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Fantastic Pokémon and Where to Find Them

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Wouldn’t it be great if you lived by a PokéStop or two? You could just sit on your couch, set a lure and have pokémon come to you? Don’t even think about it! Not only is that a lazy-ass idea, it’s not feasible. If you’re really serious about catching them all, you’ll need to put in the time, just like in the game or TV show, moving from place to place in search of them all.

Apart from Rattatas and Pidgeys that are literally everywhere, different types of pokémon spawn in different parts of the city. In Metro Manila, there are a few pokémon hotspots that are worth your while, we spent a week tracking them down and here are some of them. Goodluck!

best pokemon go locations in manila - bgc

Bonifacio Global City (Taguig)

Put on some running shoes and plan to spend an afternoon in Bonifacio Global City — home to some of the most diverse species of pokémon in the metropolis. If you only have time to see one place, BGC is the place to be. I find the best pokémon spawn along the edges of the Manila Golf and Country Club near three rotondas: Burgos Circle, De Jesus Oval by Kasalikasan garden, and Balanghai at the foot of Pacific Plaza. I’ve caught a few Vulpix out by Kasalikasan.

Pokémon also span close to the Mind Museum, diagonally across Bonifacio High Street, and along 32nd Street from S&R to St. Luke’s Medical Center. Popular pokémon in this area include Bellsprout, Bulbasaur, Exeggcute, Horsea, Nidoran, Paras, Pinsir, and Squirtle. I’ve also caught a Magmar, a Porygon, and a Scyther here — but maybe that was just pure luck.

best pokemon go locations in manila - sm mall of asia

SM Mall of Asia (Pasay)

If you’re hunting for electric-type pokémon, SM Mall of Asia is the best place to be. The massive shopping complex is teeming with Voltorbs and Magnemites. Because of its proximity to the sea expect to find a lot of Cloysters, Magikarps, and Poliwags, too. Occasionally, a few Pikachus will also show up. Many congregate on the corners of Seaside boulevard with Conrad Hotel on one end and Ocean Events Place on the other. Pokémon will pop up all around the MOA complex as well.

best pokemon go locations in manila - pearl drive

Pearl Drive (Ortigas)

The entire stretch of Pearl Drive in Ortigas near University of Asia and the Pacific is a treasure trove for water Pokémon. Walk back and forth between Lourdes Street and Exchange Road to farm for Magikarp – there’s no better place in the city to do so.

Pearl Drive is also a great place to find a Psyduck (or if you’re lucky, a Golduck — we’ve caught a few here, too), a Slowpoke, or a Staryu. Several times a day, the occasional Dratini will also spawn here — once I caught three in a span of 10 minutes. Dratinis will also spawn in front of the Philippine Stock Exchange Complex, and further down the road inside the parking lot of the Lopez Museum. Very rarely a Dragonair will also spawn in this area.

While you’re in Ortigas, cross over to Greenfield District in Mandaluyong across the road from Shangri-La Mall. The park is one of the few places in the Metro where Seel spawns regularly and to a certain extent Meowth. Come on a Friday or Saturday evening for the night market and the best-tasting Vietnamese Phở in town.

best pokemon go locations in manila - greenbelt

Greenbelt (Makati)

Not only is Greenbelt a PokéStop hotspot (most if not all always have lures, too) — it’s the best place to hunt for Growlithes. Almost always a Growlithe will spawn under the PokeGym in the middle of the park near the chapel. I recommend walking the stretch along the row of Greenbelt 5 restaurants from Museum Cafe all the way to National Bookstore at Greenbelt 1 — after an afternoon of hunting you should have enough candy for an Arcanine. Eevees, Magikarps, Poliwags, Staryus, and Tangelas are known to spawn here also.

While in Makati, another area worth checking out is the Ayala Triangle for all its PokéStops. Then head over to Salcedo Park, one of the best places to farm Eevies for those all-important Eeveelutions.

best pokemon go locations in manila - eastwood

Eastwood City (Quezon City)

We’re kinda bummed that there aren’t that many hotspots up north. If you live in the City of Stars, your best bet is the Eastwood Mall complex. The place has a good variety of pokémon not as much as BGC but good enough. You’ll find a lot of Exeggutors, Krabbys, Magikarps, Staryus, and Tentacools mixed in with a few random others. They spawn mostly along Orchard Road loop and the Walk of Fame. Haven’t seen him out in the wild, but my sister says she’s caught a Blastoise there as well.

best pokemon go locations in manila - ocean park

Manila Ocean Park (Manila)

You’d think that Luneta Park would be a hotbed for exciting pokémon , but it appears Manila Ocean Park is where it’s at. Apart from being home to a wide array of marine animals, the marine park seems to have also adopted a variety of water and electric pokémon . Unless you have a trip planned, we don’t necessarily recommend this place as the pokémon you can find here are found elsewhere, but we’re putting it in because it is a known hotspot. The place is teeming with Magikarps, Goldeens, Psyducks, and a healthy supply of Magnemites.

While you’re in the area try your luck by the Rizal Shrine and also around Fort Santiago. I’ve seen a few rare Pokémon spawn here from time to time.


