Smartphones

How to exchange your Samsung Galaxy Note 7 in the Philippines

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You’ve probably heard about it a million times. You’ve heard from the news, from your family and peers, and from Samsung. And you’ve heard right: A battery defect has caused a few Galaxy Note 7 phones to explode during and after charging

Samsung has since launched an internal investigation and found a “battery-cell issue” in batteries made in South Korea. More notably, the consumer electronics giant issued a sweeping recall of over 2 million Note 7 units worldwide on September 2nd, a week after the first incident was reported in South Korea. Sales have stopped, and a mandatory update that prevents affected phones from fully charging the battery has been rolled out.

Samsung on September 8 announced a replacement program where users in the Philippines could exchange their Galaxy Note 7 handsets for new ones that are considered safe. The company had previously told customers they should expect the safe Note 7 units from October 1st. The finer details of the announcement can be found here.

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Contents of the box of a new Galaxy Note 7 that is deemed safe

But seeing that we’re just a day removed from the start of Samsung’s exchange program, we thought it would be best to summarize what we know about it and what we’ve been told during our recent meeting with Samsung executives.

  1. First things first: The exchange program encompasses all Galaxy Note 7 devices sold through authorized retailers, including Lazada Philippines, and through carriers Globe Telecom and Smart Communications.
  2. Samsung is prepared to replace all 6,000-plus phones sold in the Philippines prior to the recall in one go. Even if everyone who had bought the phone somehow manages to show up on October 1.
  3. Users can also exchange the Note 7 for an S7 edge (Samsung will refund the price difference) or get their money back in full.
  4. Customers must bring the following: the retail box with all the included accessories; one ID; and a proof of purchase.
  5. Samsung recommends bringing the Note 7 to the store where the customer bought it. But if a unit was purchased in another part of the country — say, Davao — one can have it exchanged in a service location in Manila or another city. Proof of purchase will be required, of course.
  6. All those who return their handset from tomorrow will get a screen protector and a P1,000 gift certificate to use on any Samsung purchase.
  7. The new Note 7 units can be identified by a green battery icon on the status bar, and on the always-on and power-off screens; a black dot on the box; and their IMEIs or serial numbers. You can run a phone’s serial number against this database to find out if it is safe.

Samsung’s exchange program is currently ongoing in some parts of the world, and majority of customers seem to prefer getting a replacement Note 7 over the alternatives. Samsung earlier said around one million customers worldwide had exchanged their devices. Over 60 percent of old Note 7s have been returned in the U.S. and South Korea, 57 percent in Europe.

Samsung expects all recalled Note 7 phones in the Philippines will be returned by the end of the year. Galaxy Note 7 sales in the country will resume on — you guessed it — October 1st.

[irp posts=”9847" name=”Samsung earned record profits despite Note 7 recall”]

News

The Samsung Galaxy Fold is official!

Take a look at the future!

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After months of endless rumors, Samsung has finally unveiled its first foldable phone, the Galaxy Fold. Revealed at today’s Unpacked event, the foldable phone promises the next generation of smartphone technology.

Though missing a few specs, the Galaxy Fold touts performance, flexibility, and bravado in one package.

First of all, the phone sports a foldable 7.3-inch Infinity Flex Display. Revealed months ago, the display can freely transform between an expansive 7.3-inch tablet mode and a smaller 4.6-inch phone mode. Unfolded, the phone is a QXGA+ resolution powerhouse. Folded, the phone carries a workable HD+ display.

Though obscured, the Galaxy Fold introduces a new folding hinge mechanism built with multiple interlocking gears.

Under the hood, the Galaxy Fold boasts a Qualcomm 7nm octa-core processor, 12GB of RAM, 512GB of internal storage. Outside, the phone carries a triple rear camera setup — 16-megapixel ultrawide camera + 12-megapixel wide-angle camera + a telephoto lens. In front, it has a 16-megapixel selfie shooter when folded.

For power, the Galaxy Fold comes with two batteries for both folded and unfolded modes. In total, the battery rounds out to a sizable 4380mAh.

Currently, Samsung is planning four colors for the initial release. It will come in LTE and 5G variants. The Galaxy Fold will launch on April 26 for USD 1,980.

Besides the revolutionary smartphone, Samsung has also launched the current-gen Galaxy S10 series and several new wearables.

SEE ALSO: Samsung Galaxy S10 Hands-On

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Galaxy S10

Instagram photo challenge with the Samsung Galaxy S10

Hands-on with all three versions!

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Samsung’s newest Galaxy S devices have just been announced and we’re blessed with three versions: The Samsung Galaxy S10e (small), the Galaxy S10 (big), and the Galaxy S10+ (big big!).

Each phone is equipped with a number of cameras so you know what that means: IG photo test!

In our Her GadgetMatch video, we check out what’s so cool about the new Samsung phones and test what the cameras can do. Spoiler: They do a lot!

In case you’re having trouble viewing, watch HERE.

SEE ALSO: Samsung’s new LED light cover is the phone case we’ve always wanted

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Galaxy S10

Samsung Galaxy S10 Hands-On

Does it live up to the hype?

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Infinity-O Display, five cameras, in-display fingerprint reader, next-generation wireless charging: these four features define Samsung’s new Galaxy S10.

When you take its features apart like this, it makes it seem like what we have is yet another underwhelming phone with no new groundbreaking feature. But to look at the S10 that way does the phone an injustice. It’s one that needs to be taken as a whole, not a sum of its parts.

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