Features

Top 10 best-selling video games of all time

Can you guess the top spot?

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You can easily name your favorite video games of all time, but can you guess the best-selling ones? Since the question of which games strike out for someone is irrevocably subjective, it’s time we check the stats and see which ones won in the sales department. We’ve had the Top 10 best-selling video game consoles of all time before — from hardware to software we go. Play along and see if you can predict which games made it to the top ten! Can you guess them all right?

10. New Super Mario Bros. (2006)

Sales: 30.8 million

Mario and Luigi, heard of them? New Super Mario Bros. brought a spin on the 1985 classic side-scroller by bringing in shiny 3D graphics, new power-ups, and some of the iconic abilities Mario has learned through his long video-game career. The game struck a chord with the public; Nintendo sold a million copies in the first 12 weeks and the title quickly became the top-selling Nintendo DS title of all time.

9. Pokémon Red and Blue (1996)

Sales: 31.38 million

What kind of childhood did you have if you weren’t collecting Pokémon cards or leveling up your Jigglypuff in one of the many Pokémon video games? Pokémon Red and Blue were the start of the worldwide phenomenon, selling over 10 million copies within their first year in Japan. In 2009, 13 years after their release, The Guinness Book of World Records added this classic as the “Best-selling RPG on the Game Boy” and the “Best-selling RPG of all time.” Pokémon Red and Blue were both such amazing games that they had to re-release them on the Nintendo 3DS in 2016 while commemorating the franchise’s 20th anniversary!

8. Wii Sports Resort (2009)

Sales: 33.08 million

This is definitely the first surprise entry of the list. Wii Sports Resort was the second in the Wii Sports franchise — famous for, well, overzealous Wii remote swings causing all kinds of injury and destruction. While the series is known for using motion controls to play sports mini-games, this was the first title that introduced the Wii Remote Plus, meaning you had a lot more accuracy when it came to swinging your sword around.

7. Overwatch (2016)

Sales: 35 million

The first non-Nintendo title on the list! Surprised? To actually show how much this game blew up, Blizzard reported over US$ 1 billion in revenue during just the first year of its release. Overwatch is essentially the top best-selling first-person-shooter game of all time — beating Call of Duty with 10 titles between them. It is rightfully considered one of the best games released in 2016, receiving awards such as “Game of the Year” at The Game Awards 2016, D.I.C.E. Awards, and Game Developers Choice Awards.

6. Mario Kart Wii (2008)

Sales: 37.1 million

The Mario series is known for putting its colorful characters through multiple challenges, whether it’s playing yet another sport or simply beating each other up. But so far, the most successful game featuring Mario’s entourage is the sixth installment of the Mario Kart series: Mario Kart Wii. The Wii edition brought the roster together for another ride, this time with motion controls and an online mode. The Wii remote acted like a steering wheel and there was the option of buying a clip-on plastic steering wheel. Forget your realism in Gran Turismo or Forza; you’re looking at the best-selling racing game of all time!

5. Super Mario Bros. (1985)

Sales: 40.24 million

Did you forget that this long-running series is 35 years old? Super Mario Bros. is actually the second game in the series, where instead of fighting his younger brother, Mario has to rescue Princess Toadstool from his arch-nemesis Bowser. The side-scrolling platformer held the title of best selling game of all-time for 20 years and paved the way for the Italian plumber and his brother to stay in the hearts of kids around the world!

4. Wii Sports (2006)

Sales: 82.85 million

It’s the third Wii title on this list. Wow! It’s where injuries began despite the virtual reality aspect. Yes, my friends, when gaming was more than just thumb-work. A great example of technological advancements, it not only sustained the fun in playing games, but also integrated a healthier lifestyle within the confines of your home. Nintendo showed everyone that playing games doesn’t mean being a couch potato nor does it necessarily mean playing alone. Wii Sports was the perfect game to bond over with friends and family, and was so well-received that it’s actually the best-selling single-platform game of all time.

