Features

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet hands-on

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Lenovo can’t seem to get enough of hybrid and modular designs. The ThinkPad X1 Tablet has a little bit of both, but despite sounding like a full-on tablet, the convertible we have here behaves more like a laptop. Let us explain.

Convertibles aren’t a new concept; in fact, all the hybrid notebooks released in the past couple of years feel like they’re playing catch-up to Microsoft’s pioneering Surface lineup. To stand out, every execution is a bit different. Take the Samsung Galaxy TabPro S, for example: It disguises itself as an Android tablet, but it’s a full-fledged Windows computer through and through. The ThinkPad X1 Tablet takes a different path, choosing to be a business-oriented Windows convertible with modular components more than anything else. It’s this kind of flexibility that makes this fledgling category so exciting.

Since hybrid laptops are so distinct from one another and function differently for every type of user, we’ll apply the same idea to the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet. After all, certain features will serve an office worker really well, but a multimedia buff not so much. We’ll simplify things by narrowing down the usage cases to four.

lenovo-thinkpad-x1-tablet-5

Writers will love the keyboard

Despite lots of convertibles successfully acting like actual laptops, few manage to provide a pleasant typing experience. We have to applaud Lenovo for upholding the ThinkPad lineup’s image and bringing its keyboard expertise to the X1 Tablet. It has to be the most laptop-like implementation we’ve seen on a convertible this year.

Key travel is splendid for a keyboard this thin, and there’s a distinct amount of space between each key. Wrists rest comfortably on the end of the board, and since the attachment doesn’t have its own power supply, there’s no heat to make your palms sweat. There’s also backlighting in case you’re working at night and are too lazy to reach for a light switch.

With the keyboard attached, there are a total of three ways to navigate: You can use the tablet’s touchscreen, the keyboard’s trackpad, or the signature red TrackPoint. We’ve always chosen the trackpad, because the touch experience on Windows 10 still feels five years behind iOS and Android devices, and the TrackPoint felt mostly unnecessary when there’s a touchscreen available. This isn’t to say the trackpad wins by default; the three clicky buttons above the trackpad and its compatible Windows gestures are fast enough to speed through open tabs on Chrome and Microsoft Office.

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Artists shouldn’t give up their graphics tablets for this

The stylus pen is both a blessing and a bother. It’s great that you don’t have to plug it into a power source to charge, but you also have to go through the hassle of finding an uncommon AAAA battery to slide in once the bundled one is dead.

Using it to draw on the touchscreen is a slippery affair. Without any replaceable tips or added texture, the stylus glides across the display like ice. This is bad news for anyone who wants precise control over inputs, and if you want to backtrack on any mistake, there’s no eraser on the other end to save you. The good news is that it behaves like an actual pen, thanks to a thick body and 2,048 levels of sensitivity. On top of that, the stylus has built-in left- and right-click buttons that you can program to other functions on Windows.

Fortunately, the build we received is equipped with an Intel Core m5 processor and 8GB of RAM, making it more than qualified to handle Photoshop and some light video editing. We managed to make the X1 Tablet open a hundred high-resolution photos at once on Photoshop without trouble, and the tablet didn’t flinch when we began editing each one. There are variants with a weaker Core m3 or faster Core m7 installed, but the one we have here seems suffice for everyday tasks. The 256GB SSD that came with our unit is also recommendable, since Windows 10 takes up a lot of space and you can easily eat up more once all your videos and apps are imported.

lenovo-thinkpad-x1-tablet-3

Multimedia consumption is a mixed bag

We can summarize this section in two parts: The available ports make connectivity on the X1 Tablet seamless, but the 12-inch display and stereo speakers don’t do their ends of the job.

With so many manufacturers relying on a sole USB Type-C port for charging and plugging in peripherals, it’s such a breath of fresh air to see the X1 Tablet offer a full-sized USB port, USB Type-C port, an audio jack, and Mini DisplayPort. The USB port accepts all those flash drives stored in your desk drawer, while the Type-C port is used for charging, as well as future-proofing in case every single company begins focusing on USB-C as the only standard.

