Enterprise

US government will be banned from using Huawei and ZTE tech

Not a total ban, though

Published

on

The president of the United States has just imposed a major ban against two Chinese tech giants, Huawei and ZTE, from working with the US government. The ban is a component of the Defense Authorization Act which US President Donald Trump has just signed after months of discussions.

We first heard news about the bill earlier this month followed by reports of Huawei spying on people and ZTE getting banned after getting accused of selling merchandise to US rivals. The fiasco hindered Huawei phones from getting sold through US carriers. ZTE, on the other hand, was saved by Trump as confirmed by his tweet.

In the end, though, both Chinese companies now have the same fate. The US Congress worked on a measure that will essentially ban the US government and soon-to-be allies from using components and availing services from Huawei, ZTE, and a number of other Chinese communications companies.

The ban, which will go into effect over the next two years, doesn’t completely cut the ties of the US with Huawei and ZTE. The Chinese companies are not allowed to be part of any “essential” or “critical” systems of the US government, but they can still work with the US government as long as they will not be used to route or view data.

Huawei is not happy about the ban, of course, and calls it a “random addition” to the defense bill which is “ineffective, misguided, and unconstitutional.” The company also said that the ban will increase cost for consumers and businesses.

Via: The Verge

SEE ALSO: ZTE faces ban from using Qualcomm, Android on their phones

Enterprise

Sweden is officially banning Huawei and ZTE

Must rid of brand by 2025

Published

on

For years, the American government has waged a lopsided war against Huawei and its 5G infrastructure. However, amidst the country’s Sinophobic sentiments, only two other countries have more reason to ban the Chinese company from its soil — Sweden and Finland. Finally, the situation has changed. Sweden is officially banning Huawei and ZTE.

Why does a Sweden ban make the most sense? Well, the country owns one of Huawei’s biggest competitors in the 5G industry, Ericsson. Meanwhile, the neighboring Finland owns the other biggest 5G rival, Nokia.

Now, the Swedish Post and Telecom Authority has announced the ban for any Huawei- or ZTE-based architecture for the country’s 5G industry. Any networks must divest from the banned brands before 2025. Currently, four networks — without the Chinese companies — are bidding for the privilege of building Sweden’s 5G networks.

With the ban, Sweden is joining the United Kingdom in banning the Chinese companies from future architecture. In other parts of the world, Nokia and Ericsson have already taken over from Huawei and ZTE. Of course, the smartphone industry is already rushing to build 5G-compatible smartphones. Most of 2020’s smartphones tout the compatibility even without stable 5G networks.

Outside of the 5G realm, Huawei is also experiencing a lot of crunch from smartphone component companies pulling their business from the Chinese company.

SEE ALSO: iPhone 12’s 5G feature is useless for most users, analysts say

Continue Reading

Enterprise

Samsung overtakes Huawei as the world’s top phone seller

Huawei falls drastically

Published

on

Amidst all the ongoing geopolitical turmoil, Huawei surprisingly rose above the competition and took the top spot in the food chain earlier this year. However, as expected, the Chinese company succumbed to the pressure. In the most recent ranking, Samsung overtakes Huawei as the world’s largest smartphone seller.

In April, Huawei took the lead by a sliver — 21 percent compared to Samsung’s 20 percent market share. Naturally, the lead, albeit small, was a surprise for the industry watchers. At the time, Trump’s Sinophobic initiatives were at an all-time high. Further, the ongoing pandemic didn’t help any Chinese brand at the time. Against all odds, Huawei still sold as much as it could.

However, times have changed. Most importantly, the American government finally banned Huawei from doing business with America-dependent companies without an approved license. That said, the company plunged drastically. As of August 2020, Huawei fell to just 16 percent market share, according to Counterpoint Research.

Meanwhile, Samsung slightly grew its share, going up to 22 percent. Despite only a small improvement, it was enough to upend Huawei at the top.

On the opposite side of things, Xiaomi took the other half of Huawei’s market share. From April’s 8 percent share, the Chinese company grew to 11 percent, putting it only a mark behind Apple’s 12 percent market share. As expect, other Chinese companies cannibalized the market left behind in Huawei’s absence.

Currently, Huawei is gearing up for a Mate 40 launch later this week, potentially boosting its sales in the short term. Of course, no one can tell at this point. The company is still banned under the current administration.

Continue Reading

Enterprise

Nokia is building a 4G network on the Moon

Lunar base by 2028

Published

on

For some parts of the world, internet speeds are either still spotty or completely non-existent. Though companies are trying to make 5G a thing, not everyone has access to decent connections yet. That said, the unlikeliest of places will get 4G coverage before anywhere else. Nokia is building a 4G network on the Moon.

As seen on their website, NASA has awarded funding for Nokia to build the Moon’s first 4G network. Costing US$ 14.1 million in funding, the new project will “support lunar surface communications at greater distances, increased speeds, and provide more reliability than current standards.”

In recent years, the American agency (and a few in other countries) has announced plans to return to the Moon. The return mission jumpstarts humankind’s eventual plans to go to Mars.

With the confirmed 4G deal, NASA edges closer to a working lunar base with live astronauts by 2028. The project will eventually help astronauts and researchers to send information back and forth to Earth much more efficiently.

Besides the Moon deal, Nokia has also committed to several projects in the burgeoning 5G industry, going head-to-head with the geopolitically controversial Huawei. Since then, the Finland-based brand has risen beyond its stable smartphone branch.

SEE ALSO: Nokia released its Android 11 roadmap

Continue Reading

Trending