3. Grand Theft Auto V (2013)

Sales: 90 million

Can you believe this is nearing five years old already? The ultra-violent Grand Theft Auto series has had players stealing cars since 1997. The latest installment tried to innovate the series by having the plot revolve around three lead protagonists, giving the player the luxury of switching between the three characters to further the plot. While Grand Theft Auto V gave its fan base all of the street violence the series is known for, it also introduced Grand Theft Auto Online. The online mode allows up to 30 players to roam the streets of San Andreas and compete in challenges against each other. The main titles in the GTA series have always sold extremely well, but the latest title outsold the rest by 62.5 million copies. That’s 16th on the list.

2. Minecraft (2011)

Sales: 144 million

Ah, yes. Here we have the Lego of video games where players get to explore, build, and craft in a cubed 3D world. If you think you’re going to be spared the daunting feeling of old age, you’re wrong: Minecraft was released seven years ago. The game has come a long way. It has integrated multiple gameplay modes, from the familiar survival and ridiculous creative modes to a fun spectator mode. It’s really no surprise how Minecraft has received so much praise from critics and has won numerous awards since its release. Clones, parodies, adaptations, and merchandise have consistently grown the title’s popularity.

1. Tetris (1984)

Sales: 170 million

I guarantee you didn’t expect this to be here. The best-selling video game is the oldest game on the list. Tetris is the most iconic puzzle games of them all, forcing the player to micro-manage falling colored blocks and avoid getting overwhelmed and losing. But how is it here? The game, or its variant, is available for nearly every video game console and computer operating system. While you might remember this as being one of the most defining Game Boy releases, Tetris has become the best-selling paid and downloaded game of all time. Shockingly, that’s not all. Tetris on iOS and Android makes up 100 million of its grand total sales. Even if you removed its mobile phone dominance, it would still sit at fifth on the list.

As much as these games were fun and enjoyable, they were mostly highlights in gaming. Not to mention, they pretty much took us back and made us feel old. Here would be the perfect time to insert the “what year is it” meme.

Jokes aside, it was interesting to find that six out of the 10 were developed by Nintendo. This isn’t much of a surprise if you’re a Nintendo baby. So, how well did you do? How many of these did you guess right?

SEE ALSO: Pokémon might release its eighth generation on the Nintendo Switch

SEE ALSO: Far Cry 5 review: Immersive playground in the heart of cultist America

Computers

This 34” LG UltraWide monitor disrupted my workflow

In the best way possible

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I’ve been working on a laptop almost exclusively for the better part of the last decade. It’s been so long that I had forgotten the benefits of working with a bigger screen — a benefit that was shoved into my face when I used the LG UltraWide 34” Curved monitor. 

Easy setup 

Putting it together was relatively easy. I didn’t need any special tools or anything of the sort. Everything just fit into place seamlessly.

Here are all the ports on its back. That’s two (2) HDMI ports, one (1) Display port, two (2) USB downstream ports, one (1) USB upstream port, and one (1) headphone out port.

It also comes with a cable organizer that you kind of clamp to the stand so your setup can look clean.

Once everything is plugged, you only need to use this button at the bottom center of the display to make any changes in the settings or switch between inputs should that be necessary.

My regular workflow

At any given day I can be doing anything from writing an article, a script, coordinating with the team and external partners, copy-editing articles, and video editing among others.

This means I toggle between screens A LOT. Other than that, my posture while working is mostly crouched down since I’m looking at the laptop screen.

However, that all changed when the fire nation attacked. No, I mean, it was definitely shaken up when I started using the LG UltraWide 34” Curved Monitor.

I didn’t really have a proper setup with it owing to the tiny space I live in but in the brief week that I used it, I started craving a better work from home setup.

How the LG UltraWide monitor disrupted my workflow

The first thing I noticed was how I was now looking up instead of looking down. It might not be that big a deal for younger people, but when you reach a certain age, even the smallest improvements to your posture can make a huge difference.