We have anecdotal evidence of rares like Dragonites spawning in the wild but we haven’t seen one ourselves. We’ve seen a Charizard, a Lickitung, a Magmar, an Onix, a Porygon, and a Scyther randomly in the wild. But we have yet to find a place where they spawn regularly. Evolved versions of common pokémon (Wartortle, Arbok, Butterfree, Wigglytuff) also spawn randomly.

If you know of any good Pokémon Go hunting grounds in Metro Manila leave a message in the comments section below.

[irp posts=”7981″ name=”How to catch Ditto in Pokémon Go”]

Hands-On

Huawei Mate 20 Pro Hands-on: Best phone of 2018?

Huawei outdoes itself again

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In an industry where incremental updates are the new norm, Huawei manages to wow us again — barely a year after the release of the P20 Pro. The Chinese company is back with the Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro which might just be the best among the best this year.

In this video, we go over the phones’ new designs, updated cameras, and new memory card format. We also go through the differences between the Huawei Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro.

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Features

Huawei Mate 20 vs Mate 20 Pro: What are the differences?

Price isn’t the only factor

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Huawei has once again launched two flagships phones at the same time; one comes with a Pro moniker, while the other does not. Like before, there are some significant differences between the Mate 20 pair to take note of.

While we wait to get our hands on the Porsche Design Mate 20 RS and Mate 20 X, here are the two phones we already know everything about.

Display

One obvious difference is in their displays. While the Mate 20 Pro goes for a notched 6.39-inch 1440p curved HDR OLED display — certainly a mouthful — the regular Mate 20 has a 6.53-inch 1080p RGBW HDR LCD with a much smaller notch.

The Pro model justifies the larger notch by housing a more complex camera system for secured facial recognition, but if that doesn’t matter to you, the regular variant’s Dew Drop notch may be more appealing — and definitely less intrusive.

In addition, the Mate 20 Pro’s OLED tech allows it to curve the edges and equip an in-display fingerprint scanner. It’s essentially the more modern-looking design of the pair.

Performance

Since both models have Huawei’s Kirin 980 chipset installed, pure performance is virtually identical. The Pro and non-Pro also share the same memory and storage configuration of 6GB and 128GB, respectively, although the plain Mate 20 has a more affordable 4GB memory variant available, too.

Another minor difference: The 4200mAh capacity of the Mate 20 Pro, along with the more energy-efficient OLED, provides it with potentially longer battery life than what the Mate 20’s 4000mAh capacity and LCD panel offer.

A more significant advantage for the Mate 20 Pro is its inclusion of a 40W SuperCharge adapter in the package — noticeably better than the 22.5W output of the Mate 20’s. Plus, the Pro version can charge other phones wirelessly using wireless reverse charging tech.

Cameras

Perhaps, you’ll care most about the difference in camera quality and performance. While it’s too early to make photo and video comparisons, an initial look at specs shows that the Mate 20 Pro may have an edge.

There are three modules in place for the Pro: One is a 40-megapixel main camera, another has 20 megapixels and an ultra-wide lens, and the final unit offers 8 megapixels with 3x optical zoom

As for the Mate 20, its main camera has only 12 megapixels, the ultra-wide shooter settles for 16 megapixels, and the 8-megapixel telephoto camera goes up to only 2x optical zoom.

Despite the larger notch of the Mate 20 Pro, they share the same 24-megapixel selfie camera.

Pricing and colors

This part largely depends on where you reside, but in an ideal setting, all five colors — Emerald Green, Midnight Blue, Twilight, Pink Gold, and Black — should be available for both models.

Pricing is another matter, and it again depends per region. In Europe, the Mate 20’s 4GB+128GB configuration retails for EUR 799 and its 6GB+128GB model goes for EUR 849. The Mate 20 Pro’s sole 6GB+128GB variant costs EUR 1,049, making it more expensive by EUR 250 and EUR 200, respectively.

In Singapore, the Mate 20’s 6GB+128GB setup retails for SG$ 998, while the Mate 20 Pro is at SG$ 1,348 — a difference of SG$ 350.

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Huawei Mate 20 series first to have Nano Memory Card

Could this become a trend?

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Aside from introducing a host of flagship features to the freshly minted Mate 20 series, Huawei also introduced a new memory card standard, simply named Nano Memory Card.

It’s available on both the Mate 20 and Mate 20 Pro, and it effectively replaces the microSD slot we’ve become so accustomed to. The question is: What’s so special about it?

The simplest answer is that it has the same size as the nano-SIM card inside any smartphone today. Because of the identical dimensions, the secondary card slot doesn’t have to be designed differently, like what has been done for microSD cards.

In the case of the Mate 20 series, the removable card tray has back-to-back slots: one for the nano-SIM, and the other for either another nano-SIM or separate Nano Memory Card.

As of writing, Huawei will be offering 128GB and 256GB NM Cards, with speeds of up to 90MB/s.

It’s certainly a more efficient way of adding physical storage to a handset, and allows manufactures like Huawei to use the saved space for other features, like a large battery.

Looking ahead, it seems only logical for other smartphone brands to follow suit, but that would mean consumers would have to buy into a whole new standard and let go of their microSD cards.

The same thing happened with the introduction of the USB-C port, wherein users had to replace their micro-USB cables for the newer, more intuitive system. It’s been a gradual process, but definitely rewarding.

It’ll take a while before we find out if this will become a trend, but for now, we should appreciate Huawei’s courage in taking the first, big step.

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