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Huawei: ‘Apple is my teacher,’ leave Apple alone

‘The blame should rest with some US politicians’

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Last week, the American government barred Huawei from conducting business with American companies. The bombastic decision sent tsunamis across the globe. Everyone turned into a victim of Sinophobia. Everyone started fearing Huawei’s products.

Naturally, Sinophobia exists only outside Chinese territories. In China, Huawei is still a respectable company. While the world is shunning Huawei, China is enforcing retaliation against America’s prized smartphone — the iPhone. Chinese consumers have reportedly ditched Apple’s iPhones for Huawei’s devices.

Surprisingly, Huawei isn’t going for the same Apple-phobia. In fact, Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei has voiced out its support for Huawei. The founder has finally issued a definitive statement regarding the ban on his company.

In an interview with Bloomberg, the Huawei boss commented on the possible retaliation against America. Given the circumstances, China can similarly ban Apple from its shores. Notably, Apple manufactures its devices in China.

However, Ren Zhengfei isn’t supporting the potential move. “That will not happen, first of all. And second of all, if that happens, I’ll be the first to protest,” he said. Despite the obvious merit of retaliation, Huawei (and likely, China) will not fight fire with fire.

Surprisingly, the founder has even praised the American company’s merits. “Apple is my teacher, it’s in the lead. As a student, why go against my teacher? Never.”

Huawei isn’t blaming America companies for the ban. If anything, Huawei is doubling down against the American government. “We are ahead of the US If we were behind, there would be no need for Trump to strenuously attack us.”

“The blame should rest with some US politicians. We should understand that these US companies and Huawei share the same fate. We are both players in the market economy,” he said in another interview.

Despite the blatant disparity, Ren Zhengfei remains confident for the company’s future. “The US ban will not lead to negative growth or harm the development of our industry,” he concludes.

SEE ALSO: Huawei’s phones can’t use microSD cards anymore

Enterprise

Apple: Students with Chromebooks ‘are not going to succeed’

Wants you to buy the MacBook Pro instead

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Are you buying the new MacBook Pro? Apple’s new 16-inch notebook is a powerful device built for heavy-duty use. If you’re a student today, a new MacBook is surely an asset, especially if you do heavy design work. In fact, Apple itself is advertising the device as the best option for academic life.

In a recent interview with Cnet, Apple’s marketing head Phil Schiller waxed poetic about the company’s continued dominance in academic institutions and creative industries. “College students’ [use] is dominated by Macs,” Schiller said. “In the majority of creative fields — writers, video editors, music creators and programmers — I think that’s an area that’s super strong.”

In fact, a quick trip to the nearest private college confirms this fact. Macs are super popular. “We just have great customers who love the Mac,” Schiller said.

Of course, the computing world isn’t populated by just Apple. Windows is still a capable alternative for a huge chunk of the world. Apple isn’t happy with Windows’ continued presence.

“The PC world is a world of sameness,” said Schiller. “You have commodity hardware [and] a generic operating system that has to work on a lot of stuff, so it doesn’t work great on any one thing.”

True enough, Apple’s devices are catered more for creative purposes. However, Schiller’s rant goes further. The marketing boss goes off against Google’s Chromebooks, lambasting them as the poorest option for students.

“You need to have these cutting-edge learning tools to help kids really achieve their best results,” Schiller said. “Yet Chromebooks don’t do that. Chromebooks have gotten to the classroom because, frankly, they’re cheap testing tools for required testing. If all you want to do is test kids, well, maybe a cheap notebook will do that. But they’re not going to succeed.”

Schiller’s follow-up tweet doesn’t do much to save face. “We discussed giving kids and teachers the content, curriculum and tools they need to learn, explore and grow. Not just to take a test,” he tweeted. Like the original interview, the tweet touts Apple’s superiority in bringing out success, despite their astronomical prices. To Apple, owning a MacBook is a requirement to be successful.