It’s those things that push the X1 Tablet into laptop territory, but it’s a shame it doesn’t leap in terms of visuals or sound. The stereo speakers, in particular, are a lot weaker than what you’d find on much smaller smartphones. And in spite of its 2160 x 1440-pixel resolution, sharpness and strong color reproduction seem lost on the display. Plugging in external speakers and pumping up the brightness to maximum are prerequisites to movie watching.

If you want to get fancy, Lenovo is selling a presenter module for $279 that can shoot a 60-inch projection from about two meters away. We weren’t able to try it out ourselves, but we can say with certainty that it’s a hefty investment, so consider your lifestyle and living space before spending the extra cash.

lenovo-thinkpad-x1-tablet-6

Built for travelers

Something all users are going to appreciate is the adjustable kickstand at the back of the tablet. You can adjust it freely without set positions or help from the keyboard attachment. The stand is also wide enough to sit on your lap as long as you keep your legs together. And even with the keyboard attached, the whole thing is feather-light for a laptop replacement at 1.1kg.

Behind it, you can find slots for a microSD card and SIM card. Anyone who transfers photos from a camera during a trip and needs a data connection to instantly upload online knows how vital these two slots are. If for some unfortunate reason your camera is unusable, there’s a decent 8-megapixel camera with LED flash at the back of the tablet to help out – just don’t expect any miracles.

And now, we must ask: How’s the battery life? To be frank, it’s average compared to all the other tablets and laptops we tested. With mixed usage, which involves streaming TV shows, surfing on Chrome, and editing on Photoshop every now and then, the X1 Tablet can last a little less than five hours on a full charge. What’s impressive it how fast the tablet charges, able to achieve an ample amount of juice in only 30 minutes of charging.

Like the presenter module mentioned earlier, the productivity module costing $149 comes to the rescue. Lenovo claims it can add an additional five hours to the battery life, which means it would double the endurance if it works as advertised. We highly recommend purchasing one if you plan to work far from a wall socket; plus, it provides additional USB 3.0 and full-sized HDMI ports.

lenovo-thinkpad-x1-tablet-1

Fun in a block

You really can’t tell by the industrial design and blocky exterior, but the X1 Tablet is more fun to use than it looks. And by fun, we mean it doesn’t give you a headache when you make it work. In typical ThinkPad fashion, the tablet simply takes all the tasks you throw at it and performs. You don’t have to put much thought into using it, such as charging the keyboard or stylus. Snapping the keyboard on and adjusting the angles are straightforward, and once you begin typing, you forget for a moment that it isn’t an actual notebook.

Again, you can’t rely on it for pure multimedia consumption. The battery life and audio-visual outputs just don’t hold up. Lenovo probably noticed these weakness during the production stages, and hence, we have the productivity and presenter modules to fill in the cracks. The pair of attachments actually bolster the functionality and make the tablet a true entertainment device, but you’ll have to pay the hefty price.

(Notes: The ThinkPad X1 Tablet package Lenovo sent us came with the tablet itself, attachable keyboard, and stylus pen. According to Lenovo, if you purchase the variant costing P83,990 in the Philippines, it’ll come with everything we mentioned, plus the productivity module. Elsewhere, the X1 Tablet’s price begins at $1,029 for the entry-level Intel Core m3 variant, and it costs around $1,299 for a Core m5 build similar to what we have.)

[irp posts=”9152″ name=”Lenovo gets serious about AR with New Glass C200″]

Hands-On

Apple iPhone 14 Plus Unboxing & Hands On

Better late to the party than never

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The iPhone 14 Plus may have come a little bit late in the party, but the new ‘Plus’ iPhone might actually be your best bet.

To cut the story short, it is iPhone 14’s bigger brother.

Apart from a bigger display, it also has the longest battery life in an iPhone ever.

But would you choose it over the more expensive iPhone 14 Pro Max?

And are you willing to trade-off the faster ProMotion display, Dynamic Island, and better cameras for a more “affordable” iPhone?

Watch our unboxing and hands-on of the iPhone 14 Plus to know more.