The extra space is invaluable. At one glance I can look at Slack and Tweetdeck. This means I can quickly look up if there’s anything new that needs to be edited while also monitoring any potential news that we should run on the website.

Bonus: I can also have a floating tab with a playlist of my favorite girls TWICE cheering me up as I slog through another work day.

This works in other instances too. I can pull up a press release for reference on one side of the screen and have Google Docs on another. This means I no longer have to quickly press Alt+Tab every time I need to double check details.

Just the overall convenience of seeing more at a glance is already a major upgrade to the workflow I’ve grown accustomed to.

Video editing

I no longer video edit as much as I used to due to changing roles and all. But here, the benefit of having a larger, wider monitor is even more pronounced.

Having a wide workspace means I didn’t have to hide certain tools while editing. They’re just there, easily and immediately accessible when I need them. It was honestly tough going back to the smaller screen especially for this task.

Taking less steps to complete your everyday tasks is a godsend. Every small thing adds up to a faster, smoother, and generally better working experience.

Should you upgrade to the LG Ultrawide 34” Monitor?

There are plenty of things to consider. For people like myself who have mostly worked on laptops, we’re pretty set in our ways. Plus there are a few other peripherals I might need to get so it’s not an easy yes or no decision.

You also need to consider your workspace. As I mentioned, I live in a rather tiny place with very little space to accommodate a fully desktop setup.

But this is me. If you’re still working on a more traditional 16×9 monitor, I guarantee the difference, while jarring at first, can be truly beneficial in the long run.

The LG Ultrawide 34” Curved Monitor retails for PhP 45,999 (around US$ 937). If you’re ready to splurge to up your productivity, this isn’t a bad place to start.

LG has other monitors you can check out. The UltraWide line of monitors start at PhP 12,699 for the 25”, PhP 14,799 for the 29”, PhP 29,499 for the 34”, and PhP 45,999 for the curved 34” version.

LG’s UltraGear gaming monitor line on the other hand starts at PhP 12,599 for the 24”, PhP 22,199 for the 27”, and PhP 23,999 for the 32”.

SEE ALSO: LG UltraGear 24” Gaming Monitor review: Enough to get you started

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Entertainment

The cost of the post-pandemic movie

Why you should care about Mulan’s terrible premiere

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The fate of the Hollywood blockbuster rests on a fingertip. A formerly grandiose affair with celebrities dressing up to the nines, the red-carpet premiere is now an impossibility thanks to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. On the other side, streaming services blossomed with new titles and exclusives. It was (and is) a great era for the home theater. But the home theater will not last forever. Hollywood is now facing a crisis for the future of the premiere.

If the past year is any indication, Hollywood will, of course, not go down without a fight. Large networks and production houses have released their own streaming platforms to monopolize their content, putting additional weight on a consumer’s budget. Take Disney’s Disney+ or NBC’s Peacock, for instance. Now, a few of these (like Disney and Netflix) make their own blockbuster content as well. We’ve seen Netflix’s streaming-only premieres already. How about Disney’s (or anyone else’s) Hollywood premieres, which often rely on astounding box office numbers?

This week, we got a taste of such a strange premiere scheme. In an earnings call, Disney CEO Bob Chapek detailed the future of a delayed movie, Mulan. Initially premiering in theaters back in March, Mulan was repeatedly delayed because of the continued shutdown of movie theaters. Now, as the company is itching to finally launch it, Chapek announced a hybrid release for the film. Partly premiering in theater in safe countries, the film will also launch simultaneously on Disney+ for unsafe markets.

Now, here’s the catch: the film will cost US$ 29.99 for Disney+ users. Even if you have a subscription already, you have to fork over approximately PhP 1,474 to watch the new film. Of course, the hair trigger response is, “c’mon, Disney; stop haggling money from your customers.” And the response is right. However, there is so much more to this. Mulan can set the stage for an unprecedented era for Hollywood premieres.

