Shockingly, that’s not all. Tetris on iOS and Android makes up 100 million of its grand total sales. Even if you removed its mobile phone dominance, it would still sit at fifth on the list.

As much as these games were fun and enjoyable, they were mostly highlights in gaming. Not to mention, they pretty much took us back and made us feel old. Here would be the perfect time to insert the “what year is it” meme.

Jokes aside, it was interesting to find that six out of the 10 were developed by Nintendo. This isn’t much of a surprise if you’re a Nintendo baby. So, how well did you do? How many of these did you guess right?

SEE ALSO: Pokémon might release its eighth generation on the Nintendo Switch

SEE ALSO: Far Cry 5 review: Immersive playground in the heart of cultist America

Features

Samsung Galaxy S10 vs Galaxy S10+ vs Galaxy S10E: What are the differences?

A decade of Galaxies

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Samsung has launched three new flagship phones: the Galaxy S10, Galaxy S10+, and Galaxy S10E. With three new models to choose from, it might be difficult to choose which Galaxy S10 is the one for you.

To help with this, we took the liberty to show you the differences between the three. Which of the Galaxy S10 models will be your GadgetMatch?

Display

Starting with the screen, the three Galaxy S10 models sport Super AMOLED displays in different sizes. The Galaxy S10E is the smallest among the bunch with a 5.8-inch display. It’s followed by the regular Galaxy S10 with its 6.1-inch display and, of course, the Galaxy S10+ with its large 6.4-inch panel.

It’s also worth noting that the Galaxy S10E has a completely flat display, while the other two Galaxy S10 variants have the curved panels we’ve come to expect from Samsung.

All three models don’t sport a notch, but they do have holes on the upper-right corner for their front cameras. The Galaxy S10E and Galaxy S10 have a perfectly rounded hole-punch camera, while Galaxy S10+ has a pill-shaped cutout since it has two front-facing cameras.

Performance

Despite the size differences of the phones, all models are powered by a flagship processor. Depending on where you are, the Galaxy S10 family will sport either a Snapdragon 855 or an Exynos 9820.

Memory and storage configuration will also vary depending on the region. The lowest possible memory available is 6GB and it can go as high 12GB. As for storage, it starts at 128GB and will reach up to 1TB. The 12GB+1TB combo will be exclusively available for the Galaxy S10+.

Another significant difference between the Galaxy S10 phones is battery capacity. The Galaxy S10E has a modest 3100mAh battery, the Galaxy S10 owns a pretty standard 3400mAh battery, and the Galaxy S10+, being the biggest of the three, comes with a huge 4100mAh battery.

All three variants support fast charging using wired or wireless chargers. They can also do reverse wireless charging (which Samsung calls Wireless PowerShare) to charge other devices using the Qi wireless standard.

Lastly, both the Galaxy S10 and Galaxy S10+ feature the new ultrasonic in-display fingerprint reader, which is definitely faster than any of the in-display fingerprint readers we’ve tried before. The Galaxy S10E has a more conventional side-mounted fingerprint reader that’s still accurate and fast, but not as advanced.

Cameras

The Galaxy S10 and the Galaxy S10+ are the first among the Galaxy S lineup to have triple rear cameras. The setup is composed of a main 12-megapixel Dual Pixel and Dual Aperture camera, a 16-megapixel ultra wide-angle, and a 12-megapixel telephoto with 2x optical zoom.

Since the Galaxy S10E is priced lower, it only has two of the three rear cameras of its more expensive siblings: the main Dual Pixel camera and the ultra wide-angle shooter.

The situation in the front is quite different, though. Both the Galaxy S10 and Galaxy S10E have a single selfie camera, while the Galaxy S10+ gets an extra depth sensor for a more precise bokeh effect or Live Focus.

Pricing and colors

The cheapest model is the Galaxy S10E which starts at US$ 750. The regular Galaxy S10 will set you back US$ 900, while the bigger Galaxy S10+ is priced at US$ 1,000.

All three models will come in Prism White, Prism Black, Prism Green, and Prism Blue. In addition, the Galaxy S10E will be available in Canary Yellow, as well. The Galaxy S10+ also has premium Ceramic Black and Ceramic White variants, but these are only available for the high-tier configurations.

Colors option may vary per region, so not all colors will be available in all markets.

Get to know more about the latest Galaxy S10 series by watching our hands-on video:

SEE ALSO: Samsung Galaxy S10 Hands-on: A refinement of everything

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Galaxy S10

Instagram photo challenge with the Samsung Galaxy S10

Hands-on with all three versions!

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Samsung’s newest Galaxy S devices have just been announced and we’re blessed with three versions: The Samsung Galaxy S10e (small), the Galaxy S10 (big), and the Galaxy S10+ (big big!).

Each phone is equipped with a number of cameras so you know what that means: IG photo test!

In our Her GadgetMatch video, we check out what’s so cool about the new Samsung phones and test what the cameras can do. Spoiler: They do a lot!

In case you’re having trouble viewing, watch HERE.

SEE ALSO: Samsung’s new LED light cover is the phone case we’ve always wanted

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Galaxy S10

Samsung Galaxy S10 Hands-On

Does it live up to the hype?

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Infinity-O Display, five cameras, in-display fingerprint reader, next-generation wireless charging: these four features define Samsung’s new Galaxy S10.

When you take its features apart like this, it makes it seem like what we have is yet another underwhelming phone with no new groundbreaking feature. But to look at the S10 that way does the phone an injustice. It’s one that needs to be taken as a whole, not a sum of its parts.

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