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Lenovo Yoga Slim 7i Carbon 2022: Freelancer’s partner

A glimpse of freelancing life

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Yoga Slim 7i Carbon

Being a freelancer means you have to stay conveniently connected on-the-go. Some people think it’s all carefree days and not much work. While sometimes, that can be true, you don’t get to enjoy that flexibility without putting in hard work first.

To shed some light on this and clear up common misconceptions, I want to share a sneak peek of a day in my life as a freelancer. I will be taking along  the latest Lenovo Yoga Slim 7i Carbon designed on the Intel® Evo™ platform. Hopefully, you’ll see why it’s the perfect laptop for those looking to elevate their freelancing career.

Power and portability made handy

Freelancing offers a very flexible lifestyle as long as you make sure all the work gets done. To get my creative juices flowing,I like exploring new places to get inspiration for fresh ideas. That means, portability is an important consideration for the gadgets I use for work. 

The newest Lenovo Yoga Slim 7i Carbonis ultra lightweight (968grams to be exact) and ultra-slim (14.mm thin), making it super handy. It  also easily fits my 13-inch handbag along with my other things.

Yoga Slim 7i Carbon

What’s most impressive is how much power it packs despite its petite frame. Like the earlier version of the device we reviewed nearly two years ago, this one’s also an Intel® Evo™ certified  machine. The Intel® Evo™ badge signifies the perfect combination of features and technologies, tested under everyday conditions for an exceptional experience that lives up to its expectations. That means it’s been tuned to deliver the best of Intel.

The one I’m using is specifically powered by a 12th Gen Intel Core i7 2.1Ghz processor. It even has 16GB of RAM and 512GB of internal SSD storage. It literally has more power than I need in such an easy-to-carry body. Exactly how I like it.

Display that’s easy on the eyes

Yoga Slim 7i Carbon

I find early mornings to be my least productive hours. So, to help me get through them, I check my email and phone messages while having a quick brunch. It helps that the Lenovo Yoga Slim 7i Carbon’s PureSight Display makes skimming through my inbox easy on the eyes. The laptop has the usual TÜV Rheinland low-blue light certification which the brand achieved through the Eye Care Mode feature that reduces the blue light emitted by the screen. This goes a long way in protecting our eyes.

 

The display also has a silky smooth feel and flow to it. The 90Hz refresh rate on the 2.5K (2,560 x 1,600) screen is just lovely to interact with. It really helps make scrolling through web pages and documents feel smoother. The aspect ratio (16:10) is just about the sweet spot for working, helping boost my productivity even further. 

Practicality and the ‘lifestyle’ aesthetic collide

My energy usually peaks mid-day so this is when I usually set online meetings and presentations. I enjoyed the Yoga Slim 7i Carbon’s anti-glare matte finish display because even in bright sunlight, I experienced no issues with my face reflecting back at me. It also helps that it has up to 400 nits of brightness making the screen visible even in brighter environments.

The matte moon-white color is stunning and complements all my other things. I feel a little extra presentable during meetings because of its minimalist design.

While I typically stop working at 4:30PM, I don’t shut down my laptop just yet. I often check back in, respond to emails, and sometimes get back on the laptop to do a little more work before calling it a day. I’m stunned at how quickly Yoga Slim 7i Carbon switches on the moment you flip the lid with no need to press any button.While the device doesn’t have a fingerprint scanner, it is equipped with Windows Hello face-recognition using the webcam.

Yoga Slim 7i Carbon

Having to work at different locations, it also helps that Lenovo has thought about privacy and security. One of my favorite features on the Yoga Slim 7i Carbon is the Smart Presence Detection. Essentially, it knows whether I’m still looking at the laptop or not. When I need to step away to get my refreshment fix, the display automatically locks and it also unlocks just as easily  when it knows I’m done going AFK.

Durability and flexibility assurance

Yoga Slim 7i Carbon

The Yoga Slim 7i Carbon is a barely-there laptop, perfect for those who have to carry their laptop around all day. Lenovo says it offers military-grade toughness, too. This is based on the nine tests that the company has undertaken, including drops from a 76cm height, dust-resistance and the laptop’s ability to withstand extreme temperatures. Impressive stuff. 