Let’s get down to business

In New York, an average movie ticket costs around US$ 15 (approximately PhP 736). Mulan’s price tag is twice as much as a theater ticket. It’s even weightier in cheaper states and, most especially, in the Philippines (where movie tickets are only around US$ 5). Further, you’ll still need an active Disney+ account to access the film, costing an additional US$ 6.99.

(Naturally, it’s impossible to accurately translate the prices to an Asian market since Disney+ has not launched in all of Southeast Asia yet. We can only assume that Mulan’s streaming price is 200 percent of normal ticket prices, whatever it might be.)

Objectively, Mulan’s price is worse than a regular movie ticket. It’s easy to conclude the argument with this statement and head home. However, there is a way to justify the price.

The whole family plus your cow

Now, a single movie ticket typically admits one person. Buying Mulan pays for the streaming privilege which can typically include an entire family. With a 15-dollar average, two people watching the same Mulan purchase is already a break-even point. In the same vein, a family of four obtains double the value of the 30-dollar film price. Even better, a family can watch the film over and over again. And, as any parent who has a Frozen-loving child can tell you, unlimited playbacks is a blessing for your wallet (albeit a curse on your sanity).

Unfortunately, despite the mathematical mind-bending, Mulan’s price is still far from ideal. The movie-going experience is not the same on a streaming platform as in a cinema.

An assumption of equality

A cinema ticket is price of equality. Besides a few slight differences, everyone is paying for the same product. All other things considered equal, a 20-year old college student is paying and enjoying the same experience as a 50-year old CEO. Same film, same seat cushions, same facilities, same projector.

On the other hand, a streaming subscription cannot assume the same thing. A platform cannot control where and with what device a user will watch the movie from. A 20-year old college student watching the film on a laptop screen in a poorly lit dorm room is not enjoying the same experience as a 50-year old CEO watching the same thing in their high-end home theater with Dolby Atmos.

Likewise, the platform cannot assume how many people will watch the film in one purchase. Now, Mulan is a family film. Disney can easily assume that multi-person families will buy and watch the film. However, how will the audiences take the same price tag for a more polarized movie like Christopher Nolan’s Tenet or the next James Bond film?

All of Hollywood knows you’re here

In the same announcement, Chapek hints that Mulan’s price is just a “one-off.” Basically, other films might not follow the same pricing scheme. In a way, it makes sense. Mulan was made with a pre-coronavirus budget. It was expected to make millions from box office tickets. This might be the only way for Mulan to recoup its many losses. In the future, Disney might make films with lesser budgets and lesser expectations.

However, make no mistake; other filmmakers are intently watching Mulan’s performance on streaming. If Mulan succeeds, they can likely charge the same amount without incurring a lot of losses. That said, streaming premiere prices will likely vary from film to film. Even then, this isn’t the last discussion on the future of the film industry.

If the industry hopes to adapt to the new normal, it needs to rethink its strategy even further. Disney is offering only one solution for the problem of streaming. Unfortunately, the brand’s solution leverages a family-oriented release, one that might not appeal to the average moviegoer today.

A price worth fighting for

My suggestion: Implement a tiered premiere price. Not everyone will want to pay the full 30 dollars for a film they’re not wholly interested in. Most will watch it once and forget about it. Some won’t even care about watching it in HD.

Why not implement a pricing scheme based on those different preferences? For example, charge US$ 5 for a standard-definition, one-time playback premiere; US$ 10 for an HD, one-time playback premiere; US$ 20 for a standard-definition, unlimited playback premiere; and US$ 30 for an HD, unlimited playback premiere. In one swoop, a film can appeal to all streaming markets and needs.

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Hands-On

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra Unboxing, Hands-on & Camera Test!

Elegance and sophistication in an ULTRA-big device

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Just recently, we had a quick video introduction of Samsung’s latest Galaxy Note 20 series. Now, we finally have a Galaxy Note 20 Ultra on our hands!

Be sure to subscribe and hit that notification button to stay notified on our upcoming review video on August 18th.

For now, you can enjoy our unboxing, hands-on, and a quick camera test using the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra by clicking here.

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