Schiller’s opinion is a strong statement against Google’s popular notebook. The Chromebook is still a massively affordable and massively flexible option for markets of all sizes. Despite the division losing strength, Schiller’s statement goes against all PCs, as well.

SEE ALSO: Apple sets another record this year

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Enterprise

Huawei is building an ecosystem of connected devices

A smart phone is at the center of it all

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Huawei is making a strong push towards building an ecosystem built on the backbone of their success in the mobile computing space.

At the APAC Huawei Developer Day, the company unveiled a roadmap to demonstrate their transition from a phone maker to a complete ecosystem of devices. We’ve previously seen similar concepts from Apple, Google, and Samsung, and now Huawei plans on having a piece of the pie.

Huawei is the world’s second-largest phone maker today and aims to develop a wide array of smart applications for day-to-day usage. Obviously, Huawei Mobile Services (HMS) will be at the center of it all and consists of eight nodes. These nodes will offer extended hardware capability to the phone, and in return, provide more IoT and AI-based applications for the end-user.

These nodes include televisions, speakers, glasses, watches, vehicles, earbuds, laptops, and tablets. These devices can complement the phone and offer various use-case scenarios like smart homes, smart offices, next-gen mobility, and advances health tracking.

Smartphones are credited to be one of the most revolutionary inventions because a palm-sized device can completely replace appliances like televisions, computers, the radio, and more. Phones are always connected to the internet today and this opens up an abundance of new opportunities for everyone.

For developers, it can be an ideal platform to launch their services across a wide array of devices. Huawei claims it has 570 million HMS users, a figure that will be extremely enticing for developers because an audience is easily available.

HMS also includes software-based add-ons like AppGallery, Huawei Browser, Huawei Assistant, and Huawei Mobile Cloud. These services also act as a backup option for the brand because its recent flagship does not ship with Google apps out-of-the-box and requires an alternative.

By 2020, Huawei intends to open up access to 24 HMS Core kits, 55 services, and 997 APIs for the APAC region. To further encourage developers, the company has announced an investment of US$ 1 billion in the Shining-Star Program to train them on AI, AR/VR, and IoT.

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Enterprise

Former Twitter employees reportedly spied on users for Saudi Arabia

More than 6,000 accounts hacked

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Image source: Twitter

Absolutely no one is safe from drama these days. Facebook, Huawei, Blizzard; for the past year, these companies have found themselves on the receiving end of today’s negative headlines. Though a hotspot for its own controversies, Twitter is relatively steering clear from this year’s drama. In fact, the social media giant recently banned all political ads on its platform, inciting a round of applause from a lot of users.

Unfortunately, here’s a slight tarnish on Twitter’s relatively clean record. Announced today, two former Twitter employees have allegedly spied on numerous Twitter accounts for the Saudi Arabian government. All of the suspects are being (or have been) pursued by the American government.

According to the suit, one of the suspects, Ahmad Abouammo supposedly accessed only three accounts. However, another former employee, Ali Alzabarah, accessed over 6,000 accounts. Taking place between 2014 and 2015, the breach targeted individuals who were overtly critical of the Saudi Arabian government — including Jamal Khashoggi, a murdered Saudi Arabian journalist from last year.

“We will not allow U.S. companies or U.S. technology to become tools of foreign repression in violation of U.S. law,” said US Attorney David L. Anderson, according to The Washington Post. For the first time in a while, the American government is taking a strong stance against Saudi Arabia, a country controversially supported by US President Donald Trump.

In Twitter’s defense, the company is decrying the blatant invasion of privacy. According to a spokesman, Twitter’s sensitive data is accessed only by “a limited group of trained and vetted employees.” For what it’s worth, Twitter values the importance of dissenting opinions. “We understand the incredible risks faced by many who use Twitter to share their perspectives with the world and to hold those in power accountable. We have tools in place to protect their privacy and their ability to do their vital work.”

SEE ALSO: Twitter is finally getting a dark mode for Android!

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