While bigger can be better for others, I prefer lighter. Even a well-designed smaller, lighter laptop has its struggles somewhat to shift heat over a well-designed larger one. So yes, there is at least a slight performance hit related to this laptop’s design. 

With the 3-Year Lenovo Premium Care and 3-Year Accidental Damage Protection that also come with every purchase, you won’t have to worry about taking your device to service centers should you encounter problems since Lenovo offers 24/7 chat and on-site support.

Hassle-free, smooth workflow anywhere

The Lenovo Slim 7i Carbon seems like an ideal choice for those who want a reliable hybrid work computer. It’s small, lightweight and has plenty of power to let you complete most everyday work tasks. 

On top of that, it’s also a stylish yet minimal  device that fits nicely into most working (and non-working) environments. Based on my limited hands-on time with the device, it’s a solid machine for modern-day workers including myself.

It’s tiny but powerful and it’s perfect for my life as a freelancer. With its long battery life and innovative features, I’m not worried about my efficiency despite juggling multiple tasks.


This feature is a collaboration between GadgetMatch and Lenovo Philippines.

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Samsung’s Flip Phone Innovation Over The Years

All before the Galaxy Z Flip craze took the world by storm

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Galaxy Z Flip4

Admit it or not, most of us have become so used to smartphones looking a lot like one another. Some spec bumps, design refreshes, camera cutout changes, that’s about it. That’s all in a span of a year or as short as six months.

Galaxy Z Flip4

While smartphone designs won’t be as exciting as how it was before with feature phones, Samsung made jaws drop when their foldable prototype became a retail product as a result of years of R&D (research and development).

Galaxy Z Flip4

Outer displays of the Galaxy Z Flip4, Nori F, W2015, and W2017

In a crowd full of slender glass and polycarbonate slabs, Samsung has created the Galaxy Z Flip not just to make a new breed of smartphone, but also to bring back what people miss — the excitement in phone design.

The Galaxy Z Flip4, Nori F, W2015, and W2017 when unfolded

It started when people suddenly missed the weirdly-addictive feeling of clamshell phone clasps every time someone ends a call conversation. This 2022, it’s satisfying as it is on the new Galaxy Z Flip4.

It’s the nostalgia kicking

Back when I was in grade school, I’m quite different than kids of my age. While most 7-year-olds enjoy their time with crayons, coloring books, or games (either physically or digitally), my mind and eyes were focused on gadgets like phones. Whenever we go to malls, I collected a lot of phone brochures to the point where a salesman scolded me.

Also that specific period in time, most people prefer Nokia phones over anything else. Still, I dreamt of having at least one Samsung phone — a Samsung slider, not the flippy ones.

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

The phones above are just some of the Samsung phones I fantasized to have — i620, G800, E870, U700, S8300 UltraTouch, and most especially, the U900 Soul.

While I became more interested in tech due to Nokia and their XpressMusic plus N-series phones, Samsung’s slider phones were the game-changer for their classy and sleek designs that other manufacturers failed to bring to the table. It even came to a point when Samsung became obsessed with having the thinnest phone — the Samsung U100 Ultra Edition II at just 5.9mm.

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

But what about flip phones? If memory serves me right, the first Samsung phone I’ve ever seen in real life was my late aunt’s Samsung X640. It wasn’t as appealing to me but for a 2005 clamshell, it’s decently-looking compared to the Nokia 6101 with that bulging antenna that my third-grade professor in computer class flexed a lot. Albeit, that Nokia was a seller with its two displays.

TMI but I just thought that if my aunt is still alive, she would be rocking the latest Samsung phone — either the Galaxy Z Fold4 or the Z Flip4. Just putting this here since she contributed a lot to why I became a gadget nerd.

To All The Samsung Flip Phones I’ve Loved Before

Right before the foldable craze started, Samsung was already in the game for their fashion-forward feature flip phones. So why not take a trip down memory lane with me and mesmerize yourself with some collection of Samsung’s best-looking clamshell phones over the years.

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

For the classy

From 2008 all the way to 2019, flip phones with gold accents paired with faux leather or replicated diamonds are the classiest-looking phones ever — at least in Samsung’s phone-folio.

Samsung E500 (2006)

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

It may not be as popular as it looks in 2006, but it’s definitely one rare phone. It’s perfect for making a bold statement with gold and jewelries.

Samsung L310 (2008)

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

While it heavily reminds me of the Nokia 7390 from 2006, during this time, it’s already one of (if not the) Samsung’s classiest-looking phones ever.

Samsung i9230 Galaxy Golden (2013)

The first Android flip phone title probably goes to the Samsung W999 that came in 2011, but the Galaxy Golden still made huge waves overseas as an elegant-looking Android phone trapped in an old clamshell body. It may not be the best Android phone of its time but hey, at least you get twice the Super AMOLED display and a pseudo-premium leather feel and look.

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

Fun fact: Samsung is the only phone company that still manufactured more than five foldable phones past the “dumbphone” era. Thus, there were already Android-powered Samsung flip phones right before the debut of the Galaxy Z Flip line in 2020 — the W999, i9230, W2014, W2015, G9198, plus the W2016, W2017, W2018, and W2019 in the succeeding sections below.

Samsung W2016/W2017

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

Ditching the faux leather backs and trimmings, the W2016 and W2017 are the Flip phone versions of the ever-popular Galaxy S6 and S7. As evident as how the gold shines on their glass front and back up to the frame, these phones were popular in China that only a handful can afford — from CNY 9999 to a huge jump of CNY 20,000 (roughly US$ 1402~2804 / SG$ 2017~4034 / PhP 82,132~164,281).

Samsung W2018/W2019

Samsung brought back the black and gold combination with the W2018 and W2019 — which are also the Flip phone variants of the Galaxy S8 and S9 due to the similar hardware — such as the dual-variable aperture camera found both on the W2019 and Galaxy S9+.

The W2018 alone had a retail value of a jaw-dropping CNY 15,999 (US$ 2200 / SG$ 3227 / PhP 132,000 in today’s conversion rate). Fortunately, the first Flip (that made its debut a year after W2019 was launched) wasn’t as pricey and not limited to the Chinese market anymore.

For the quirky ones

Some may find them weird, others may think they are attractive. Either way, Samsung still sold these phones towards a niche market.

Samsung Nori F (2010)

The LG Lollipop (2009) took the interest of many young Asians because of how cute the phone is. Paired with the ever-eargasmic hit song ‘Lollipop’ is by 2NE1 and BIGBANG (which is also nostalgic to me as a veteran K-Pop fan), Samsung decided to create its direct rival with the Nori F.

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

Nori might mean “seaweed” in the Japanese context but 놀이 (nor-i) means “play” in Korean. Cool enough, Samsung made four playful colors, each highlighting one’s style while still showcasing the quirky three-array LED panel that can do sorts of pixelated, animated magic.

*It’s the loudest phone I have today as my alarm. The alarm works even if the phone’s off  🤯

Samsung P900/P910 (2006)

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

Feature phones during 2006 were either basic-looking or just plain “weird”. With swiveling phones becoming one of the go-to designs, Samsung has made a clever way to not just take and display landscape photos, but also to create a pocket-friendly product that can also broadcast TV shows directly.

Samsung Serene (2005)

One of Samsung’s most historic collaborations is making a phone with the popular audio company Bang & Olufsen (or commonly referred to B&O).

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

While Nokia continued to make waves with their XpressMusic phones and Sony Ericsson had Walkman phones, this particular venture resulted to the creation of Samsung Serene as a special-designed music device and flip phone in one. I’m just guessing the wordplay came from “Serenity” or the state of calmness and peace — which is also correlated to music.

Back then, it costed as much as US$ 1275 (roughly SG$ 1834 or PhP 74,692), a price tag no one would bat an eye due to the ever-growing list of affordable feature phones.

For the ultra-sleek and minimal

There are these clean-looking flip phones, too. You might have even seen them before but you just can’t tell because Samsung just had confusing phone names.

Samsung E870 (2006)

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

As said multiple times, 2006 phones are either basic-looking or just fascinatingly weird. But the Samsung E870 was compelling due to its cleaner, more minimal design with flat edges and larger, squarish keypad. Flip phones that time were nothing but bulging wedges with most having their thick antennas sticking out — Samsung neither an exception.

Samsung X520 (2006)

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

While the E870 is a clean slate, the X520 is more eccentric and irresistible due to its curves and a tempting color scheme that reminds you of wine and chocolate. Even the duotone keypad reminds you of a chocolate bar of some sort. I’m just guessing that their E-series stands for “Elegance” and X is for “Xtraordinary”.

Samsung U300 (2007)

And while already on the topic of Samsung’s past phone naming schemes, the U-series definitely stands for Samsung “Ultra Edition” series of phones — way before they used it on the Galaxy S20 Ultra.

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

The U300 stood out to me mainly because Samsung highlighted its thin form factor at a measly — you’ve guessed it — 9.6mm. If you’ve paid attention earlier, this is the flip phone that joins the Ultra Edition II series of Samsung: the U100 (5.9mm candybar), U600 10.1, and the U700 12.1 (the sliding phone I wanted to have) altogether.

Samsung S3600 (2008)

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

A year after, Samsung has released a flip that’s as classy as the U300 with its chic, brushed metal cover. But instead of the thin form factor and a “better” 3.2MP camera, you instead get a 1.3MP camera, microSD card slot, and a bigger battery at a more enticing price range.

Samsung Master Dual (2014)

For the record, 2014 was when Samsung launched the Galaxy S5 and the Galaxy Note 4 (also the year when the first GadgetMatch video on YouTube was released). But in South Korea, some people just can’t seem to adapt to the oddly-large smartphones — especially the elderly.

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

The Master Dual running Android was Samsung’s answer. It was then followed by the Galaxy Folder and Folder2, just without that nice external AMOLED display.

For the Fashion-Forward

F means a lot in Samsung’s vocabulary: Flip, Fashion-Forward, Female, or just those with utmost Fascination to anything Floral.

Samsung C3520 (2011)

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

This is the same year when the Galaxy S II and the first-ever Galaxy Note were released. Samsung launching this floral-studded flip phone is just a testament that large smartphones are really not for everyone — at least in 2011.

Samsung S5150 Diva Folder (2009)

Back in the time when companies wanted to catch the attention of female consumers, fashion-centric phones like the Diva folder would make the cut.

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

Love it or hate it, this clamshell phone is definitely made for the true diva. The ultra-reflective and glossy plastic material of this phone reminded me of the trending smartphone cases that looked puffed and inflated.

Samsung E420 (2006)

Another 2006-born phone that made it to this feature is none other than the Samsung E420.

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

During its launch, it’s one of the most affordable in the “La Fleur” line — which happened to be Samsung’s fashion-inclined line of phones. However, looks can really be deceiving as it only offered looks without support for Bluetooth and MP3 while its rivals considered them as necessities.

The new breed of Flip phones

Almost fifteen years apart, we are now in the time where smartphone technology is continuously evolving while the foldable technology is still in its young stage. Still, Samsung has truly paved the way in making the foldable dreams come to a reality.

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip / Z Flip 5G (2020)

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip and Z Flip 5G are one of the pioneers in the clamshell-type foldable category. While the first Samsung foldable title goes to the Galaxy Z Fold line that cater the business-minded and professionals, the Z Flip was made with the youth in mind. However, its steep launch price of US$ 1380 / SG$ 1998 / PhP 79,990 isn’t really meant for the Gen Zs and borderline millennials (like me).

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 / Z Flip3 (2022/2021)

Galaxy Z Flip4

by Vincenz Lee | GadgetMatch

Ah, finally! The Galaxy Z Flip4 (together with the similarly-looking Z Flip3) are Samsung’s latest line of foldables, or rather, folding flip phones. With a more cutting-edge design, tougher hinge and display, longer battery, and better cameras all in a compact foldable form factor, the Galaxy Z Flip4 can surely stand out from the crowd.

Best of all? It’s more within the reach at US$ 999.99 / SG$ 1398 / PhP 53,990 — a lot cheaper than the Samsung Serene, W2018, and most definitely, the overly-priced W2019.

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